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United States Foreign Investments Poland

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NEWS
July 9, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Levi Strauss operation in Poland consists of two empty warehouses, both about the size of a football field, and half a dozen young Polish employees, well-scrubbed and eager, enthusiastic at being a part of this bright new symbol of Western confidence in Poland.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1997
Fluor Daniel said Thursday it has received two contracts valued at $30 million to manage a $400-million refinery modernization project in Poland. Fluor Daniel is serving as managing contractor with Polish partners Prosynchem and Prochem for the Rafineria Gdanska S.A. project. They will manage design, procurement and construction of a hydrocracker, hydrogen plant, sulfur plant and other units.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Unit Expects to Sign Polish Car Contract: General Motors Corp. subsidiary Adam Opel and the Polish government expect to complete the contract in early 1996 for a new Opel factory, government officials said in Warsaw. Both sides are attempting to reach final agreement by the end of January, with discussions addressing "almost every detail of the entire project," according to Tadeusz Soroka, Poland's trade and industry minister.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Unit Expects to Sign Polish Car Contract: General Motors Corp. subsidiary Adam Opel and the Polish government expect to complete the contract in early 1996 for a new Opel factory, government officials said in Warsaw. Both sides are attempting to reach final agreement by the end of January, with discussions addressing "almost every detail of the entire project," according to Tadeusz Soroka, Poland's trade and industry minister.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounding a note of cheerful capitalism Friday night, Polish President Lech Walesa praised the American taxpayers' commitment to freedom, saying he was offering the American public a chance to recover what it has invested in the cause of Polish democracy.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The gray steel gates of the Lenin Shipyard, where President Bush spoke on Tuesday, are Poland's most vivid symbol of popular revolt against communism. It was here, in 1980, that workers rose up to demand more say in their own lives; over this fence clambered a militant electrician named Lech Walesa to turn the uprising into a movement called Solidarity. But now the rusty, sprawling plant is about to become a symbol of another kind of change.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1997
Fluor Daniel said Thursday it has received two contracts valued at $30 million to manage a $400-million refinery modernization project in Poland. Fluor Daniel is serving as managing contractor with Polish partners Prosynchem and Prochem for the Rafineria Gdanska S.A. project. They will manage design, procurement and construction of a hydrocracker, hydrogen plant, sulfur plant and other units.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Firm to Establish Poland's First Mutual Fund: Poles this spring will be able to invest in their country's first mutual fund, according to the fund's U.S. owner, Pioneer Group Inc. Pioneer Polish Equity Fund became the first mutual fund chartered by Poland's State Securities Commission on Feb. 28. Shares in the fund should go on sale in May, the company said.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. and the Republic of Poland announced a $75-million project to assemble GM's Opel-designed cars at a plant near Warsaw, one of the biggest investments by a U.S. company in that Eastern European nation. The project--GM's fourth manufacturing venture in Eastern Europe--reflects the stark contrast between the fortunes of the auto maker's GM Europe unit, which is gaining market share and making profits, and GM's shrinking, money-losing U.S. vehicle business.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT and CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Aglow with the free market spirit, the Polish army is going into business with American investors in a venture that propels the concept of airline deregulation to new heights. The unlikely deal-makers plan to convert a small piece of the Polish military into a privately operated regional "feeder" airline offering cargo and passenger flights to smaller Polish cities.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Levi Strauss operation in Poland consists of two empty warehouses, both about the size of a football field, and half a dozen young Polish employees, well-scrubbed and eager, enthusiastic at being a part of this bright new symbol of Western confidence in Poland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounding a note of cheerful capitalism Friday night, Polish President Lech Walesa praised the American taxpayers' commitment to freedom, saying he was offering the American public a chance to recover what it has invested in the cause of Polish democracy.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
With his back to a stark monument to workers slain in anti-government strikes, and his eyes gazing across a sea of hopeful faces and fluttering American and Polish flags, President Bush on Tuesday delivered an emotional plea for freedom and democracy on the site where the Solidarity trade union was born.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. and the Republic of Poland announced a $75-million project to assemble GM's Opel-designed cars at a plant near Warsaw, one of the biggest investments by a U.S. company in that Eastern European nation. The project--GM's fourth manufacturing venture in Eastern Europe--reflects the stark contrast between the fortunes of the auto maker's GM Europe unit, which is gaining market share and making profits, and GM's shrinking, money-losing U.S. vehicle business.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Polish President Lech Walesa threw open Poland's doors to Americans on Thursday, saying they would no longer need visas to visit his country as of April 15. Polish officials said the move was a special gesture to American businesses to spur investment in the country. Poland is struggling to establish a market economy after decades of communism.
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