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United States Foreign Investments Libya

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BUSINESS
January 20, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's decision Thursday to let U.S. oil companies return to Libya opens the way for Occidental Petroleum to finally sell off its interests there, a step that would end a turbulent and controversial era for Oxy and its well-traveled chairman, Armand Hammer. Oxy officials refused to comment on the move by the White House or say what the oil, gas and chemical company would do now. But the firm has previously said it is looking for someone to buy its holdings in Libya.
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NEWS
February 6, 1989
More than 100 firms from West Germany, Europe and the United States helped build the chemical plant in Libya that Washington says is intended to produce poison gas, the head of a West German company said. He did not identify any of the firms.
NEWS
February 6, 1989
More than 100 firms from West Germany, Europe and the United States helped build the chemical plant in Libya that Washington says is intended to produce poison gas, the head of a West German company said. He did not identify any of the firms.
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, tacitly admitting that U.S. economic sanctions against Libya gave Col. Moammar Kadafi's regime a huge financial windfall, Thursday authorized five U.S. oil companies to resume operations in the desert nation's rich petroleum fields. State Department spokesman Charles Redman announced Reagan's decision to permit Occidental, Conoco, Marathon, Amerada Hess and W. R. Grace to operate their concessions provided they employ no American citizens.
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, tacitly admitting that U.S. economic sanctions against Libya gave Col. Moammar Kadafi's regime a huge financial windfall, Thursday authorized five U.S. oil companies to resume operations in the desert nation's rich petroleum fields. State Department spokesman Charles Redman announced Reagan's decision to permit Occidental, Conoco, Marathon, Amerada Hess and W. R. Grace to operate their concessions provided they employ no American citizens.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's decision Thursday to let U.S. oil companies return to Libya opens the way for Occidental Petroleum to finally sell off its interests there, a step that would end a turbulent and controversial era for Oxy and its well-traveled chairman, Armand Hammer. Oxy officials refused to comment on the move by the White House or say what the oil, gas and chemical company would do now. But the firm has previously said it is looking for someone to buy its holdings in Libya.
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