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United States Foreign Investments Myanmar

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BUSINESS
February 3, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unocal Signs Myanmar-Thailand Oil Deal: The Los Angeles-based oil company, in partnership with the French oil giant Total and the state oil companies of Myanmar (formerly Burma) and Thailand, have agreed to develop a natural gas field off Myanmar, with production to begin in mid-1998. Earlier this week, Unocal, Total and the Petroleum Authority of Thailand agreed to build a pipeline across Myanmar to send the gas to Thailand. The Rainforest Action Network, Burma Forum and other U.S.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal shareholders cast a strong vote of support Monday for the company's effort to transform itself into a global energy player and overwhelmingly rejected two proposals critical of the company's controversial partnership with Myanmar.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal shareholders cast a strong vote of support Monday for the company's effort to transform itself into a global energy player and overwhelmingly rejected two proposals critical of the company's controversial partnership with Myanmar.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp. President John Imle strolled into the lion's den Friday when he held a surprise meeting in Myanmar with Nobel laureate and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, the most formidable critic of his firm's controversial $1.2-billion pipeline in that Asian nation. Imle's surprise move--praised by opponents of Myanmar's brutal military regime--represents a dramatic turnaround for the El Segundo-based energy company.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dissidents fighting the military regime in Myanmar filed a lawsuit Tuesday in Los Angeles accusing Unocal Corp. of human rights violations and money laundering through its participation in a $1.2-billion pipeline project in the embattled Asian country once known as Burma. The lawsuit--filed in U.S.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from Congress and human rights advocates, President Clinton has decided to ban new U.S. investment in the troubled Southeast Asian nation of Myanmar, several White House officials confirmed Monday night. "It just reached the point where it was time to send a message," one Clinton administration official said, adding that previous sanctions did not appear to have an impact on "continuing repression" by the strong-willed generals who seized control of the country in 1988.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp. President John Imle strolled into the lion's den Friday when he held a surprise meeting in Myanmar with Nobel laureate and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, the most formidable critic of his firm's controversial $1.2-billion pipeline in that Asian nation. Imle's surprise move--praised by opponents of Myanmar's brutal military regime--represents a dramatic turnaround for the El Segundo-based energy company.
NEWS
November 24, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is Saturday morning and a crowd of children is giggling over the televised antics of Tom and Jerry, courtesy of the foreign energy companies that have promised this impoverished fishing village a fast track to the 21st century. But France's Total and El Segundo, Calif.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motorola Inc., Swedish giant LM Ericsson and Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries share one thing that has put them on a collision course with a tough new law passed by the city of San Francisco. They're accused of doing business in a troubled Southeast Asian nation called Myanmar, which could jeopardize their bids for a $40-million emergency radio communications system and a $140-million light rail system for San Francisco International Airport.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp. is no stranger to the volatile mix of foreign dictators, political unrest and developing economies. Over the past three decades, the Southern California energy giant has weathered a military crackdown in Indonesia after an aborted Communist rebellion in 1965, the overthrow of Philippine strongman Ferdinand Marcos in 1986 and a succession of peaceful, and not so peaceful, coups in Thailand.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from Congress and human rights advocates, President Clinton has decided to ban new U.S. investment in the troubled Southeast Asian nation of Myanmar, several White House officials confirmed Monday night. "It just reached the point where it was time to send a message," one Clinton administration official said, adding that previous sanctions did not appear to have an impact on "continuing repression" by the strong-willed generals who seized control of the country in 1988.
NEWS
November 24, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is Saturday morning and a crowd of children is giggling over the televised antics of Tom and Jerry, courtesy of the foreign energy companies that have promised this impoverished fishing village a fast track to the 21st century. But France's Total and El Segundo, Calif.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motorola Inc., Swedish giant LM Ericsson and Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries share one thing that has put them on a collision course with a tough new law passed by the city of San Francisco. They're accused of doing business in a troubled Southeast Asian nation called Myanmar, which could jeopardize their bids for a $40-million emergency radio communications system and a $140-million light rail system for San Francisco International Airport.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dissidents fighting the military regime in Myanmar filed a lawsuit Tuesday in Los Angeles accusing Unocal Corp. of human rights violations and money laundering through its participation in a $1.2-billion pipeline project in the embattled Asian country once known as Burma. The lawsuit--filed in U.S.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp. is no stranger to the volatile mix of foreign dictators, political unrest and developing economies. Over the past three decades, the Southern California energy giant has weathered a military crackdown in Indonesia after an aborted Communist rebellion in 1965, the overthrow of Philippine strongman Ferdinand Marcos in 1986 and a succession of peaceful, and not so peaceful, coups in Thailand.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unocal Signs Myanmar-Thailand Oil Deal: The Los Angeles-based oil company, in partnership with the French oil giant Total and the state oil companies of Myanmar (formerly Burma) and Thailand, have agreed to develop a natural gas field off Myanmar, with production to begin in mid-1998. Earlier this week, Unocal, Total and the Petroleum Authority of Thailand agreed to build a pipeline across Myanmar to send the gas to Thailand. The Rainforest Action Network, Burma Forum and other U.S.
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