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BUSINESS
July 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Clinton administration on Monday held out the prospect of expanded opportunities in the United States for foreign banks, securities firms and insurance companies in an effort to achieve similar benefits for American companies in global markets. The administration submitted a new proposal to the World Trade Organization in Geneva, where negotiators are trying to achieve a global trade agreement covering the $40-trillion-plus financial services market by a Dec. 12 deadline.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Clinton administration on Monday held out the prospect of expanded opportunities in the United States for foreign banks, securities firms and insurance companies in an effort to achieve similar benefits for American companies in global markets. The administration submitted a new proposal to the World Trade Organization in Geneva, where negotiators are trying to achieve a global trade agreement covering the $40-trillion-plus financial services market by a Dec. 12 deadline.
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BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
French Firm Buys American Maize: Eridania Beghin-Say of Paris has agreed to acquire American Maize-Products Co. for about $430 million, ending a six-month takeover battle for the corn-processing and tobacco company. Eridania first tried to acquire Stamford, Conn.-based American Maize in January, offering $32 a share. The new purchase agreement is for $40 a share. American Maize shares surged $5 after the announcement to close at $38.75 in heavy trading on the American Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
French Firm Buys American Maize: Eridania Beghin-Say of Paris has agreed to acquire American Maize-Products Co. for about $430 million, ending a six-month takeover battle for the corn-processing and tobacco company. Eridania first tried to acquire Stamford, Conn.-based American Maize in January, offering $32 a share. The new purchase agreement is for $40 a share. American Maize shares surged $5 after the announcement to close at $38.75 in heavy trading on the American Stock Exchange.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
For the past five years, billions of dollars in foreign investment capital has poured into the United States, undergirding the longest peacetime economic expansion in American history. And almost since the influx began, economists have warned darkly that the situation spells inescapable trouble down the road. If foreign investors pull back, as some feared they would after last month's stock market crash, then the U.S. economy will falter, the economists warn.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | Associated Press
Friendly acquisitions of U.S. companies by foreign investors are on the rise, but hostile takeovers by foreigners are still rare, a congressional report says. The General Accounting Office, the investigative and auditing agency of Congress, said foreign acquisitions as a share of all takeovers have increased from 6% in 1984 to 9% last year to 13% in the first half of this year.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
The dollar's unnerving slide and stunning rally--which barely survived its fourth day Thursday--provide a case study of how financial speculators and central bankers throughout the world can drive a nation's currency up and down. But beyond the spectacle of an American symbol gyrating wildly on world markets, the wavering dollar raises important concerns, both economic and political. Its leaps and dives affect what consumers pay for many imported products, from cars to cameras, wine to watches.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after Hanoi and Washington struck a landmark deal to normalize economic ties, two deadlines for signing the formal agreement have passed, raising fears both sides could end up empty-handed after years of tough negotiations. To many political analysts, the delay is confirmation that the debate rages on between reformists and conservatives in the secretive Politburo over the fundamental question of whether Vietnam really wants to commit itself to a free-market economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicaraguan President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, elected just over a year ago on the heels of a debilitating civil war, on Thursday asked U.S. companies to consider doing business with Nicaragua. She assured potential investors that she knows "it is absolutely necessary that peace and democracy exist" before businesses would be willing to take a chance on her country.
OPINION
April 9, 2000 | Bruce Stokes, Bruce Stokes is a columnist for the National Journal and a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations
The end of the Obuchi administration in Japan marks the first phase in the country's torturously slow recovery from the recessionary 1990s. The Japanese economy is again showing signs of life. The Nikkei index has rebounded. The yen is strengthening. Wall Street sharks are bottomfeeding in the Japanese asset market. A new generation of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists has emerged in Tokyo. But the roots of the new economy in Japan are shallow.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
For the past five years, billions of dollars in foreign investment capital has poured into the United States, undergirding the longest peacetime economic expansion in American history. And almost since the influx began, economists have warned darkly that the situation spells inescapable trouble down the road. If foreign investors pull back, as some feared they would after last month's stock market crash, then the U.S. economy will falter, the economists warn.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
A famous American tire company sells off its global factory network to the Japanese. A Canadian developer stalks one of America's premier retailers, throwing the company's plans into turmoil. British, Germans, Japanese and others enjoy a U.S. shopping spree--loading up on companies, real estate and other investments at what seem like fire-sale prices. "I'm sitting in my office in Chicago looking at the new AT&T building, which is being financed by a Japanese company," Gavin R.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Almost as soon as he takes office, George Bush will have to begin dealing with the dark side of Ronald Reagan's international economic legacy--the outsized U.S. trade deficit and the erosion of America's long-standing economic dominance among the Western allies. The prosperity at home during the Reagan years--low unemployment, much-reduced inflation and a record-long economic expansion--helped Bush win the presidential election this month.
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