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United States Foreign Aid Yugoslavia

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NEWS
November 4, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Wednesday that it will end economic sanctions against Yugoslavia and participate in a massive international aid program to rebuild the war-torn country--provided President Slobodan Milosevic permits free and fair elections. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Washington now hopes to promote democratic change in Serbia, the dominant Yugoslav republic, by showing the population that free elections will bring dramatic improvements in their day-to-day lives.
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NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States said Wednesday that it will make a large pledge at a donors conference Friday to help rebuild Yugoslavia but that payment will depend on Belgrade's further cooperation with a U.N. war crimes court. State Department spokesman Philip T. Reeker, announcing the decision, declined to say how much Washington will give toward the $1.2 billion hoped for by Belgrade, but a source in Congress said the figure now being discussed is $106.6 million.
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NEWS
October 13, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia boasts one of Eastern Europe's best records on free-market reforms and thus does not deserve to be ignored while Congress and the Bush Administration lavish attention on Poland and Hungary, Yugoslav Prime Minister Ante Markovic is telling U.S. officials this week. "What we want is fair treatment," Markovic said in an interview. Unlike Poland and Hungary, Markovic said Yugoslavia is not asking for direct financial aid from the U.S.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Wednesday that it will end economic sanctions against Yugoslavia and participate in a massive international aid program to rebuild the war-torn country--provided President Slobodan Milosevic permits free and fair elections. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Washington now hopes to promote democratic change in Serbia, the dominant Yugoslav republic, by showing the population that free elections will bring dramatic improvements in their day-to-day lives.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States said Wednesday that it will make a large pledge at a donors conference Friday to help rebuild Yugoslavia but that payment will depend on Belgrade's further cooperation with a U.N. war crimes court. State Department spokesman Philip T. Reeker, announcing the decision, declined to say how much Washington will give toward the $1.2 billion hoped for by Belgrade, but a source in Congress said the figure now being discussed is $106.6 million.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and his Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev, said Friday that they have narrowed their remaining differences over proposals to make deep cuts in nuclear arsenals, probably clearing the way for the first arms-control pact of the post-Cold War era, to be signed next week in Washington. Baker and Kozyrev were careful to emphasize that the final decisions will not be made until President Bush and Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States suspended economic assistance to Yugoslavia because of what the State Department termed human rights violations. The United States said it will also oppose any attempt by the Balkan nation to obtain loans or credits from international lending institutions. "Yugoslavia's problems . . .
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday threw solid support behind the economic recovery and reform program of nonaligned communist Yugoslavia, which is struggling with a serious economic crisis. Deputy Secretary of State John Whitehead, during a Belgrade visit, described the new Yugoslav policies aimed at creating a market-based economy as a dramatic moment in Yugoslav history.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Belgrade, the news hit like a Balkan storm: The United States, reports said, was cutting off aid to Yugoslavia, signaling a major policy shift away from supporting unity for the troubled federation. Officials of Communist-governed Serbia quickly denounced the move as part of a U.S.-led plot against them, issuing dire warnings through the state-controlled media. "It is clear that Yugoslavia has entered the closing phase of a special war against it," TV Belgrade announced Tuesday night.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and his Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev, said Friday that they have narrowed their remaining differences over proposals to make deep cuts in nuclear arsenals, probably clearing the way for the first arms-control pact of the post-Cold War era, to be signed next week in Washington. Baker and Kozyrev were careful to emphasize that the final decisions will not be made until President Bush and Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Belgrade, the news hit like a Balkan storm: The United States, reports said, was cutting off aid to Yugoslavia, signaling a major policy shift away from supporting unity for the troubled federation. Officials of Communist-governed Serbia quickly denounced the move as part of a U.S.-led plot against them, issuing dire warnings through the state-controlled media. "It is clear that Yugoslavia has entered the closing phase of a special war against it," TV Belgrade announced Tuesday night.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States suspended economic assistance to Yugoslavia because of what the State Department termed human rights violations. The United States said it will also oppose any attempt by the Balkan nation to obtain loans or credits from international lending institutions. "Yugoslavia's problems . . .
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia boasts one of Eastern Europe's best records on free-market reforms and thus does not deserve to be ignored while Congress and the Bush Administration lavish attention on Poland and Hungary, Yugoslav Prime Minister Ante Markovic is telling U.S. officials this week. "What we want is fair treatment," Markovic said in an interview. Unlike Poland and Hungary, Markovic said Yugoslavia is not asking for direct financial aid from the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday threw solid support behind the economic recovery and reform program of nonaligned communist Yugoslavia, which is struggling with a serious economic crisis. Deputy Secretary of State John Whitehead, during a Belgrade visit, described the new Yugoslav policies aimed at creating a market-based economy as a dramatic moment in Yugoslav history.
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