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United States Foreign Aid Ukraine

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BUSINESS
May 18, 1997 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The steady hum of detergent bottles being swept along an assembly line represents the sweet sound of earnings for S.C. Johnson Wax. After years of turmoil and uncertainty, the Wisconsin-based company has finally turned an early investment in Ukraine into a profitable business. Its Brillo detergent, for example, is now a household name here. "We've been very successful," says Boris Kuznetsov, manager of the Kiev plant of the 100% U.S-owned subsidiary.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1997 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The steady hum of detergent bottles being swept along an assembly line represents the sweet sound of earnings for S.C. Johnson Wax. After years of turmoil and uncertainty, the Wisconsin-based company has finally turned an early investment in Ukraine into a profitable business. Its Brillo detergent, for example, is now a household name here. "We've been very successful," says Boris Kuznetsov, manager of the Kiev plant of the 100% U.S-owned subsidiary.
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NEWS
March 4, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, encouraged by Ukraine's agreement to dismantle nuclear weapons and its cautious turn toward economic reform, has decided to more than double U.S. aid to the strategically important country, officials said Thursday. Clinton plans to announce the boost, from $330 million to about $700 million, after he has lunch at the White House with visiting Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk today.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Praising President Leonid D. Kuchma as a post-Soviet Franklin D. Roosevelt, President Clinton on Tuesday promised to add $200 million to the U.S. aid program for Ukraine to help pay for the dismantling of the world's third-largest nuclear arsenal and to prop up the nation's sagging economy. If approved by the incoming Republican-dominated Congress, the additional money will increase total U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the presidents of America and Russia raised champagne toasts this week in Moscow to the boldest U.S.-Russian nuclear arms reduction pact ever, they omitted some important people from the guest list: the Ukrainians. The fate of the START II treaty signed Sunday and the reduction of superpower arsenals as a whole now lie in the hands of elected officials in this hilly capital on the Dnieper River. In large part, Ukrainians say, the problem is financial.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton Administration offered Ukraine a package of economic aid and security assurances Monday in the hope of shaping the former Soviet republic's future as a Western-aligned state without nuclear arms. U.S.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Having calmed Western concerns about its nuclear arsenal by agreeing to join the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, Ukraine took its own atomic anxieties to the United States on Saturday as President Leonid D. Kuchma left for a state visit. Speeding up U.S. aid to pay for the dismantling of nuclear warheads and to support Kuchma's market reforms will top the agenda of the two-day summit with President Clinton starting Tuesday.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met with Ukrainian leader Leonid Kravchuk on Wednesday and held out the possibility of a Peace Corps program in the Ukraine as the Administration continued to tread through the minefield of establishing relationships with individual Soviet republics without undermining the fragile central government.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Clinton, on his first visit to Europe since entering the White House almost a year ago, presented his new vision for the Western Alliance in the post-Cold War era Sunday, pledging renewed American leadership and commitment to unite this economically and politically troubled continent.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wooing a new president to comply with the nuclear disarmament agreement signed by his predecessor, Vice President Al Gore paid a six-hour call on Kiev on Tuesday, bearing promises of U.S. aid if Ukraine continues to dismantle its nuclear weapons. Gore also gave newly elected President Leonid Kuchma an invitation from President Clinton to visit Washington in November. The vice president reiterated U.S.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Having calmed Western concerns about its nuclear arsenal by agreeing to join the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, Ukraine took its own atomic anxieties to the United States on Saturday as President Leonid D. Kuchma left for a state visit. Speeding up U.S. aid to pay for the dismantling of nuclear warheads and to support Kuchma's market reforms will top the agenda of the two-day summit with President Clinton starting Tuesday.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wooing a new president to comply with the nuclear disarmament agreement signed by his predecessor, Vice President Al Gore paid a six-hour call on Kiev on Tuesday, bearing promises of U.S. aid if Ukraine continues to dismantle its nuclear weapons. Gore also gave newly elected President Leonid Kuchma an invitation from President Clinton to visit Washington in November. The vice president reiterated U.S.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, encouraged by Ukraine's agreement to dismantle nuclear weapons and its cautious turn toward economic reform, has decided to more than double U.S. aid to the strategically important country, officials said Thursday. Clinton plans to announce the boost, from $330 million to about $700 million, after he has lunch at the White House with visiting Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk today.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before President Leonid Kravchuk signed a historic agreement with the United States and Russia on Friday to give up all of Ukraine's nuclear weapons, the headlines here were scornful. On the morning of the signing ceremony in Moscow, three of Kiev's leading newspapers reported not on the details of the groundbreaking trilateral accord but on what some Ukrainians considered to be condescending behavior by President Clinton during his two-hour visit to Kiev late Wednesday.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Clinton, on his first visit to Europe since entering the White House almost a year ago, presented his new vision for the Western Alliance in the post-Cold War era Sunday, pledging renewed American leadership and commitment to unite this economically and politically troubled continent.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced $330 million in new U.S. aid for Ukraine on Monday after the country's president said he wants to get rid of the more than 1,800 nuclear weapons he inherited from the Soviet Union. But President Leonid Kravchuk also told Christopher that he was not sure that he could get his balky Parliament to go along, and asked for billions of dollars and help in defending his country from Russia in return for further steps toward disarmament, U.S.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States has agreed to provide Ukraine with $175 million in aid to help dismantle its nuclear arsenal after being assured that the former Soviet republic has already begun to disarm some SS-19 strategic missiles, a senior Defense Department official said. The missiles are part of the huge nuclear weapons cache left on Ukrainian territory after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Their dismantling is seen as a step that will allow the congressionally approved aid to begin moving to
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Praising President Leonid D. Kuchma as a post-Soviet Franklin D. Roosevelt, President Clinton on Tuesday promised to add $200 million to the U.S. aid program for Ukraine to help pay for the dismantling of the world's third-largest nuclear arsenal and to prop up the nation's sagging economy. If approved by the incoming Republican-dominated Congress, the additional money will increase total U.S.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States has agreed to provide Ukraine with $175 million in aid to help dismantle its nuclear arsenal after being assured that the former Soviet republic has already begun to disarm some SS-19 strategic missiles, a senior Defense Department official said. The missiles are part of the huge nuclear weapons cache left on Ukrainian territory after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Their dismantling is seen as a step that will allow the congressionally approved aid to begin moving to
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton Administration offered Ukraine a package of economic aid and security assurances Monday in the hope of shaping the former Soviet republic's future as a Western-aligned state without nuclear arms. U.S.
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