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United States Foreign Aid South America

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NEWS
February 8, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the three Andean nations have agreed on the outlines of an anti-drug plan to be unveiled at next week's summit in Colombia, but the plan may not provide the immediate economic assistance that the South American countries had hoped for, Bush Administration officials said Wednesday. A communique to be signed by President Bush and the Andean leaders would express their common determination to replace cocaine commerce in the region with a legitimate economy.
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NEWS
February 12, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will travel to Colombia this week for a highly symbolic drug summit that is unlikely to have a quick impact on the flow of cocaine from South America, according to officials involved in pre-summit negotiations. Months of preparations for the long-awaited meeting, intended to coordinate a multi-pronged attack on cocaine at its source, have produced only a 16-page communique that "could have been signed last fall," one source said. In the meantime, U.S.
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NEWS
July 2, 1989
A National Security Council task force plans to recommend that President Bush greatly heighten the military's role in fighting the drug trade by sending military advisers and increasing economic aid to cocaine-producing South American countries, the New York Times reported in its Sunday editions. Task force officials insisted that the effort would not be a back door for pursuing traffickers with military force.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Bush Administration has completed a drug summit agreement with three South American countries, committing the United States to economic and military aid to counteract the Latin nations' economic reliance on drugs, an official said. In addition to the $423-million anti-drug package President Bush is proposing for Peru, Bolivia and Colombia, the Administration will pledge to help track illegal export of U.S.-produced firearms and crack down on drug-related chemical exports.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will travel to Colombia this week for a highly symbolic drug summit that is unlikely to have a quick impact on the flow of cocaine from South America, according to officials involved in pre-summit negotiations. Months of preparations for the long-awaited meeting, intended to coordinate a multi-pronged attack on cocaine at its source, have produced only a 16-page communique that "could have been signed last fall," one source said. In the meantime, U.S.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Bush Administration has completed a drug summit agreement with three South American countries, committing the United States to economic and military aid to counteract the Latin nations' economic reliance on drugs, an official said. In addition to the $423-million anti-drug package President Bush is proposing for Peru, Bolivia and Colombia, the Administration will pledge to help track illegal export of U.S.-produced firearms and crack down on drug-related chemical exports.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Here are excerpts from the text of President Bush's speech Tuesday night announcing a $7.9-billion war on drugs: This is the first time since taking the oath of office that I felt an issue was so important, so threatening, that it warranted talking directly with you, the American people . . . . Drugs have strained our faith in our system of justice. Our courts, our prisons, our legal system are stretched to the breaking point. The social costs of drugs are mounting . . . .
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
In the words of drug czar William J. Bennett, the Bush Administration's long-awaited plan for a new war on drugs contained no "magic bullet"--no dramatic new strategy for pressing the battle.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration is seriously considering the development of a multinational police force to attack record-setting cocaine production and to aid governments in Colombia and other coca-growing countries in South America that are unable to control the problem, a senior government official said Wednesday. The unprecedented wide-scale approach is being studied by President Reagan's National Drug Policy Board, which is expected to make an "expedited" recommendation to Atty. Gen.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Bush, appealing to Americans to get involved in "the toughest domestic challenge we've faced in decades," proposed a comprehensive four-point strategy Tuesday to combat illegal drug activity. In his first televised address to the American people since taking office, Bush painted a vivid picture of a drug scourge that he warned is "sapping our strength as a nation."
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the three Andean nations have agreed on the outlines of an anti-drug plan to be unveiled at next week's summit in Colombia, but the plan may not provide the immediate economic assistance that the South American countries had hoped for, Bush Administration officials said Wednesday. A communique to be signed by President Bush and the Andean leaders would express their common determination to replace cocaine commerce in the region with a legitimate economy.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Here are excerpts from the text of President Bush's speech Tuesday night announcing a $7.9-billion war on drugs: This is the first time since taking the oath of office that I felt an issue was so important, so threatening, that it warranted talking directly with you, the American people . . . . Drugs have strained our faith in our system of justice. Our courts, our prisons, our legal system are stretched to the breaking point. The social costs of drugs are mounting . . . .
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
In the words of drug czar William J. Bennett, the Bush Administration's long-awaited plan for a new war on drugs contained no "magic bullet"--no dramatic new strategy for pressing the battle.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Bush, appealing to Americans to get involved in "the toughest domestic challenge we've faced in decades," proposed a comprehensive four-point strategy Tuesday to combat illegal drug activity. In his first televised address to the American people since taking office, Bush painted a vivid picture of a drug scourge that he warned is "sapping our strength as a nation."
NEWS
July 2, 1989
A National Security Council task force plans to recommend that President Bush greatly heighten the military's role in fighting the drug trade by sending military advisers and increasing economic aid to cocaine-producing South American countries, the New York Times reported in its Sunday editions. Task force officials insisted that the effort would not be a back door for pursuing traffickers with military force.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration is seriously considering the development of a multinational police force to attack record-setting cocaine production and to aid governments in Colombia and other coca-growing countries in South America that are unable to control the problem, a senior government official said Wednesday. The unprecedented wide-scale approach is being studied by President Reagan's National Drug Policy Board, which is expected to make an "expedited" recommendation to Atty. Gen.
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