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BUSINESS
February 4, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Big-company joint ventures, a business trend for the '90s, are springing up like mushrooms after rain. IBM and West Germany's Siemens have formed a venture to produce advanced memory chips; Ford and Japan's Nissan have done the same to produce a minivan, and IBM and Motorola are working on a radio network for computer data. And Washington may bless such ventures: Congress is debating anti-trust changes that would allow U.S.
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NEWS
March 29, 2000 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within three months of his arrival in America, Russian emigre Oleg Popov was playing the big shot. Only 29, he leased a $1.6-million Beverly Hills spread and cruised the streets in an array of flashy cars. He even bought himself a $1.5-million life insurance policy. One year later, in 1994, Popov was reported shot dead in St. Petersburg, Russia's old imperial capital. Popov's ex-wife filed a claim for the insurance proceeds, but Prudential Insurance Co.
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NEWS
June 6, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, who less than two years ago signed the most expensive farm aid bill in history, called Friday for the elimination of agricultural subsidies worldwide by the year 2000 as a way of promoting better world economic health.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eastman Kodak Co. shocked Wall Street on Tuesday by reporting a plunge in foreign sales, and beverage giant PepsiCo warned of tougher times for its foreign operations--reminders that the global economic crisis is increasingly being felt at home. Still, a flurry of third-quarter earnings reports from some of the country's leading consumer product firms showed some strong gains.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1991 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Les McCraw, Fluor Corp.'s chairman and chief executive, is doing his share to rack up frequent-flier miles as part of the Irvine company's intense global marketing thrust. "Nothing happens until you sell something," said McCraw, who took over as chairman from David S. Tappan Jr. in January. "It is very important to stay close to our clients."
BUSINESS
January 24, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART and DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seeking to help the ailing U.S. airline industry find new sources of funds, the Bush Administration reversed itself Wednesday and said it will begin permitting foreign investors to acquire up to 49% of domestic air carriers. The decision allows KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to continue its $400-million investment in NWA Inc., the Eagan, Minn.-based parent of Northwest Airlines.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
When Ohio sheep farmer Joe Hixenbaugh ordered some grazing fences and gates from Kenneth Townsend's small livestock equipment-manufacturing company here a few months ago, he confidently expected that the goods would arrive within a few days. No such luck. After weeks of waiting, Townsend officials finally confessed that it might be several months before the gates would be finished--because they couldn't get the structural steel to make them.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, already facing stiff congressional opposition to plans bolstering the International Monetary Fund and providing "fast-track" trade authority, has decided to back away from a third proposal--a treaty governing international investment. In a major shift, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said the United States did "not envision signing any agreement this April," as initially planned by the United States and other major participants in the talks. The new U.S.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
After a tumultuous market week like the one just ended, it is useful to listen to a slow-speaking, methodical, 72-year-old man with something to say. "Important technological changes have been emerging in recent years that are altering, in ways with few precedents, the manner in which we organize production, trade across countries and deliver value to consumers," Alan Greenspan, Federal Reserve Board chairman, said recently at UC Berkeley.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1996
U.S., Singapore Lead Poll on Investing: The annual survey, conducted by the International Institute for Management and Development in Switzerland, asked about 2,500 international business and finance executives worldwide questions regarding which countries are most desirable for investment. Preliminary results show executives rated the United States as most attractive, followed by Singapore, Britain, Malaysia, Germany, Switzerland and China, the institute said.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
After a tumultuous market week like the one just ended, it is useful to listen to a slow-speaking, methodical, 72-year-old man with something to say. "Important technological changes have been emerging in recent years that are altering, in ways with few precedents, the manner in which we organize production, trade across countries and deliver value to consumers," Alan Greenspan, Federal Reserve Board chairman, said recently at UC Berkeley.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major speech to the financial community here, Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin on Friday set out the opportunities for new growth in the fast-emerging global economy and warned Americans to ignore those who want to push away the outside world. "There are loud and growing voices urging us to turn inward," he said. "We follow them at our peril."
BUSINESS
May 1, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of major U.S. corporations opposed to the spread of citizen activism in foreign affairs filed a constitutional challenge in federal court Thursday of a Massachusetts law banning state purchases from companies doing business in the renegade nation of Myanmar. The lawsuit by the Washington-based National Foreign Trade Council--whose 580 members include most big-name U.S. multinationals, including Myanmar investors Arco and Unocal--claims that such local statutes violate the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, already facing stiff congressional opposition to plans bolstering the International Monetary Fund and providing "fast-track" trade authority, has decided to back away from a third proposal--a treaty governing international investment. In a major shift, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said the United States did "not envision signing any agreement this April," as initially planned by the United States and other major participants in the talks. The new U.S.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of wealthy Asian investors is purchasing the swank 17-story Inter-Continental Hotel in downtown Los Angeles for about $50 million, half of what it cost to build just four years ago, according to industry sources. The 439-room Inter-Continental is the latest Southern California property unloaded by debt-ridden Japanese banks, which took over troubled properties purchased at the peak of the Japanese investment boom in the 1980s. The buyers have primarily been U.S.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In the good old days of the early 1960s to which everyone seems to be looking back these days, mortgages were cheaper and the rich took a bit less of the income pie--although the old and the young were relatively poor. Yet ignorance was bliss perhaps because Americans in those days were much younger--41% of the population was under 21--less educated and more isolated than today. Then everything changed. Interest rates on 30-year mortgages that stood at 5.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiations to make it easier for banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions to do business around the world are on the verge of a breakdown, facing what the chief U.S. negotiator called "too big a gulf" to be narrowed before a deadline tonight.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fed Expands Rule on U.S. Banks' Investments: The Federal Reserve Board approved a rule that expands U.S. banks' ability to invest in foreign companies. The rule, approved by written vote, allows a strongly capitalized and well-managed U.S. bank to invest in a foreign company an amount equal to 5% of its capital without the Fed's prior approval.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1996
U.S., Singapore Lead Poll on Investing: The annual survey, conducted by the International Institute for Management and Development in Switzerland, asked about 2,500 international business and finance executives worldwide questions regarding which countries are most desirable for investment. Preliminary results show executives rated the United States as most attractive, followed by Singapore, Britain, Malaysia, Germany, Switzerland and China, the institute said.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fed Expands Rule on U.S. Banks' Investments: The Federal Reserve Board approved a rule that expands U.S. banks' ability to invest in foreign companies. The rule, approved by written vote, allows a strongly capitalized and well-managed U.S. bank to invest in a foreign company an amount equal to 5% of its capital without the Fed's prior approval.
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