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NEWS
April 14, 1987 | Associated Press
The independent counsel in the Iran- contra affair has turned over to a court sealed evidence against Albert A. Hakim, an Iranian-American businessman linked to Swiss bank accounts that are central to the investigation, a source said Monday. Independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh submitted the evidence against Hakim last week in U.S. District Court in Washington, said the source, speaking on condition of anonymity.
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NEWS
May 13, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
A prominent 60-year-old Swiss shipping magnate with a secret bank account was the mistaken recipient of the long-lost $10-million contribution to the Nicaraguan contras from the Sultan of Brunei, congressional investigators announced Tuesday. The donation, which was deposited in the wrong Swiss account last August because of a high-level mix-up in account numbers, had been the last major financial mystery of the Iran-contra affair.
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NEWS
March 24, 1987 | Associated Press
An Iranian-American businessman who helped arrange the Iranian arms deals was ordered by a federal judge Monday to testify before the Senate panel investigating the Iran- contra affair. Albert A. Hakim, 50, was ordered by U.S. District Judge Aubrey E. Robinson Jr. to testify under a grant of limited immunity from prosecution. The order takes effect April 10. 20-Day Delay Granted Robinson granted a 20-day delay at the request of Lawrence E.
NEWS
May 9, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
Retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord and his partner, working with a shadowy former Army colonel who later helped them sell arms to the CIA, last year tapped an Iran- contra bank account in Switzerland to invest at least $60,000 in a venture to sell submachine guns to the contras and others, reliable sources said Friday. The gun venture, which at one time anticipated a $1-million profit, was among $350,000 in business spinoffs that Secord and his partner, Albert A.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Senate panel investigating the Iran- contra scandal voted Wednesday to hold retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord in contempt for failing to respond to a subpoena of bank records, starting a process that could leave Secord with the choice of handing over the documents or going to jail. Secord, who reportedly ran a private supply network for the Nicaraguan rebels, is believed to be a key player in the sale of U.S. arms to Iran and diversion of profits to the contras.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
It was, Richard V. Secord recalled for investigating congressmen Wednesday, "a rather acid conversation." Manucher Ghorbanifar, the Iranian middleman in Washington's arms deals with Tehran, had made a deposit in Secord's Swiss bank account and the check had bounced. Secord, a retired Air Force major general who was ramrodding the deals for the White House, said this and other problems with Ghorbanifar left him "very angry." "On the telephone . . .
NEWS
April 21, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Congressional investigators are probing allegations that a secret bank account, maintained by the Pentagon and linked to Marine Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, was used in 1985 to charter a ship that delivered weapons to Nicaraguan rebels, sources said Monday.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Nicaraguan rebels received only $3.5 million of the $18 million from Iran arms sale profits--far less than originally estimated--retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord said Tuesday on the opening day of congressional hearings into the Iran- contra affair.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A $10-million donation from the Sultan of Brunei to Nicaragua's contras went astray last year because Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams gave the sultan the wrong bank account number, U.S. officials said Thursday. Reportedly because a 6 was mixed up with a 7, the sultan transferred the money into the wrong Swiss bank account--apparently leaving an unknown beneficiary $10 million richer.
NEWS
May 9, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
Retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord and his partner, working with a shadowy former Army colonel who later helped them sell arms to the CIA, last year tapped an Iran- contra bank account in Switzerland to invest at least $60,000 in a venture to sell submachine guns to the contras and others, reliable sources said Friday. The gun venture, which at one time anticipated a $1-million profit, was among $350,000 in business spinoffs that Secord and his partner, Albert A.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A $10-million donation from the Sultan of Brunei to Nicaragua's contras went astray last year because Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams gave the sultan the wrong bank account number, U.S. officials said Thursday. Reportedly because a 6 was mixed up with a 7, the sultan transferred the money into the wrong Swiss bank account--apparently leaving an unknown beneficiary $10 million richer.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
It was, Richard V. Secord recalled for investigating congressmen Wednesday, "a rather acid conversation." Manucher Ghorbanifar, the Iranian middleman in Washington's arms deals with Tehran, had made a deposit in Secord's Swiss bank account and the check had bounced. Secord, a retired Air Force major general who was ramrodding the deals for the White House, said this and other problems with Ghorbanifar left him "very angry." "On the telephone . . .
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Nicaraguan rebels received only $3.5 million of the $18 million from Iran arms sale profits--far less than originally estimated--retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord said Tuesday on the opening day of congressional hearings into the Iran- contra affair.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Investigators so far cannot substantiate allegations that a secret Swiss bank account run by a Pentagon intelligence unit helped finance a 1985 weapons shipment to Nicaragua's contras by Marine Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, according to military sources and others close to the inquiry. One source who refused to be identified said that some of the charges, apparently leveled last month by former Army special operations officer William Golden, had been recanted.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
A shadowy and scandal-plagued Army intelligence unit--code-named Yellow Fruit--secretly opened a numbered Swiss bank account that may have been used as a conduit for funds to aid Nicaragua's rebels, a Pentagon official said Tuesday. The official said the bank account at Credit Suisse in Geneva was unauthorized by the Defense Department and the Army command, which did not even know that it existed until last month, when CBS News supplied the Pentagon with the account number.
NEWS
April 21, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Congressional investigators are probing allegations that a secret bank account, maintained by the Pentagon and linked to Marine Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, was used in 1985 to charter a ship that delivered weapons to Nicaraguan rebels, sources said Monday.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
A prominent 60-year-old Swiss shipping magnate with a secret bank account was the mistaken recipient of the long-lost $10-million contribution to the Nicaraguan contras from the Sultan of Brunei, congressional investigators announced Tuesday. The donation, which was deposited in the wrong Swiss account last August because of a high-level mix-up in account numbers, had been the last major financial mystery of the Iran-contra affair.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Investigators so far cannot substantiate allegations that a secret Swiss bank account run by a Pentagon intelligence unit helped finance a 1985 weapons shipment to Nicaragua's contras by Marine Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, according to military sources and others close to the inquiry. One source who refused to be identified said that some of the charges, apparently leveled last month by former Army special operations officer William Golden, had been recanted.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | Associated Press
The independent counsel in the Iran- contra affair has turned over to a court sealed evidence against Albert A. Hakim, an Iranian-American businessman linked to Swiss bank accounts that are central to the investigation, a source said Monday. Independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh submitted the evidence against Hakim last week in U.S. District Court in Washington, said the source, speaking on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | Associated Press
An Iranian-American businessman who helped arrange the Iranian arms deals was ordered by a federal judge Monday to testify before the Senate panel investigating the Iran- contra affair. Albert A. Hakim, 50, was ordered by U.S. District Judge Aubrey E. Robinson Jr. to testify under a grant of limited immunity from prosecution. The order takes effect April 10. 20-Day Delay Granted Robinson granted a 20-day delay at the request of Lawrence E.
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