Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Investments Third World
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Investments Third World

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994 | From Associated Press
GE Capital Corp. and the fund group headed by George Soros, the Wall Street billionaire and philanthropist, are joining forces to invest in electric power plants in developing countries, the two sides announced Monday. The new Global Power Investments will raise at least $2.5 billion and invest it in building or running privately owned power plants, the partners said. The fund will initially focus on Mexico and Asia, particularly China, India and Indonesia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994 | From Associated Press
GE Capital Corp. and the fund group headed by George Soros, the Wall Street billionaire and philanthropist, are joining forces to invest in electric power plants in developing countries, the two sides announced Monday. The new Global Power Investments will raise at least $2.5 billion and invest it in building or running privately owned power plants, the partners said. The fund will initially focus on Mexico and Asia, particularly China, India and Indonesia.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Security Pacific said Monday that it has set aside an additional $350 million to cover potential losses on loans to less developed countries, a conservative step that analysts said reflected the banking company's overall financial strength. The action by Security Pacific of Los Angeles, the nation's seventh-largest bank holding company, is expected to put pressure on other big banks to increase provisions for potential losses on loans to developing countries, according to analysts.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the first report cards on the Bush Administration emerged early last year, Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady was at the head of the class--hailed for his plans to restructure Third World debt and bail out the nation's troubled savings and loan industry. Now, barely a year later, Brady's grades appear to have plummeted. His once-admired initiatives face mounting criticism.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady's controversial new plan for reducing the Third World's debt burden will go before the Cabinet this week to face vigorous challenges from the State Department and the White House National Security Council.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Five years ago this month, the long climb of stock prices we call the bull market began. As measured by such indexes as the Standard & Poor's 500 or the Dow Jones industrial average, stock prices have more than tripled since August, 1982. But many investors stopped cheering long ago and started worrying about how and when the party would end. Would there be a crash? Was it time to sell? There were and are no good answers, as you might expect, because nobody can truly predict the market.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady's controversial new plan for reducing the Third World's debt burden won formal presidential backing Tuesday but officials said it is likely to require more "development" and will be put into effect only slowly. At a 90-minute meeting, a Cabinet-level review group headed by President Bush technically endorsed the Brady proposals.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady's controversial new plan for reducing the Third World's debt burden will go before the Cabinet this week to face vigorous challenges from the State Department and the White House National Security Council.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
James A. Baker III, acknowledging that the global debt strategy he developed as Treasury secretary is not working, called Tuesday for new action to help Latin American nations reduce their huge debts and to dampen the threat to their democratic governments.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The world's big banks, seeking to blunt growing demands that they forgive much of the debt owed by Third World countries, offered Wednesday to write off more of such loans--but only if the United States and other countries provide them with new incentives.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
U.S. banks have sharply reduced their exposure in debt-ridden Third World nations and are no longer seriously threatened by possible failure of their loans to developing countries, optimistic federal regulators said Thursday. "The vulnerability of the U.S. banking system . . . has lessened significantly," Robert L. Clarke, comptroller of the currency, told the House Banking Committee.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
President-elect George Bush signaled Monday that he plans to make overhauling the United States' current Third World debt strategy a top priority of his Administration--a step that could have important implications for U.S. relations with Latin America. At a news conference, Bush said he plans to conduct "a major review" of the U.S. debt policy, "not just (by) the Treasury, but (by) our national security people" as well.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
President-elect George Bush signaled Monday that he plans to make overhauling the United States' current Third World debt strategy a top priority of his Administration--a step that could have important implications for U.S. relations with Latin America. At a news conference, Bush said he plans to conduct "a major review" of the U.S. debt policy, "not just (by) the Treasury, but (by) our national security people" as well.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
U.S. banks have sharply reduced their exposure in debt-ridden Third World nations and are no longer seriously threatened by possible failure of their loans to developing countries, optimistic federal regulators said Thursday. "The vulnerability of the U.S. banking system . . . has lessened significantly," Robert L. Clarke, comptroller of the currency, told the House Banking Committee.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
It was not your typical international banking transaction. Twelve businessmen and government officials were standing outside the home of a high-ranking Honduran bureaucrat in the capital of Tegucigalpa last spring. He had left his sick bed to come outside and sign the documents closing a novel $10-million deal. Suddenly the group's focus shifted from the papers to a man coming down the street. He was staggering and appeared to be drunk. He also was waving a revolver in the air.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|