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NEWS
February 6, 1989
Iranian President Ali Khamenei said that diplomatic relations with Washington will not be possible until the United States abandons its hostile posture toward Iran, Tehran Radio said. "There can be no change in our stance against America, unless there is a change in American foreign policy toward Iran," the official broadcast quoted Khamenei as saying.
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NEWS
September 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With ranking U.S. officials in the audience, Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi on Monday called for new cooperation between Tehran and Washington on terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and international narcotics trafficking, while inviting U.S. businesses to play a role in developing Iran's economy.
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NEWS
May 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States and Iran have agreed tentatively to settle more than 2,000 financial disputes that have been a major irritant to relations between the countries since the 1979 Islamic revolution, the State Department said Wednesday. The department issued a brief statement after Tehran Radio reported that U.S. and Iranian negotiators had reached agreement on a package to settle relatively small claims by Americans, mostly businessmen and other private citizens, against the Iranian government.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, one of the Clinton Administration's harshest critics of Conoco's $1-billion contract with Iran, said Sunday he has cut himself off from all consideration of the deal because his former law firm represents the U.S. oil company. Christopher said he decided to recuse himself from the controversy because of his conservative position on conflict-of-interest matters, choosing to avoid even the suggestion of impropriety. U.S.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
It is a system that only a team of lawyers could devise and only Rube Goldberg could love: a complex international structure complete with scores of attorneys, dozens of translators and bank accounts in New York, Algeria, London and the Netherlands. Since its creation in 1981, the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal has labored in relative obscurity to resolve billions of dollars in claims involving Iranian assets. But with U.S.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. decision to free $575 million in Iranian assets was the first product of a concerted behind-the-scenes effort by the Bush Administration to settle issues that could stand in the way of a possible hostage release, Administration officials said Tuesday. But Administration officials warned that there have been numerous false alarms in the past about hostage releases, and many issues remain to be resolved before any of the eight Americans held captive in Lebanon will be freed.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Well before business hours on the morning of Aug. 3, attorney Michael Calabrese was already at work putting the finishing touches on the paperwork for a client who was financing a major new public works project in Iraq. As the 34-year-old lawyer prepared to fax the draft documents to the New York office of his law firm, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, he noticed something that had just arrived on the machine.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, one of the Clinton Administration's harshest critics of Conoco's $1-billion contract with Iran, said Sunday he has cut himself off from all consideration of the deal because his former law firm represents the U.S. oil company. Christopher said he decided to recuse himself from the controversy because of his conservative position on conflict-of-interest matters, choosing to avoid even the suggestion of impropriety. U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Hashemi Rafsanjani, Speaker of the Iranian Parliament, said Tuesday that Iran is prepared to use its influence in Lebanon to try to free American hostages if the Reagan Administration will release Iranian assets frozen in the United States. Rafsanjani, who is considered the second most powerful man in Iran after the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, said on Tehran television that his government wants the United States to make a "tangible gesture" toward Iran.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Fluor Corp. said Friday that it has received about $43 million in a settlement with the National Iranian Oil Co. for unpaid bills on a refinery construction job interrupted in 1979 by the revolution in Iran.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Well before business hours on the morning of Aug. 3, attorney Michael Calabrese was already at work putting the finishing touches on the paperwork for a client who was financing a major new public works project in Iraq. As the 34-year-old lawyer prepared to fax the draft documents to the New York office of his law firm, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, he noticed something that had just arrived on the machine.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Amoco Corp. won $600 million in awards Friday from Iran for facilities seized there during the 1979 Islamic revolution. Two claims totaling $600 million were awarded to the American oil giant, an official of the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal said. It was the biggest settlement in the arbitration body's nine-year history.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States and Iran have agreed tentatively to settle more than 2,000 financial disputes that have been a major irritant to relations between the countries since the 1979 Islamic revolution, the State Department said Wednesday. The department issued a brief statement after Tehran Radio reported that U.S. and Iranian negotiators had reached agreement on a package to settle relatively small claims by Americans, mostly businessmen and other private citizens, against the Iranian government.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
The U.S. government is entitled to some of the money American companies are awarded by an international tribunal created as part of the settlement of the 1981 Iran hostage crisis, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. The justices said the companies' rights are not violated by requiring them--rather than all U.S. taxpayers--to help defray the costs of the claims settlement process. The court upheld a 1985 law that allows the U.S. government to deduct 1.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. decision to free $575 million in Iranian assets was the first product of a concerted behind-the-scenes effort by the Bush Administration to settle issues that could stand in the way of a possible hostage release, Administration officials said Tuesday. But Administration officials warned that there have been numerous false alarms in the past about hostage releases, and many issues remain to be resolved before any of the eight Americans held captive in Lebanon will be freed.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
It is a system that only a team of lawyers could devise and only Rube Goldberg could love: a complex international structure complete with scores of attorneys, dozens of translators and bank accounts in New York, Algeria, London and the Netherlands. Since its creation in 1981, the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal has labored in relative obscurity to resolve billions of dollars in claims involving Iranian assets. But with U.S.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
The U.S. government is entitled to some of the money American companies are awarded by an international tribunal created as part of the settlement of the 1981 Iran hostage crisis, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. The justices said the companies' rights are not violated by requiring them--rather than all U.S. taxpayers--to help defray the costs of the claims settlement process. The court upheld a 1985 law that allows the U.S. government to deduct 1.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
For Wilfried Tillmann, an ambitious, 40-year-old middle-manager at Europe's largest steelmaker, the assignment handed to him in the autumn of 1978 seemed beneath his station: order a simple rubber stamp. But the $2.50 purchase would be one of the most significant and frightening experiences of his career. Tillmann's employer, the respected German industrial giant Thyssen Rheinstahl Technik GMBH, had been building a $1.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Fluor Corp. said Friday that it has received about $43 million in a settlement with the National Iranian Oil Co. for unpaid bills on a refinery construction job interrupted in 1979 by the revolution in Iran.
NEWS
February 6, 1989
Iranian President Ali Khamenei said that diplomatic relations with Washington will not be possible until the United States abandons its hostile posture toward Iran, Tehran Radio said. "There can be no change in our stance against America, unless there is a change in American foreign policy toward Iran," the official broadcast quoted Khamenei as saying.
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