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United States Foreign Investments Mexico

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BUSINESS
May 1, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cummins Engine Co. announced Wednesday the second of what Mexican authorities expect will be a flood of export-oriented auto parts plant expansions and openings that will bring $5 billion or more in investment to the country over the next few years. The Columbus, Ind.-based diesel engine manufacturer with $3.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | Associated Press
The United States formally asked the World Trade Organization to appoint a hearing panel to rule on its claims that Mexico is unfairly keeping U.S. companies from competing in Mexico's $12-billion telecommunications market. U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said her office filed a formal request with the WTO in Geneva after discussions with the administration of new Mexican President Vicente Fox failed to produce a breakthrough. U.S.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1995 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's bad news for Mexican consumers is bad news for U.S. retailers who were eyeing Mexico's emerging middle class. Responding to a peso devaluation and an economic crisis in Mexico that has dashed short-term expectations of big profits there, U.S. retailers are re-examining expansion plans and are poised to slam the brakes on their rush to Mexico. Until Mexico's economic crisis, economists saw the U.S.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lured by minuscule taxes, cheap labor and proximity to the U.S. market, corporate America has flocked to Mexico in the last two decades, opening thousands of maquiladora factories in a country hungry for jobs and investment dollars. Now Mexico, brimming with confidence but hard up for money, wants to collect new taxes from the export-driven factories. And that has opened a taxing can of worms. Barring a change in the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican media giant Grupo Televisa's purchase of a minority interest in the largest U.S. Spanish-language television network has focused attention on an aspect of the talks concerning a North American free trade agreement that until now largely had been overlooked: TV station ownership. Since the possibility of a trade agreement was first discussed, Televisa Chairman Emilio Azcarraga has been pressuring for changes in the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1999 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Grupo Gigante, Mexico's third-largest supermarket chain, plans to enter the U.S. market this spring with two stores in heavily Latino East Los Angeles. The Mexico City-based chain, which has been losing a battle to a unit of Wal-Mart Stores on its home turf, sees opportunity in East Los Angeles. "East Los Angeles has a very large Mexican [immigrant] population, and we believe we will have a good niche in that market," said Ignacio Toussaint, head of corporate finance at Gigante.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade of government ownership of Mexico's banks ended Monday when the last of the country's 18 commercial banks was sold to private investors. The sale clears the way for the government to grant concessions for new banks, eventually even to foreigners, under the terms of a free trade agreement now being negotiated with the United States and Canada. Banco del Centro, a regional bank with $1.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its biggest international deal yet, Ingram Micro Inc. said Thursday that it will acquire a majority stake in Mexico's largest domestic distributor of personal computer equipment. The cost of the deal was not disclosed. Ingram, the world's largest computer distributor, said it signed a letter of intent to buy a majority stake in Distribuidora de Computer S.A., known as Dicom.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1994 | Jack Searles
The parent company of Saticoy-based Petoseed Co., a world leader in developing and marketing hybrid vegetable seeds, has signed an agreement to merge Petoseed into a new international agribusiness and biotechnology giant to be controlled by a Mexican conglomerate. Petoseed's owner, privately held Geo. J. Ball Inc. of West Chicago, Ill.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1990 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Happy Star is about to become La Estrella Feliz. The translation is expected to become be official today as Carl Karcher Enterprises Inc. signs a licensing agreement that will result in the opening of at least 10 Carl's Jr. restaurants--with the signature yellow shooting star--over the next five years in Mexico. The agreement with Valores Metalicos, a company based in Monterrey, marks Karcher's first move south of the border and third international venture.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Shadows on the growing economic relationship between the United States and Mexico: Kaufman & Broad, the Los Angeles-based home builder, has decided to pull out of Mexico after six years in which it built relatively few homes, mostly because a country without mortgages offers few home buyers. Pulte Homes of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., has built more than 7,000 multifamily and single-family houses in Mexico--but only because mortgages were subsidized by U.S. employers and the Mexican government.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL and CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a case that illustrates the long reach of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the families of victims of a bus crash that killed 14 maquiladora workers in northern Mexico won $30 million in damages Monday from their U.S.-based employer. The settlement with Salant Corp., a New York-based apparel manufacturer, in an Eagle Pass, Texas, state courtroom sent the message that an employer can be held responsible in U.S. courts for injuries to workers in another country.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeing the potential to stem immigration, California officials are checking out economic development efforts in Mexico that tap immigrants here to finance jobs in their homeland. Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa on Thursday took a detour from his trip pressing the flesh of top Mexican officials to swing by the Jaliscan pueblo of Etzatlan and examine furniture and clothing manufactured with the help of funding by immigrants in the United States.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1999 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Grupo Gigante, Mexico's third-largest supermarket chain, plans to enter the U.S. market this spring with two stores in heavily Latino East Los Angeles. The Mexico City-based chain, which has been losing a battle to a unit of Wal-Mart Stores on its home turf, sees opportunity in East Los Angeles. "East Los Angeles has a very large Mexican [immigrant] population, and we believe we will have a good niche in that market," said Ignacio Toussaint, head of corporate finance at Gigante.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Mexico is now the No. 2 trade partner of the United States, after Canada. In September, the total of exports and imports flowing between the U.S. and Mexico surpassed trade between the U.S. and Japan. It was a turning point, not a fluke. Statistics for merchandise trade--more than $170 billion this year--understate the rapid growth of U.S.-Mexico commerce on many fronts.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH
The boom in Mexico's clothing industry has been built on the relatively simple job of sewing imported pre-cut pieces of fabric into garments. Most of the higher-tech design and cutting jobs have stayed in the United States--so far. But Jose Luis Sorcia, director of the local garment industry chamber in this southeastern city, says Mexican firms want that higher-end work too, especially after the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Kohler Co., the giant plumbing fixtures manufacturer, has begun construction of a highly automated factory on 300 acres near Monterrey, Mexico, that could become one of the nation's largest foreign-owned plants, or maquiladoras , in recent history. Wisconsin-based Kohler, one of the world's top manufacturers of ceramic toilet bowls, sinks, lavatories, bathtubs and urinals, declined to comment on its plans for the recently purchased site.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH
The boom in Mexico's clothing industry has been built on the relatively simple job of sewing imported pre-cut pieces of fabric into garments. Most of the higher-tech design and cutting jobs have stayed in the United States--so far. But Jose Luis Sorcia, director of the local garment industry chamber in this southeastern city, says Mexican firms want that higher-end work too, especially after the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's largest food retailer has acquired a long-vacant commercial property in Arleta with what the city says are plans to open a major supermarket and retail center. Under a deal announced Monday, Mexico City-based Grupo Gigante took over 12.6 acres at the former Gemco property at Van Nuys Boulevard and Beachy Avenue in a purchase and lease agreement.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Sharp Corp. of Japan is doubling its investment in a television and vacuum cleaner assembly plant in Rosarito, Mexico, to $60 million, while two of its suppliers together are investing $40 million in new facilities, Mexican officials said. The appliance manufacturer previously said it would open a plant in October about 20 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border to assemble 1 million TVs and 1.5 million vacuum cleaners a year.
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