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United States Foreign Aid Third World

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NEWS
July 14, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted Thursday to significantly boost funding for international debt relief and for fighting AIDS overseas, handing unexpected victories to two Democratic lawmakers from California. Reps. Maxine Waters of Los Angeles and Barbara Lee of Oakland exulted after their amendments to a foreign aid bill drew support from enough Republicans to overcome opposition from GOP leaders.
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NEWS
July 14, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted Thursday to significantly boost funding for international debt relief and for fighting AIDS overseas, handing unexpected victories to two Democratic lawmakers from California. Reps. Maxine Waters of Los Angeles and Barbara Lee of Oakland exulted after their amendments to a foreign aid bill drew support from enough Republicans to overcome opposition from GOP leaders.
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NEWS
May 10, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Key allies of the United States warned Wednesday that the Bush Administration's opposition to a new aid package that would help Third World countries switch to ozone-friendly chemicals could jeopardize efforts to repair the widening hole in the Earth's ozone layer. At a meeting in Geneva sponsored by the United Nations to amend an accord on the ozone problem, delegates from Japan, Australia and European countries roundly criticized American opposition to the proposed $100-million aid program.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton said Friday President Bush has "abdicated both national and international leadership" on environmental protection, thus isolating the United States as "the lone holdout" at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1990 | From Reuters
The United States said Tuesday that it will go on the offensive against rich nations that use aid to promote their own business interests in the developing world by setting up a $500-million fund to do just that. The money will be split roughly evenly among Indonesia, Pakistan, the Philippines and Thailand to help U.S. companies win business in the telecommunications, transportation, power and construction equipment fields. "It's designed to fight fire with fire," U.S.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1988 | Associated Press
A group of conservation organizations on Tuesday opposed giving new U.S. money to the World Bank unless it is tied to debt relief for the Third World. Sierra Club representative Larry Williams told a congressional hearing he also was speaking for the National Wildlife Federation, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Environmental Defense Fund and the Environmental Policy Institute.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Despite a series of recent endorsements, the Bush Administration is facing an uphill fight in its efforts to launch its new plan to solve the Third World's debt problem. Leaders of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank threw their support behind the plan Tuesday, two days after finance ministers of the seven major industrial nations signed on. But their support was lukewarm. "They've got some serious problems ahead," Alan J.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
President Bush declared Wednesday that the West "must do more" to help Poland make the transition to a free-market economy but indicated that the United States would continue to move slowly on further aid until Warsaw worked out a program of economic reforms. "We want to work with them in every way we can, but I think it's important to see what their plan is," the President told reporters after a speech to the 152-country International Monetary Fund.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
World Bank President Barber B. Conable called for the industrial nations and developing countries to accelerate their economic adjustments in order to "move the world back from the brink of a deep recession." Conable said that without coordinated international action to reform current fiscal, monetary, credit and commercial policies, Third World countries are headed for economic disaster that won't stop at their borders.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration sounded an angry protest Tuesday against the mounting criticism it has endured at the Earth Summit, accusing U.S. allies of paying lip service to environmentalism by emphasizing rhetoric over action. The counterattack by two senior Administration officials set a confrontational tone in advance of President Bush's two-day visit--beginning early Friday morning--to the summit in Rio de Janeiro.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators here are on the verge of settling their most contentious disputes over environmental foreign aid and eliminating the issue that has posed the greatest potential for a disastrous rift between rich and poor nations at the Earth Summit. Barring an eleventh-hour reversal today, delegates cleaning up details of an environmental action plan are expected to accept a compromise negotiating text forged during three days of delicate talks.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush stood firm Sunday in his refusal to sign an Earth Summit treaty designed to protect plants and animals in their habitats, while British Prime Minister John Major expressed confidence that his country's problems with the agreement can be worked out. Appearing together after a two-day meeting at Camp David, Bush and Major aired differing conclusions about the proposed biodiversity treaty under consideration by participants in the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1981, Amy Skilbred visited the Mahaweli River Valley in Sri Lanka, hoping to see elephants and leopards in the wild. Five years later, Joyce Kelly went to the Nile River in Egypt, similarly intent upon getting a glimpse of its famous crocodiles. Neither was successful. Skilbred's disappointment has since been attributed to the construction of dams on the Mahaweli River, with the support of the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1990 | From Reuters
The United States said Tuesday that it will go on the offensive against rich nations that use aid to promote their own business interests in the developing world by setting up a $500-million fund to do just that. The money will be split roughly evenly among Indonesia, Pakistan, the Philippines and Thailand to help U.S. companies win business in the telecommunications, transportation, power and construction equipment fields. "It's designed to fight fire with fire," U.S.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Key allies of the United States warned Wednesday that the Bush Administration's opposition to a new aid package that would help Third World countries switch to ozone-friendly chemicals could jeopardize efforts to repair the widening hole in the Earth's ozone layer. At a meeting in Geneva sponsored by the United Nations to amend an accord on the ozone problem, delegates from Japan, Australia and European countries roundly criticized American opposition to the proposed $100-million aid program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1989
Former President Jimmy Carter, addressing an environmental conference in Los Angeles, said Wednesday that Western countries can help developing nations conserve their natural resources only after persuading their leaders that conservation will best meet the needs of their nations. "I don't have any sense of impending doom, of giving up, of saying, 'We can't change things,' " Carter said. "I think things can be changed. . . . The Third World is not a hopeless case."
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From The Washington Post
U.S. delegates to an international conference on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been instructed to oppose a plan supported by European governments that would provide $100 million to developing nations to help them reduce the use of the ozone-depleting chemical, informed sources said Tuesday.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From The Washington Post
U.S. delegates to an international conference on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been instructed to oppose a plan supported by European governments that would provide $100 million to developing nations to help them reduce the use of the ozone-depleting chemical, informed sources said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1989
Former President Jimmy Carter, addressing an environmental conference in Los Angeles, said Wednesday that Western countries can help developing nations conserve their natural resources only after persuading their leaders that conservation will best meet the needs of their nations. "I don't have any sense of impending doom, of giving up, of saying, 'We can't change things,' " Carter said. "I think things can be changed. . . . The Third World is not a hopeless case."
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