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United States Foreign Investments Eastern Europe

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NEWS
July 9, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Levi Strauss operation in Poland consists of two empty warehouses, both about the size of a football field, and half a dozen young Polish employees, well-scrubbed and eager, enthusiastic at being a part of this bright new symbol of Western confidence in Poland.
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NEWS
July 12, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poor, polluted Eastern Europe wants the best environmental cleanup that very little money can buy. The ecologically sophisticated new leaders in the old East Bloc admire U.S. environmental technology--particularly from cutting-edge California. U.S. companies are equally attracted to the tattered postcard cities and countryside of a region in which decades of coal-based, inefficient energy use--with almost no environmental controls--have left a startling legacy of contamination.
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BUSINESS
July 10, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, it seemed that something got lost in the translation. When the Bush Administration and Congress set up "enterprise funds" in Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia, they envisioned an Eastern European equivalent of venture capital operations, selectively planting investments that would grow into thriving businesses.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is taking a deliberately slow--and decidedly unenthusiastic--approach toward U.S. participation in a new development bank to help the newly emerging economies of former East Bloc nations. Although Washington has agreed in principle to take part in the venture, the Administration has been reluctant to make any firm commitment on how much financial assistance the United States may eventually contribute.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battles over AIDS, abortion and federal funding for controversial artwork thrust members of the Orange County congressional delegation into the national spotlight during the first session of the 101st Congress last year. This year, the county's congressional representatives are pushing a host of less publicized measures that address concerns about space exploration, freeway congestion, health insurance, Social Security, Eastern Europe, the American flag and Congress itself.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The great foreign investment rush to Eastern Europe is off to a slow--and decidedly cautious--start. As country after country has broken away from Communist domination, headlines have trumpeted a flurry of new ventures in what used to be the Eastern Bloc. Japan's Daihatsu Motor has proposed a plan for producing compact cars in Poland. West Germany's Volkswagen is teaming up with an East German auto maker.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wealthy nations of Western Europe "need a fairly stiff lecture" for failing to move fast enough to open markets to the new democracies of Eastern Europe, "and we've been trying to give it to them," the State Department's second-ranking official said Thursday. In terms unusually blunt for a diplomat, Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger told business leaders that "the European Community, which represents the greatest market for Central and Eastern Europe . . .
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allen Kelly was looking for new markets for his telephone-switching maintenance equipment when the opening up of Eastern Europe rang a bell. The entire former East Bloc was laden with old telephone systems that surely needed cleaning and upkeep, he reasoned. The only problem was, where would he start? Then, the West Los Angeles businessman found out about the U.S. Commerce Department's East European hot-line service and telephoned to see what he could learn.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Eastern Europe began opening its doors to foreign investors 18 months ago, Jan Dvorak knew there were boom days ahead here in Washington. American businessmen would rush to explore opportunities in places like Prague and Budapest; they would need visas, airline tickets, hotel reservations, translation services, office space. Dvorak laid on extra employees at his Washington-based Travisa Inc.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not that the Poles had forgotten how to make kielbasa. They were just making it inefficiently, as one would expect in state-run sausage factories, says 69-year-old Jacob Sobieraj. So the American-born Sobieraj, steeped in the heritage of his parents' homeland, went into the slaughterhouse and hot dog-making businesses with a cousin and friends in the Polish city of Wloclawek.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT and CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Aglow with the free market spirit, the Polish army is going into business with American investors in a venture that propels the concept of airline deregulation to new heights. The unlikely deal-makers plan to convert a small piece of the Polish military into a privately operated regional "feeder" airline offering cargo and passenger flights to smaller Polish cities.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Marriott Corp.'s first move into Eastern Europe--a hotel it opened two years ago in downtown Warsaw--has been, the company says, a rip-roaring commercial success. The Marriott Warsaw's room rates--in the $200-a-night range--and its overall revenues are twice what the firm had planned for, says Nick Ward, Marriott's vice president for international development. "We are wildly enthusiastic," he says.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Levi Strauss operation in Poland consists of two empty warehouses, both about the size of a football field, and half a dozen young Polish employees, well-scrubbed and eager, enthusiastic at being a part of this bright new symbol of Western confidence in Poland.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wealthy nations of Western Europe "need a fairly stiff lecture" for failing to move fast enough to open markets to the new democracies of Eastern Europe, "and we've been trying to give it to them," the State Department's second-ranking official said Thursday. In terms unusually blunt for a diplomat, Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger told business leaders that "the European Community, which represents the greatest market for Central and Eastern Europe . . .
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By reaching from Orange County to Belgrade, SPI Pharmaceuticals Inc. is in the vanguard of U.S. pharmaceutical companies seeking to exploit new business opportunities in Eastern Europe. SPI, a small Costa Mesa drug distributor, last week signed a definitive agreement to form a new joint-venture company with Galenika Pharmaceuticals, Yugoslavia's largest drug and chemical manufacturer.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | DAVID OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Iron Curtain has crumbled over the past several months, local businessmen James Harrell and Paul Armstrong have been devouring all the news they can about the fast-paced changes sweeping the Soviet Union and the rest of Eastern Europe. During the past year, both Harrell and Armstrong have formed separate companies with the idea of tapping the potential created by the extraordinary political and economic changes that have taken place in Eastern Europe.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Solidarity leader Lech Walesa stood before Congress this week and asked for assistance for the ailing economies of Eastern Europe, Carey Vigor-Zierk was sitting at her home computer and working on ways that she might lend a hand. Vigor-Zierk, a third-generation Polish-American, has formed a small company that is trying to obtain computer equipment for Poland's first alternative high school. But she has run into a lot of bureaucratic red tape.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1990 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scramble for Eastern Europe's emerging auto market intensified Wednesday as General Motors Corp. announced initial plans for a third car assembly plant, this one in Czechoslovakia. GM said the Czechs chose it from among several auto firms to negotiate conversion of an existing auto factory to assemble GM Opel cars for local sale and to manufacture 250,000 transmissions a year for export. General Motors, which along with Ford Motor Co.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allen Kelly was looking for new markets for his telephone-switching maintenance equipment when the opening up of Eastern Europe rang a bell. The entire former East Bloc was laden with old telephone systems that surely needed cleaning and upkeep, he reasoned. The only problem was, where would he start? Then, the West Los Angeles businessman found out about the U.S. Commerce Department's East European hot-line service and telephoned to see what he could learn.
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