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United States Foreign Investments South America

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BUSINESS
March 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ford to Boost South American Operations: The Dearborn, Mich.-based auto maker may spend as much as $2.5 billion by 2000 to modernize plants in Brazil and begin producing its Fiesta compact car, Chief Executive Alex Trotman said this week. He also said the company plans to spend about $1 billion in Argentina in the next five years in a bid to recover its leadership in the market and make vehicles there for export.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ford to Boost South American Operations: The Dearborn, Mich.-based auto maker may spend as much as $2.5 billion by 2000 to modernize plants in Brazil and begin producing its Fiesta compact car, Chief Executive Alex Trotman said this week. He also said the company plans to spend about $1 billion in Argentina in the next five years in a bid to recover its leadership in the market and make vehicles there for export.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PETER D. MOORE, PETER D. MOORE is a managing partner of Inferential Focus, a market-intelligence firm based in New York
Since 1985, the New York Times/CBS News Poll has asked: "What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?" At the end of 1987, a mere 2% responded "drugs." By July, 1989, that figure had risen to 22%. In September, 1989, launched by President Bush's declaration of a "war on drugs," the public's concern soared to 64%. In only two years, drugs had moved from the periphery of U.S. consciousness to become the omnipresent corrupter of youth.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The climate of violence might discourage many foreign investors from coming here, but it can be an attractive environment for a company like American Security. The U.S.-based firm armors cars in Colombia, making them bulletproof and even bomb-resistant. The more violent the environment, the better the business for American Security. "It's a cyclical business," David Stone, one of the two owners, said at American Security's Miami headquarters.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The climate of violence might discourage many foreign investors from coming here, but it can be an attractive environment for a company like American Security. The U.S.-based firm armors cars in Colombia, making them bulletproof and even bomb-resistant. The more violent the environment, the better the business for American Security. "It's a cyclical business," David Stone, one of the two owners, said at American Security's Miami headquarters.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PETER D. MOORE, PETER D. MOORE is a managing partner of Inferential Focus, a market-intelligence firm based in New York
Since 1985, the New York Times/CBS News Poll has asked: "What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?" At the end of 1987, a mere 2% responded "drugs." By July, 1989, that figure had risen to 22%. In September, 1989, launched by President Bush's declaration of a "war on drugs," the public's concern soared to 64%. In only two years, drugs had moved from the periphery of U.S. consciousness to become the omnipresent corrupter of youth.
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