Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Investments West Germany
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Investments West Germany

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 3, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. said Thursday that it has agreed to be bought for $3.3 billion in cash by Allianz AG of Munich, West Germany, already Europe's largest insurer and a company long intent on expanding in the lucrative U.S. market. Fireman's Fund, based north of San Francisco in Novato, Calif., is the main subsidiary of Fund American Cos. of Greenwich, Conn. Last year, Fireman's Fund ranked 15th among U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 3, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. said Thursday that it has agreed to be bought for $3.3 billion in cash by Allianz AG of Munich, West Germany, already Europe's largest insurer and a company long intent on expanding in the lucrative U.S. market. Fireman's Fund, based north of San Francisco in Novato, Calif., is the main subsidiary of Fund American Cos. of Greenwich, Conn. Last year, Fireman's Fund ranked 15th among U.S.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
February 2, 1990
Fluor Daniel Inc. said it has received two contracts valued at more than $37 million to help build and operate a plant that will produce liquid carbon dioxide used in carbonated beverage and food processing. Intercontinental Energy Corp. of Hingam, Mass., has hired Fluor Daniel, the primary operating subsidiary of Irvine-based Fluor Corp. to provide engineering, construction, start-up and performance testing for a 350-ton-per-day liquid carbon dioxide production facility.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | From United Press International
Ford Motor Co. canceled plans Monday to invest $365 million in car engine plants in Wales and said it would instead opt to spend the money in West Germany because British workers and weather are unreliable. The announcement was greeted with disappointment by both union workers and management at the two plants in Bridgend and Swansea, where about 3,000 jobs were to have been created under the plan to eventually build more than half of Ford's European-made engines in Britain.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr.
Billing itself as the world's largest and oldest publishing company--established in 1835, it has annual sales of $6 billion and 40,000 employees worldwide--Bertelsmann AG has been on something of an American buying binge in recent years, acquiring Bantam Books, Doubleday & Co., Dell Publishing and Parents Magazine, among others. In 1984, the West German firm made an unsuccessful bid to acquire U.S. News & World Report for $150 million.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1990 | Associated Press
A subsidiary of Union Carbide Corp. will sell a specialty chemical business to Hoechst Celanese Corp., a West German firm, for an undisclosed price, officials said. Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Co. said it has reached an agreement to sell its primary alcohol ethoxylates, or PAEs, business. PAEs are agents used to make household products such as laundry detergents and cleaners.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Community Psychiatric Centers said Tuesday that it has tentatively agreed to buy Brea Neuropsychiatric Hospital and a West German mental health management company, and also disclosed that admissions at its hospitals dipped slightly in its first quarter. Terms of both proposed acquisitions were not disclosed. The news concerning the nearly 2% decline in hospital admissions prompted a 4.7% decline in the Laguna Hills-based company's stock amid unusually heavy trading, analysts said.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East Germans have not been the only ones flooding into West Germany since the Berlin Wall opened. Foreign investors have flocked there, too. A torrent of foreign money has flowed into West German stocks in recent months as the nation expects to profit handsomely from the political changes in Eastern Europe. But investing in West German stocks can be tricky for the average investor, and many may find that they have already missed out on any substantial short-term gains.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1990
Fluor Daniel Inc. said it has received two contracts valued at more than $37 million to help build and operate a plant that will produce liquid carbon dioxide used in carbonated beverage and food processing. Intercontinental Energy Corp. of Hingam, Mass., has hired Fluor Daniel, the primary operating subsidiary of Irvine-based Fluor Corp. to provide engineering, construction, start-up and performance testing for a 350-ton-per-day liquid carbon dioxide production facility.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1989 | From United Press International
Ecolab Inc. said it has sold $110 million in preferred stock to a German chemical and detergent company in the first step toward a possible merger of the companies' cleaning and sanitizing businesses overseas. The St. Paul company also said it is restructuring its ChemLawn subsidiary and taking a $28-million to $32-million charge in the fourth quarter to pay up-front costs associated with the restructuring.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Telesis won a stake in one of Europe's most lucrative telecommunications markets Thursday as West Germany awarded it and other members of a four-nation consortium a license to build the country's first private cellular telephone system. The development could mean hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for the San Francisco-based regional telephone company.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Telesis won a stake in one of Europe's most lucrative telecommunications markets Thursday as West Germany awarded it and other members of a four-nation consortium a license to build the country's first private cellular telephone system. The development could mean hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for the San Francisco-based regional telephone company.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
International Business Machines Corp. on Monday stepped up production here of a new four-megabit memory chip critical to the development of the computer giant's most sophisticated products. The Sindelfingen plant, about 15 miles west of Stuttgart, is only the second plant in the world that will mass produce the complex semiconductors for IBM. Production-line manufacturing began in Burlington, Vt.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|