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United States Foreign Policy

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August 5, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Whenever former President Ronald Reagan accused Congress of tinkering too much with national security policy, his antagonists on Capitol Hill always had a ready answer: They were forced to do it because the President never consulted them. But now that relations between the White House and Congress have entered a new era of cooperation and consultation under President Bush, it appears that Reagan's complaint may have been justified after all.
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January 5, 2003 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead is senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at the Council on Foreign Relations and the author of "Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World."
First Great Triumph How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power Warren Zimmermann Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 562 pp., $30 * Warren Zimmermann's "First Great Triumph," an account of the imperialist era in American foreign policy at the turn of the 20th century, is one of the most readable and important books on American foreign policy in recent years. Zimmermann, a distinguished U.S.
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NEWS
December 13, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The images are haunting still: the twisted wrecks of helicopter gunships shot down in the Oct. 3, 1993, firefight that killed 18 U.S. Army Rangers in Somalia; the charred body of an American soldier paraded through the streets of Mogadishu by a chanting crowd. Vivid even now, they are driving the national debate--leading to today's scheduled vote in the Senate--over President Clinton's plan to send 20,000 U.S. ground troops on a potentially hazardous peacekeeping mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What a difference a war makes. When George W. Bush was inaugurated last year, he was widely seen as a neophyte in world affairs. During the campaign, he'd been caught short on the names of foreign leaders. He came to office with limited foreign travel, much of it on vacations. And little of his father's long diplomatic experience--at the United Nations, the CIA, in China and during his own presidency--seemed to have rubbed off.
NEWS
September 13, 1986 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone, his term in office just extended by a year, promised Friday to trim Japan's huge foreign trade surplus by stimulating consumption at home. The surplus has been criticized by Japan's trading partners--including the United States--which buy much more from Japanese producers than they have been able to sell in the Japanese market.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton vetoed Republican-backed legislation Friday that reorganized the government's foreign policy bureaucracy and demanded a diplomatic assault on relations with China. Clinton accused the lawmakers of unconstitutional meddling with his authority over foreign affairs. "This legislation contains many unacceptable provisions that would undercut U.S.
NEWS
October 2, 1995 | JIM MANN
President Clinton had good reason last week to call attention to his foreign policy successes. For a change, everything seemed to be going right, and Clinton deserves his share of the credit. Unfortunately, in the midst of it all, the President tried to seize the opportunity to portray himself as some sort of visionary, a man with far-reaching ideas about the world and America's role in it. It didn't work.
BOOKS
January 5, 2003 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead is senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at the Council on Foreign Relations and the author of "Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World."
First Great Triumph How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power Warren Zimmermann Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 562 pp., $30 * Warren Zimmermann's "First Great Triumph," an account of the imperialist era in American foreign policy at the turn of the 20th century, is one of the most readable and important books on American foreign policy in recent years. Zimmermann, a distinguished U.S.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
In one of the most closely held U.S. intelligence and military programs of the last decade, the United States has covertly trained counterterrorism squads in dozens of countries in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and Latin America. The United States has turned to training foreign forces as proxies because of the legal, political and logistical difficulties in deploying its own counterterrorism units overseas.
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | JIM MANN
Is there any grand principle or philosophy underlying President Clinton's foreign policies? You have to wonder. One of the strangest episodes of the past few weeks was Clinton's effort to depict himself as a "realist" in the tradition of President Richard Nixon and Nixon's secretary of state, Henry A. Kissinger. It was certainly the right message for the audience.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of deliberation, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell has decided not to attend the U.N. conference on racism beginning in Durban, South Africa, later this week. Senior U.S. officials said Saturday that the Bush administration has not yet determined whether to send a lower-level delegation from Washington, send diplomats in the region or possibly boycott the conference altogether.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has gone on the offensive to counter claims that it is acting unilaterally around the world by rejecting groundbreaking treaties or defying the advice, appeals and positions of key allies. As if reading from a common script, the top three U.S. foreign policy officials have started talking tough over the last few days about how involved the administration is around the world.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After his debut before the world's most powerful military alliance Wednesday, President Bush said he made "good progress" in convincing U.S. allies in Europe about the need for a new approach to strategic defense based on his controversial proposal to create a missile shield. But a majority of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's 19 member states still appeared to be resisting the U.S. plan.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With frustration mounting in the two Koreas over the Bush administration's slow pace in crafting a North Korea policy and apparent reluctance to negotiate with the Stalinist regime, Seoul and Pyongyang sent a not-so-subtle message to Washington this week: If you're not willing to provide diplomatic leadership, we'll ask Europe to pick up some of the slack.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration admitted Friday that the United States had lost its seat on the U.N. Human Rights Commission this week after receiving "solid, written assurances" of support from 43 countries in advance--only to get just 29 votes during the secret ballot. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said he was astonished and disappointed at the outcome, ending more than half a century in which the United States was the moral anchor of a group co-founded by former U.N.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States was voted off the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Thursday, marking the first time since the world body's inception more than five decades ago that the Americans will not hold a seat. "It was an election, understandably, where we're very disappointed," said acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham. "This won't at all, of course, affect our commitment to human rights issues in and outside of the United Nations. We'll continue to pursue them." In a surprise result, the U.S.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | ART PINE and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton Administration is prepared to virtually blockade the 90-mile-wide strait between Florida and Cuba if Cuban President Fidel Castro launches a repeat of the 1980 Mariel boat lift, in which he sent thousands of Cubans to America's shores. Key Administration officials said the effort would involve dozens of Coast Guard vessels, from relatively small surfboats to cutters of 100 feet or more, aided by Coast Guard and Navy surveillance aircraft.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson Mandela's provocative statement of support for Moammar Kadafi, Fidel Castro and Yasser Arafat has surprised and disturbed the Bush Administration, complicating a presidential meeting that is the main event of Mandela's triumphant U.S. tour. Although Mandela's sentiments had long been known, his strong expression of them in a television interview called attention to tensions between blacks and Jews in the domestic political scene.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing to make religious liberty "a guiding doctrine of our foreign policy," President Bush said Thursday that China's persecution of believers will thwart that nation's aspirations of becoming a great power. Reciting a catalog of religious repression, Bush also said his administration will never condone the abuses that it says are occurring in Sudan, Iraq, Iran, Cuba, Afghanistan and the former Soviet republics in Central Asia.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than three months after President Bush cut off U.S. funding for international family planning groups that perform or promote abortions, a House committee voted Wednesday to reverse that policy, intensifying a political controversy the administration had hoped would subside. The 26-22 vote in the House International Relations Committee kept alive an issue that abortion foes considered settled after Bush issued an executive order rolling back a Clinton-era policy.
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