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United States Foreign Investments Japan

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BUSINESS
August 20, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
After pumping $2.7 billion into the United States over the past several years, Shigeru Kobayashi owns a large chunk of downtown Los Angeles and a string of landmark American office buildings. He hobnobs with presidents, dabbles in philanthropy and celebrates his achievements in a high-profile publicity campaign. But he has an image problem at home. Kobayashi, 62, founder and president of the real estate giant Shuwa Corp.
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BUSINESS
July 19, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a deal that could spur Internet use and provide more opportunities for U.S. players in Japan's $130-billion telecommunications market, Tokyo agreed early today to lower the fees that competitors must pay to connect to Japanese homes and offices. The 20% fee reduction over two years was less than Washington wanted but more than Tokyo hoped to relinquish. As such, both sides appeared to blink.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do we Americans really dislike the Japanese? What cause do we have for malice? Who among us has been truly threatened, wronged or otherwise hurt as a consequence of Japan's formidable economic power? These questions have been haunting the rarefied debate over U.S.-Japan relations for years, and now a congressional panel is offering a new high-resolution focus for the quandary: racial bias in the workplace.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. said Friday it will increase its control of struggling Japanese truck and diesel engine maker Isuzu Motors, a move that illustrates both the quickening pace of the auto industry's global consolidation and uncertain times in the Japanese industry. GM, the world's largest auto maker, will raise its ownership of Isuzu to 49% from 37.5% with an investment of $456 million.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
From Tokyo to L.A. to New York, the Japanese are saying black is beautiful. Trade talk is in the air. Japanese endowments to African-American institutions are rising. You can't be cool in Tokyo without Spike Lee's clothes. The mood has changed on both sides since the mid-1980s, when Japanese officials such as then-Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone offended African-Americans with racially charged comments implying that they have lower intelligence.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signs are emerging that Japanese organized crime syndicates are building their presence in the United States, following the huge wave of investment and legitimate business from Japan since the late-1980s, law enforcement officials say. Members of the yakuza , or boryokudan , crime families are starting to spread out from their traditional U.S.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
For more than a century, the red-brick Tennessee Military Institute overlooking this rural town turned out an elite, dedicated corps of young Americans, many of whom went on to success and fortune as soldiers, politicians, doctors and lawyers. Then, like many military schools, it went bust. But now the fortress-like facility is set to turn out a new generation of future leaders--for Japan. Last summer, the 13 buildings and 144 rolling acres that composed the old school were purchased for $2.4 million by the Presbyterian-affiliated Meiji Gakuin (pronounced MAY-gee GAH-kwan)
BUSINESS
October 31, 1989
I was disappointed to read your editorial. As a graduate of South Pasadena High School and a resident of Alhambra, I have friends on both sides of the issue. Beyond the destruction and disruption of a small town that this construction would bring, there is one concern that stands out. That is the problem of the proximity of this proposed link to South Pasadena High. If I were emperor of the universe, it would be a capital crime to even consider placing a freeway near a school.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Japanese auto companies are locating most of their new American plants far from black population centers and are then hiring blacks at rates well below their representation in nearby areas, according to a new study. Blacks are under-represented at virtually every Japanese "transplant" auto factory in the United States, according to a review of Japanese hiring patterns by University of Michigan researchers Robert Cole and Donald Deskins.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1988 | From Reuters
Sharp Corp., saying it is cheaper to make some products in the United States than in Japan, announced Wednesday that it will begin exporting American-made microwave ovens to 11 European countries. The Japanese consumer products company said its U.S. subsidiary, Sharp Electronics, will ship about 60,000 ovens to Europe during the next few months. By the end of next year, the unit is expected to have shipped to Europe 100,000 ovens worth about $12 million. Each oven is 0.6 cubic feet in size.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid worrisome news that several prominent Japanese high-tech companies are beating a retreat from U.S. shores, Japan's largest trading company said Thursday that it is joining Atlantic Richfield Co. in a $200-million project to build the West Coast's first polypropylene plant in Carson. Other Japanese trading firms are expected to follow Itochu Corp. into the United States even as they shut down projects at home and in hard-hit Southeast Asia, according to Arco officials and others.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1998 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. investors hoping that Japan's election surprise on Sunday would be a watershed for Asia's battered financial markets came away disappointed on Monday. While stocks rallied 1.7% in Tokyo, they fell in most other Asian markets. But the yen didn't collapse, as some experts predicted. And on Wall Street, stocks closed mixed in mostly dull trading--suggesting confusion rather than worry or relief. In trading early today, most Asian markets rose modestly, while the yen was stable at about 141.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1997 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese lender that controls Pebble Beach has held recent negotiations to sell the legendary seaside golf resort to an American development group for at least $500 million, said a leading Japanese real estate specialist on Friday.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Walter F. Mondale arrived here as U.S. ambassador in September 1993, he was so hopeful that reform was about to take hold that he persuaded Washington not to impose trade sanctions over Japan's closed construction market. After all, the long-dominant Liberal Democratic Party had lost its majority rule for the first time in 38 years. A new administration was spouting rosy reform plans that would open markets, empower consumers and tame obstructive bureaucrats.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seri Shigekazu, executive manager of the Fukuoka Takarazuka theater, isn't worried at all about his new neighbor, the $5-million, 13-screen AMC multiplex that recently opened just a few blocks away. After all, Shigekazu insists, his aging theater in this night-life district has fans so loyal that they are willing to pay $18 apiece to sink into their not-so-cushy seats. The beer and dried squid are extra.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a shelf in Yoji Yamamoto's office sits a binder with the instructions for reproducing Woody Woodpecker, right down to the correct shade of Dai Nippon paint used to color his bright red topknot. That binder is one piece of MCA Inc.'s strategy as it moves into Japan--true Mickey Mouse territory and the most lucrative foreign market of the powerful Walt Disney Co.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | Wm. K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Further consolidating the $1-billion-a-year music publishing industry, CBS Records has acquired Nashville-based Tree International Publishing, long considered the top country music publisher and the last locally owned publishing company in the country music capital.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High interest rates, falling stock prices and weak property sales are slowing Japan's financial juggernaut. That's of great concern in the United States, where Japanese money has supported everything from the U.S. budget deficit to the expansion of urban skylines. The recent reduction of such investment has been partly responsible for depressing U.S. commercial real estate values and driving up American interest rates, many experts say. And U.S.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1996 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese investors and lenders continued to purge their portfolios of U.S. real estate last year, selling or putting on the auction block $8.9 billion in property, including New York's famed Rockefeller Center, according to a survey to be released today.
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