Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Investments Brazil
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Investments Brazil

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | JEB BLOUNT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Next to Daniel K. Ludwig's dreams, Henry Ford's vision of Amazon rubber seems rather puny. In 1967, 40 years after Ford broke ground for Fordlandia, Ludwig, an American industrialist, began developing the Jari Project--a tree farm larger than Connecticut and Rhode Island combined on the north bank of the Amazon, 250 miles west of the Atlantic Ocean port of Belem. Like Ford, Ludwig brought in scientists and engineers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 3, 1997 | Associated Press
The Brazilian subsidiary of Ford Motor Co. said that it will spend as much as $1 billion on a new auto plant in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul. Ford plans to initially invest $500 million and could invest up to another $500 million, depending on details to be worked out with Rio Grande do Sul's state government. The final contract, in which the details will be spelled out, is expected to be signed within the next four months.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Copacabana Palace Hotel, a Rio landmark that once hosted European royalty and Hollywood movie stars but fell on hard times, has been taken over by the American businessman who restored Europe's Orient Express train. "The Copa," on Rio's famous Copacabana Beach on the South Atlantic coast, has been declining for more than 20 years. But James Sherwood has pledged to restore the hotel's glory.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
General Motors Corp. will spend about $1.2 billion in the next four years to build three factories in Brazil, a company spokesman said. The investment is designed to make the largest U.S. auto maker the leader in Brazil as well. Currently, Detroit-based GM, with 22% of Brazil's auto market, trails Germany's Volkswagen and Italy's Fiat, which have 32% and 28%, respectively.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1988 | From Reuters
Brazil and Citibank announced Wednesday that a historic $82-billion debt restructuring package has been completed that will allow the nation to start drawing funds by the middle of the month. The package should enable Brazil to bring back-interest payments to commercial banks up to date and, in turn, boost U.S. commercial banks' fourth-quarter earnings.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | Associated Press
Scott Paper Co. and a Brazilian company have signed an agreement to sell a Brazilian tissue operation that they own jointly for about $40 million. Scott Paper said. Scott owns 49% of Companhia de Papeis, which manufactures bathroom tissue, paper towels, facial tissues and paper napkins. The company is based in Rio de Janeiro. Scott Worldwide, a Scott subsidiary, and Companhia Auxilar de Empresas de Mineracao are selling COPA to a subsidiary of Industrias Klabin de Papel e Cellulosa SA.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1989 | From United Press International
General Motors Corp. said its Packard Electric division will manufacture automotive and telecommunications parts in Brazil by early 1990 through a joint venture with a subsidiary of a Swedish firm.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1989 | From Reuters
Chase Manhattan Corp. and Manufacturers Hanover Corp., benefiting from a stream of back interest payments from Brazil, reported Monday that their profits shot higher in the fourth quarter. Chase Manhattan, the nation's second-largest banking group, said its earnings nearly doubled to $275 million in the October-December quarter from $154 million in the year-ago period. Manufacturers Hanover, ranked No.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM to Invest $2 Billion in Brazil by 1998: The Detroit-based auto maker said it wants to take advantage of the rapidly growing car and truck market in that country. A General Motors Corp. spokesman said the investment by its General Motors do Brasil unit doubles the company's original commitment in Brazil through 1998. General Motors do Brasil has already invested $1.2 billion for this year and next.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | JEB BLOUNT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Heading up the Rio Tapajos from Santarem, where the river's blue-black waters meet the muddy Amazon, a traveler encounters little but the jungle. In the first 100 miles, the only things that disturb the dense forest are a handful of tiny hamlets and the occasional lone thatched hut. The only passable road is the Tapajos itself, and most of its traffic moves by canoe or slow-going, wooden steamer.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | JEB BLOUNT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Next to Daniel K. Ludwig's dreams, Henry Ford's vision of Amazon rubber seems rather puny. In 1967, 40 years after Ford broke ground for Fordlandia, Ludwig, an American industrialist, began developing the Jari Project--a tree farm larger than Connecticut and Rhode Island combined on the north bank of the Amazon, 250 miles west of the Atlantic Ocean port of Belem. Like Ford, Ludwig brought in scientists and engineers.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | Associated Press
Scott Paper Co. and a Brazilian company have signed an agreement to sell a Brazilian tissue operation that they own jointly for about $40 million. Scott Paper said. Scott owns 49% of Companhia de Papeis, which manufactures bathroom tissue, paper towels, facial tissues and paper napkins. The company is based in Rio de Janeiro. Scott Worldwide, a Scott subsidiary, and Companhia Auxilar de Empresas de Mineracao are selling COPA to a subsidiary of Industrias Klabin de Papel e Cellulosa SA.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1988 | From Reuters
Argentina has made some back payments on its $55-billion foreign debt, easing some of the pressure on U.S. banks that otherwise would have had to shift their Argentine loans to a non-accrual status, bankers said. William Rhodes, chairman of Argentina's 11-member bank advisory board, said Argentine central bank director Daniel Marx "has advised me of this (the payments) and I have heard from other banks that they have been receiving funds."
BUSINESS
April 17, 1990 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. said Monday that its 1990 profit could be cut substantially because of Brazil's economic problems, which have forced the big auto maker to temporarily shut down its Autolatina operations serving Brazil and Argentina. "Continuation of the present economic situation in Brazil could have a substantial adverse effect on Ford's earnings," the auto maker said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fernando Collor announced measures Tuesday to help Brazil's automobile industry, nearly paralyzed for the past month by a government austerity program aimed at controlling inflation. Brazilian subsidiaries of General Motors, Ford and Volkswagen put most of their workers on paid leave in late March as a result of the austerity program, which reduced domestic car sales to a trickle while bringing inflation of more than 80% a month down to 0 in April.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their Brazilian automotive operations frozen in place for the last three weeks, General Motors, Ford and Volkswagen are suddenly relearning an old lesson--that there can be a downside to going global. The three auto giants, which dominate Brazil's auto industry, have been forced to shut down all of their car and truck assembly lines throughout the country since Brazil's Draconian anti-inflation measures were put in place by the nation's new president.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|