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United States Foreign Investments South Africa

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Student activists who claim they were beaten by USC security guards and Los Angeles police officers when they tried to deliver a protest letter to school officials filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit Wednesday against the university and the city of Los Angeles.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The huge sign out front says Toys R Us, and the long aisles inside are crammed with customers amid a children's wonderland of toys, books, games and clothes. There's only one problem. The $7.9-billion New Jersey-based toy retailer, with operations in 12 countries worldwide, has no legal ties to this store--or the two other busy "Toys R Us" outlets in South Africa. A local businessman simply copied the well-known logo in 1978 and opened shops almost identical to the American originals.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merrill Lynch's decision last week to eliminate the last of its business connections with South Africa, including trading South African stocks, highlights an unexpected role that the City of Los Angeles increasingly is playing--that of primary municipal policeman of South African divestment.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
EDS Forms Joint Venture in South Africa: Electronic Data Systems Corp. said it entered the African market by forming an information technology services venture with Dimension Data Holdings Ltd. of South Africa. Financial terms were not disclosed. EDS, a major provider of information technology services, is a unit of General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1988 | Associated Press
About 1,270 companies from 20 Western countries are doing business in South Africa but 188 companies from seven countries have pulled out, according to a survey published Monday. The International Confederation of Free Trade Unions survey said Britain led the field with 374 companies still operating in South Africa. It said the United States led the countries that pulled out with 134 companies.
SPORTS
May 16, 1988 | Randy Harvey
One reason the Amateur Basketball Assn. of the USA closed the Olympic men's trials to the media this week in Colorado Springs was to avoid the second-guessing that occurred in 1984, when Auburn's Charles Barkley was not named to the team despite one of his uniquely brilliant performances. "We don't want Dick Vitale picking our team," said Bill Wall, ABAUSA's executive director.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | Associated Press
The Rev. Leon H. Sullivan, saying his widely used fair-employment principles have failed to bring an end to South Africa's apartheid, called on nearly 200 American businesses Wednesday to pull out of that nation within nine months. Sullivan, a Philadelphia Baptist minister whose 10-year-old code of conduct has become the standard for U.S. companies in South Africa, also said he wants the U.S. government to enact an economic embargo against South Africa.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
EDS Forms Joint Venture in South Africa: Electronic Data Systems Corp. said it entered the African market by forming an information technology services venture with Dimension Data Holdings Ltd. of South Africa. Financial terms were not disclosed. EDS, a major provider of information technology services, is a unit of General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
PepsiCo Inc. to Return to South Africa: The soft drink giant, which pulled out of the country in 1985 because of anti-apartheid sanctions, said it will form a local bottling joint venture in which black investors will hold a majority stake, and that it plans to expand into other countries in the region. Pepsi would not disclose the value and certain other details of the investment, citing competitive reasons. Egoli Beverages, a U.S.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, determined to prevent the failure of South Africa's experiment in multiracial democracy, will try to persuade American businesses, pension funds and other institutions to pour billions of dollars into the country's fragile economy after next month's elections, officials said Tuesday. The White House decided to build its South Africa policy around private investment because the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1994 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. companies will lose out on investment opportunities in the new South Africa--deals that their Japanese and European counterparts will seize--unless American business becomes more aggressive, South Africa's U.S. ambassador said Tuesday in Los Angeles. Although U.S.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kentucky Fried Chicken Reinvests in South Africa: The company said it will invest $200 million in South Africa in the next three years, building 200 restaurants and encouraging entrepreneurs in black townships. Bob Bothwell, regional vice president of KFC's South Pacific-South Africa region, said the expansion will provide jobs to more than 6,000 South Africans. Louisville, Ky.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, determined to prevent the failure of South Africa's experiment in multiracial democracy, will try to persuade American businesses, pension funds and other institutions to pour billions of dollars into the country's fragile economy after next month's elections, officials said Tuesday. The White House decided to build its South Africa policy around private investment because the U.S.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
University of California regents voted Thursday to rescind their once-controversial policy banning investments in companies that do business in South Africa, freeing university officials to invest in more than 700 firms that have been off limits.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American corporations are rethinking the South African market in the wake of Friday's call by the African National Congress to lift economic sanctions, but most are not expected to make new investments until the South African political situation is more stable. "Companies will want the new government to establish a pro-business policy and put an end to the violence in South Africa," said Daniel O'Flaherty, executive director of the Washington-based U.S.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just over a mountain range from the sea, on a dusty plain beneath rouge-tinted hills, a few hundred white South Africans have long nurtured the world's largest ostrich farms--and chafed under years of sanctions that barred them from the American market. But now, their ostrich-skin cowboy boots, with price tags of $1,000 and up, are available across the United States. So are billfolds, golf bags and pocketbooks made from the exotic, pockmarked skin of South Africa's gawky, contrary bird.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An emotional Assembly Speaker Willie Brown fended off persistent questions about his private law practice Tuesday by charging that scrutiny directed at him is racially motivated. "It's tough being black, mister, it really is," Brown said at a press conference, insisting that he has been a subject of inquiry by reporters and federal investigators because he is black, successful and a Democrat.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
Sixteen U.S. companies have opened offices or otherwise established economic links to South Africa in the last 1 1/2 years, reversing the "disinvestment" trend of the late 1980s, a research firm said Wednesday. The Investor Responsibility Research Center Inc. in Washington said the new investments were facilitated by then-President Bush's 1991 executive order repealing a ban on new U.S. investment in South Africa. That ban was included in the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986.
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