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United States Foreign Investments Latin America

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BUSINESS
December 9, 1998
J.C. Penney Co., the second-biggest U.S. department store company, expanded its push into Latin America, agreeing to pay $33.3 million for a controlling stake in Brazil's Lojas Renner retail chain. Renner, which operates 21 stores in southern Brazil, had revenue of $210 million last year. The move will help Renner's plans to triple its stores in Sao Paulo, Brazil, to 15 stores by 2000.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Internet entrepreneur Ignacio Kleiman of Miami has plenty of cash, big plans and wide-open market opportunities across Latin America. But he's short on the resource that matters most to his fledgling Internet company: Latino management and technical talent. Like hundreds of other U.S. businesses targeting Latin America, Kleiman's company, I-Network.com, has openings for bilingual executives he can't fill. And efforts to import them have been frustrated by the scarcity of visas and work permits.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1997 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Chairman John F. Smith said Wednesday that the auto maker is undertaking its biggest international expansion in history while stepping up research into a wide variety of advanced-technology vehicles. Smith told reporters at the North American International Auto Show here that GM is pursuing new ventures in the growth regions of Central Europe, Latin America and the Asia-Pacific.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1998
J.C. Penney Co., the second-biggest U.S. department store company, expanded its push into Latin America, agreeing to pay $33.3 million for a controlling stake in Brazil's Lojas Renner retail chain. Renner, which operates 21 stores in southern Brazil, had revenue of $210 million last year. The move will help Renner's plans to triple its stores in Sao Paulo, Brazil, to 15 stores by 2000.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Export-Import Bank Announces Latin America Loans: The U.S. Export-Import Bank loaned $5.2 billion this fiscal year for energy and telecommunications projects in Latin America. Projects in Brazil received the most support from the bank, at $1.8 billion. Work included a $1.3-billion loan for an environmental surveillance program using equipment from Lexington, Mass.-based Raytheon Co. Mexico received $1.4 billion in loans and insurance, including $28.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's Latin America initiative is potentially the most sweeping since the Alliance for Progress of the early 1960s, but it may well be years before it has any major impact, government and private analysts said Thursday. Although Mexico and possibly Brazil may move quickly to take advantage of the trade and debt-reduction benefits that the proposal offers, most other Latin countries are nowhere near being prepared to undertake the kind of economic reforms that it demands in return.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Security Pacific reported strong second-quarter earnings Thursday and a reduction in its troubled Latin American debt. The Los Angeles-based banking company said its net earnings were $154.3 million, the best in its history and a modest improvement over first quarter 1988. The performance looks even stronger when contrasted with the loss of $190.2 million in the 1987 period. However, comparing earnings figures to last year's second quarter is not really significant.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Poised behind his desk, a computer at his fingertips and a large staff at his command, the American executive seemed the prototype of hard-nosed corporate decision-making. Then the phone rang and it became sadly plain that he was master of all except his own life style. "There's this great new restaurant," the executive told his caller. "A friend has invited us for tonight. Can I go?" The caller knew the place. It is crowded, lively, open to the street and in a high-toned suburb.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari's call for immediate renegotiation of Mexico's $104 billion in foreign loans was a low-key, but important warning from Latin America: The United States' current strategy on global debt will have to be changed--and soon. To be sure, the actual words the new Mexican president used in his inaugural address on Thursday did not seem very threatening.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1997 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Chairman John F. Smith said Wednesday that the auto maker is undertaking its biggest international expansion in history while stepping up research into a wide variety of advanced-technology vehicles. Smith told reporters at the North American International Auto Show here that GM is pursuing new ventures in the growth regions of Central Europe, Latin America and the Asia-Pacific.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
Trust Co. of the West, one of Los Angeles' largest money management firms and one of the leading U.S. investors in Latin America, has suffered sharp losses as Latin stock and bond markets have plummeted in recent months. But the $50-billion-asset TCW, long known for taking bigger risks and reaping similarly outsize rewards, appears to be in a much better position with most of its Latin debt than some of its peers, Wall Street sources say.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Export-Import Bank Announces Latin America Loans: The U.S. Export-Import Bank loaned $5.2 billion this fiscal year for energy and telecommunications projects in Latin America. Projects in Brazil received the most support from the bank, at $1.8 billion. Work included a $1.3-billion loan for an environmental surveillance program using equipment from Lexington, Mass.-based Raytheon Co. Mexico received $1.4 billion in loans and insurance, including $28.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin America may, at last, be showing the first signs of emerging from its debt crisis, which poured red ink onto U.S. banks in the late 1980s and created a crisis of confidence in Latin economies. After a 17-month hiatus, Brazil--Latin America's largest debtor nation--announced earlier this month that it would resume interest payments on the $60 billion it owes private banks early next year.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's Latin America initiative is potentially the most sweeping since the Alliance for Progress of the early 1960s, but it may well be years before it has any major impact, government and private analysts said Thursday. Although Mexico and possibly Brazil may move quickly to take advantage of the trade and debt-reduction benefits that the proposal offers, most other Latin countries are nowhere near being prepared to undertake the kind of economic reforms that it demands in return.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
James A. Baker III, acknowledging that the global debt strategy he developed as Treasury secretary is not working, called Tuesday for new action to help Latin American nations reduce their huge debts and to dampen the threat to their democratic governments.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin America may, at last, be showing the first signs of emerging from its debt crisis, which poured red ink onto U.S. banks in the late 1980s and created a crisis of confidence in Latin economies. After a 17-month hiatus, Brazil--Latin America's largest debtor nation--announced earlier this month that it would resume interest payments on the $60 billion it owes private banks early next year.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush unveiled an ambitious plan Wednesday for a "new economic partnership" with Latin America that is designed to boost trade and investment in the region and reduce its staggering debt. He proposed the creation of a hemisphere-wide free-trade zone that would benefit nations willing to move resolutely toward free-market economies.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1989 | PAUL BLUSTEIN, The Washington Post
The Bush Administration is growing deeply concerned about the deteriorating economic and political situation in Latin America and, just as it did 3 1/2 years ago under similar circumstances, the Treasury Department is preparing a new plan for dealing with the Third World debt problem. But this time, the Treasury is putting a heavy emphasis on a relatively new approach--encouraging banks to voluntarily forgive part of the debt owed to them by developing nations.
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