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BUSINESS
August 3, 1991 | HAL FOSTER
A Los Angeles company that makes equipment for dams and other electrical power-generating facilities has entered into a joint venture with two Soviet companies to market large Soviet-built generators and turbines in the United States. Magnetek Inc. is the No. 1 builder of medium-power transformers in the United States, but does not manufacture the industry's biggest power devices--generators and turbines.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SPI Pharmaceuticals Inc., continuing its aggressive expansion into Eastern Europe, said Thursday that it has tentatively agreed to form a joint venture with one of Russia's oldest drug manufacturers. SPI, which is 70% owned by ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. in Costa Mesa, did not disclose financial details of its agreement with Oktyabr Pharmaceutical Factories, a St. Petersburg company founded in the year 1714.
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NEWS
July 13, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virtually unnoticed among the many superpower negotiations, the United States and Soviet Union are trying to settle U.S. claims of more than $1 billion on debts that predate the Bolshevik Revolution, including old czarist bonds bought by Americans. Recent U.S.-Soviet commercial talks have focused on Soviet efforts to obtain most-favored-nation trading status, which would enable the Soviets to get the U.S. government credits and loans they need to resuscitate their economy.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1991 | HAL FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Magnetek, the Los Angeles-based electrical equipment maker, wrote a new chapter in U.S.-Soviet joint ventures a few months ago with the startling announcement that it would sell Soviet turbines and generators to American operators of hydroelectric dams. The agreement with two Soviet companies marked the first time that a major U.S.-Soviet deal would focus on products for the U.S.--rather than the Soviet--market.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Combustion Engineering Inc. announced in Moscow on Wednesday that it had reached an agreement to help build and manage a multibillion-dollar petrochemical complex in two Western Siberian cities. This is the Stamford-based company's second deal with the Soviet Union in the last six months. In November, the company announced the first Soviet-American joint venture established under the Soviet Union's new policy allowing Western concerns to own a share of Soviet industries.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1990 | JOHN CUNNIFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Radisson Hotel people are shipping in the furniture, computers and facsimile machines in preparation for the fall opening of the first American-managed hotel in the Soviet Union. The Radisson Slavjanskaya, a 430-room enterprise connected to a 165-suite business center, is a challenge like none other for Radisson, a unit of the $6.2-billion (annual revenue) Carlson Companies of Minneapolis.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Appealing for help to pull the Soviet Union out of its deep economic crisis, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Tuesday promised American companies wide access to the Soviet market and a good return on their investment. "If you get a foothold in the Soviet market, the opportunities will be endless," Gorbachev said as he visited the first full-fledged U.S. trade show to be held in the Soviet Union. "Right now, we are rethinking everything, rearranging everything."
BUSINESS
February 3, 1989 | STEVE KATZ, Associated Press
Soviet television viewers could soon be exposed to regular doses of something all too familiar to Westerners: commercials. The prospect arose at a news conference Thursday to announce that the world's biggest advertising agency, Saatchi & Saatchi, has been hired to advise the Soviets on how to attract Western advertisers and their hard currency. The idea is to build up corporate images and familiarize Soviets with the types of products they can expect from President Mikhail S.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As Mikhail S. Gorbachev makes a pitch during his New York visit for more business with the United States, his government is returning to an old Russian standby and once again asking Ford Motor Co. to make cars in the Soviet Union. The immediate story is that the Soviet automotive ministry is talking to Ford about modernizing a 60-year-old car plant in the city of Gorky to manufacture Ford Scorpio models in the Soviet Union.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Charles W. Missler savors the panoramic view from his spacious offices on the seventh floor of a futuristic-looking Irvine office tower. From there, Missler can look past the busy San Diego Freeway to the headquarters of Western Digital Corp., the computer manufacturer he nursed back from bankruptcy in the late 1970s. The view serves both as a reminder of the struggling company he saved and of the sizable personal fortune he made.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crumbling, cash-starved Soviet Union wouldn't be on anyone's short list of potential new sources for investment capital, but that hasn't stopped Montgomery Securities from going ahead with the first effort to sell stock in American companies to Soviet citizens.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caught in a political shuffle in the Soviet Union, an Irvine development company's pioneering hotel and business complex in Moscow is in trouble again. Americom Business Centers Inc. said Monday that the Russian republic's Finance Ministry has terminated a joint venture that built and operated the first U.S.-managed hotel and business center in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration plans to encourage U.S. companies to invest millions of dollars of their money and some of their best technology in the Soviet defense industry--to help convert it to civilian production and private enterprise. Donald J. Atwood, deputy U.S.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1991
Benton Oil & Gas Co., an Oxnard energy concern, said it has formed a joint venture with two Russian partners to explore, produce and market oil and natural gas from fields in West Siberia. The joint venture, named Geoilbent, will be based in the town of Tarko-Sale, about 1,500 miles northeast of Moscow. Benton will own 34% of the venture. The two Russian partners, which are arms of the Russian ministries that regulate natural resources, will each own 33%.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ancient-looking oil rig stood idle as the roughnecks who should have been drilling a new well were busy foraging for mushrooms in the mossy west Siberian forest nearby. The oil workers at Pad No. 32 and the three other Soviet drilling crews at West Varyegan Field in the oil-rich Tyumen region of Siberia were all stalled that day because they had run out of cement. "All we can do is sit and wait," Igor Shokalyuk, 28, the foreman at West Varyegan Pad No.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The trouble with a lot of the expert analysis on the breakup of the Soviet Union is that it gives too much credit to bureaucracy and too little to the human spirit. "It is feared that the Soviet republics could become economic basket cases," say Washington foreign policy officials--as if 70 years of Moscow central planning hasn't made them basket cases already. One could imagine such experts in 1776 condemning the American colonies for breaking away from the British empire. But some savvy U.S.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Madison Avenue jumped on the glasnost bus in more ways then one Thursday. An American firm that sells advertising space on buses from Los Angeles to New York signed a multimillion-dollar licensing agreement to sell ads on every public bus in Moscow--and a dozen other Soviet cities. By July, Transportation Displays Inc.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Charles W. Missler, chairman of Phoenix Group International, said Tuesday that knowing the right people helped his Irvine-based, high-technology company nail down a deal to supply personal computers to the Soviet Union. But just in case knowing the right people was not enough, Missler said, his small company tried to impress its prospective Soviet customers by flying them to Silicon Valley meetings with corporate chieftains in a leased Lear jet and in a helicopter.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buried in a dusty 1920 Pentagon report is a laudatory evaluation of what may be the least-remembered U.S. foreign intervention. "This expedition affords one of the finest examples in history of honorable, unselfish dealings . . . under very difficult circumstances to be helpful to a people struggling to achieve a new liberty," the Army chief of staff reported. The "expedition," between 1918 and 1920, was the deployment to northern Russia and Siberia of 10,000 U.S.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that Mikhail S. Gorbachev is back as president of the Soviet Union, Baskin-Robbins International Co. is thinking of reintroducing "Gorbachocolate" as a summer flavor in its Moscow stores. But other than that, the Glendale-based ice cream company has no changes planned for its Soviet operations despite last week's failed coup attempt and the ensuing momentous political changes.
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