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United States Foreign Investments Panama

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NEWS
January 26, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress indicated Thursday that it will act promptly to approve the $1.1-billion package of aid to Panama that President Bush has proposed, providing what the President called "as close to instant relief as we can hope" for Panama's battered economy.
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NEWS
January 26, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress indicated Thursday that it will act promptly to approve the $1.1-billion package of aid to Panama that President Bush has proposed, providing what the President called "as close to instant relief as we can hope" for Panama's battered economy.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON and BRUCE KEPPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
American companies in Panama shut their offices Wednesday and checked on employees' safety, as the U.S. military's attack sent the Central American nation's deeply troubled economy into chaos. With sporadic fighting continuing, Panama's main airport remained shut to commercial traffic, and the Panama Canal was closed for most of the day, its first combat-related closure in 75 years. A spot check of U.S.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. forces in Panama have found personal records of deposed strongman Manuel A. Noriega that could help investigators find millions of dollars in illicit drug profits that he has stashed around the world, including possible investments in U.S. real estate, Justice Department officials said Friday. The Treasury Department has joined the effort by appealing to foreign governments under terms of U.S. treaty agreements to freeze any identifiable assets of Noriega's, the officials said.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
If stringent new U.S. economic regulations are interpreted narrowly, the 450 American companies doing business in Panama will not even be allowed to pay their light and telephone bills or buy postage stamps. Under such conditions, American firms operating here agree, they will have no choice but to close. Previous U.S. steps aimed at ousting strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega have already ravaged an economy that once offered one of the most attractive investment climates in Latin America.
NEWS
October 9, 1988
Most U.S. companies that have operations in Panama are ignoring President Reagan's order to withhold taxes they owe the Central American government as a means of pressuring strongman Manuel A. Noriega to step down, a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee said. Reagan issued the order last April with the stipulation that the money be placed in a Treasury Department escrow account and turned over to Panama only after Gen. Noriega was out. However, Rep. Sam Gejdenson (D-Conn.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, imposing new sanctions against Panama, has decided to outlaw all financial dealings by U.S. citizens with strongman Manuel A. Noriega, his wife and 32 Panamanian companies in which they own shares, officials said Thursday. The measure, scheduled to be announced next week, is the first of several new actions planned by U.S. officials to increase pressure on Noriega himself, rather than the Panamanian economy as a whole, the officials said.
NEWS
September 5, 1989
The United States has placed more than 150 Panamanian officials on a blacklist, forbidding U.S. companies and government agencies from buying from them or their businesses. U.S. Embassy officials said the action is intended to "hurt the pocketbooks" of people associated with Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, who has been indicted by two federal grand juries in Florida on drug-trafficking charges. The measure affects Panamanian officials who own companies that do business with the U.S.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. forces in Panama have found personal records of deposed strongman Manuel A. Noriega that could help investigators find millions of dollars in illicit drug profits that he has stashed around the world, including possible investments in U.S. real estate, Justice Department officials said Friday. The Treasury Department has joined the effort by appealing to foreign governments under terms of U.S. treaty agreements to freeze any identifiable assets of Noriega's, the officials said.
NEWS
March 5, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration, seeking to maintain an economic stranglehold on Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega's military regime, Friday put diplomatic pressure on Japan not to recognize Noriega's rule and warned Americans that "unsettled conditions" make travel to Panama potentially dangerous. The U.S. actions came as supporters of Eric A.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON and BRUCE KEPPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
American companies in Panama shut their offices Wednesday and checked on employees' safety, as the U.S. military's attack sent the Central American nation's deeply troubled economy into chaos. With sporadic fighting continuing, Panama's main airport remained shut to commercial traffic, and the Panama Canal was closed for most of the day, its first combat-related closure in 75 years. A spot check of U.S.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, imposing new sanctions against Panama, has decided to outlaw all financial dealings by U.S. citizens with strongman Manuel A. Noriega, his wife and 32 Panamanian companies in which they own shares, officials said Thursday. The measure, scheduled to be announced next week, is the first of several new actions planned by U.S. officials to increase pressure on Noriega himself, rather than the Panamanian economy as a whole, the officials said.
NEWS
September 5, 1989
The United States has placed more than 150 Panamanian officials on a blacklist, forbidding U.S. companies and government agencies from buying from them or their businesses. U.S. Embassy officials said the action is intended to "hurt the pocketbooks" of people associated with Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, who has been indicted by two federal grand juries in Florida on drug-trafficking charges. The measure affects Panamanian officials who own companies that do business with the U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1989
Because of exceptions intended to ease the impact on American businesses, the Panamanian government is expected to receive more than half the money it was to have been denied under U.S. economic sanctions, the General Accounting Office reported. The congressional watchdog agency said the U.S. Treasury, responding to hundreds of appeals from businesses in the United States and Panama, authorized 46 exceptions allowing certain types of payments to the regime of strongman Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
If stringent new U.S. economic regulations are interpreted narrowly, the 450 American companies doing business in Panama will not even be allowed to pay their light and telephone bills or buy postage stamps. Under such conditions, American firms operating here agree, they will have no choice but to close. Previous U.S. steps aimed at ousting strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega have already ravaged an economy that once offered one of the most attractive investment climates in Latin America.
NEWS
March 5, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration, seeking to maintain an economic stranglehold on Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega's military regime, Friday put diplomatic pressure on Japan not to recognize Noriega's rule and warned Americans that "unsettled conditions" make travel to Panama potentially dangerous. The U.S. actions came as supporters of Eric A.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, escalating its campaign of economic pressure against the military regime in Panama, is preparing a presidential order to freeze most Panamanian assets in the United States, officials said Thursday. At the same time, supporters of Panama's deposed civilian president acted to seize more of their government's properties, including Air Panama jetliners and revenues from the oil pipeline that crosses the Central American isthmus.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, escalating its campaign of economic pressure against the military regime in Panama, is preparing a presidential order to freeze most Panamanian assets in the United States, officials said Thursday. At the same time, supporters of Panama's deposed civilian president acted to seize more of their government's properties, including Air Panama jetliners and revenues from the oil pipeline that crosses the Central American isthmus.
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