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NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States will not link India's refusal to sign a global nuclear test ban treaty with burgeoning business ties with New Delhi, U.S. Ambassador Frank Wisner said. India declared last week that it would not sign the proposed Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty being negotiated in Geneva because the pact did not include a timetable for disarmament by the five major nuclear powers, including the United States.
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NEWS
July 12, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When North Carolina-based Cogentrix Energy Inc. headed for India six years ago, it was both pioneer and pilgrim. Pitching a 1,000-megawatt power plant for southern India that could have created hundreds of jobs in the U.S. and supplied electricity to a key swath of this power-starved nation, Cogentrix's Mangalore Power Co. was one of the earliest believers in India's bold economic revolution. It was among the first official "fast-track" projects in the exciting new market in 1992.
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BUSINESS
January 26, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coal-fired electric plant from a sister company of Southern California Edison. Two Boeing jumbo jets. Cable television to brighten Calcutta nights. Those were just some of the more than two dozen deals, memoranda of understanding and joint venture plans signed in a visit to India this month by a high-powered American business delegation led by U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown, who pronounced himself "overwhelmed."
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States will not link India's refusal to sign a global nuclear test ban treaty with burgeoning business ties with New Delhi, U.S. Ambassador Frank Wisner said. India declared last week that it would not sign the proposed Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty being negotiated in Geneva because the pact did not include a timetable for disarmament by the five major nuclear powers, including the United States.
NEWS
February 24, 1989
India has agreed to provide $50 million toward the super collider atom smasher, making it the first foreign nation to commit funds to the $4.6-billion project, a Texas congressman reported. Officials of Japan, Taiwan, Korea and several Western European nations have held preliminary cost-sharing discussions with U.S. officials, Republican Rep. Joe L. Barton told the energy research and development subcommittee of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of women and children who survived the 1984 Bhopal gas-leak disaster, some carrying placards reading "Multinational Murderers Go Scot-Free," marched Tuesday in protest of a reported $500-million settlement between the Union Carbide Corp. and the Indian government. Officials of the two sides have indicated that agreement was near on a settlement in the disaster that left at least 2,600 people dead and more than 200,000 injured.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown oversaw the signing of U.S.-Indian business agreements worth $1.4 billion Monday but reported no progress in persuading India to speed economic reforms. Brown began a weeklong visit to India on Sunday to urge top government officials to open its service sector wider to foreign investment and increase its protection of intellectual property rights.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
A time bomb exploded Tuesday in the lobby of an American bank here, killing an Indian national and injuring 14 others. No Americans were injured. Indian officials have been on the alert for possible terrorist attacks against Americans, but no person or group immediately took responsibility for the blast. It occurred at midday in the crowded lobby of the Citibank, in a new 12-story building in the Connaught Circle district of central New Delhi.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIME STAFF WRITER
In a decision that could have widespread consequences for U.S.-Indian trade ties, officials in Bombay on Thursday ordered a halt to the largest foreign investment venture in India, a $2.8-billion power plant project spearheaded by Enron Corp. of Houston. After reviewing the pioneering but controversial deal, the government of Maharashtra state ordered the immediate stop of construction on the first phase and the outright cancellation of the second phase of the wholly U.S. venture.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIME STAFF WRITER
In a decision that could have widespread consequences for U.S.-Indian trade ties, officials in Bombay on Thursday ordered a halt to the largest foreign investment venture in India, a $2.8-billion power plant project spearheaded by Enron Corp. of Houston. After reviewing the pioneering but controversial deal, the government of Maharashtra state ordered the immediate stop of construction on the first phase and the outright cancellation of the second phase of the wholly U.S. venture.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coal-fired electric plant from a sister company of Southern California Edison. Two Boeing jumbo jets. Cable television to brighten Calcutta nights. Those were just some of the more than two dozen deals, memoranda of understanding and joint venture plans signed in a visit to India this month by a high-powered American business delegation led by U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown, who pronounced himself "overwhelmed."
BUSINESS
January 17, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown oversaw the signing of U.S.-Indian business agreements worth $1.4 billion Monday but reported no progress in persuading India to speed economic reforms. Brown began a weeklong visit to India on Sunday to urge top government officials to open its service sector wider to foreign investment and increase its protection of intellectual property rights.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Investment Bankers to Open in India: CS First Boston tied up with an Indian investment bank and Morgan Stanley won permission to open an office in India, joining a host of international names entering the country to take advantage of its economic reforms. CSFB announced it allied itself with J.M. Financial & Investment Consultancy Services, one of India's biggest private investment banks.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1990 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pepsi-Cola went on sale in India for the first time in 28 years Wednesday after a bitter six-year battle to sell the U.S. soft drink in the tightly controlled Indian market. Pepsi, Seven-Up and Mirinda, an orange soda, hit the market in Jaipur, capital of the western state of Rajasthan, said Christopher Sinclair, president of Pepsi-Cola International. In the coming weeks, the drinks will be sold throughout the country, he said.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1990 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pepsi-Cola went on sale in India for the first time in 28 years Wednesday after a bitter six-year battle to sell the U.S. soft drink in the tightly controlled Indian market. Pepsi, Seven-Up and Mirinda, an orange soda, hit the market in Jaipur, capital of the western state of Rajasthan, said Christopher Sinclair, president of Pepsi-Cola International. In the coming weeks, the drinks will be sold throughout the country, he said.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When North Carolina-based Cogentrix Energy Inc. headed for India six years ago, it was both pioneer and pilgrim. Pitching a 1,000-megawatt power plant for southern India that could have created hundreds of jobs in the U.S. and supplied electricity to a key swath of this power-starved nation, Cogentrix's Mangalore Power Co. was one of the earliest believers in India's bold economic revolution. It was among the first official "fast-track" projects in the exciting new market in 1992.
NEWS
February 24, 1989
India has agreed to provide $50 million toward the super collider atom smasher, making it the first foreign nation to commit funds to the $4.6-billion project, a Texas congressman reported. Officials of Japan, Taiwan, Korea and several Western European nations have held preliminary cost-sharing discussions with U.S. officials, Republican Rep. Joe L. Barton told the energy research and development subcommittee of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
A time bomb exploded Tuesday in the lobby of an American bank here, killing an Indian national and injuring 14 others. No Americans were injured. Indian officials have been on the alert for possible terrorist attacks against Americans, but no person or group immediately took responsibility for the blast. It occurred at midday in the crowded lobby of the Citibank, in a new 12-story building in the Connaught Circle district of central New Delhi.
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