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United States Foreign Policy Afghanistan

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August 18, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan pledged Wednesday that U.S. military aid for Pakistan will continue undiminished despite the death in a plane crash of autocratic President Zia ul-Haq, but American foreign policy experts said a period of instability that could damage U.S. policy from Afghanistan to the Persian Gulf is almost a certainty.
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NEWS
February 12, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
With the last Soviet troops about to leave Afghanistan, the Bush Administration has decided to press for the replacement of the Soviet-backed Najibullah regime in Kabul as quickly as possible, U.S. officials said Saturday.
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NEWS
April 10, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union on Saturday gave the United States its much-anticipated response to the Reagan Administration's compromise proposal for the two countries to continue supporting opposing factions in Afghanistan after the withdrawal of Soviet troops from the war. The contents of the message from Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan pledged Wednesday that U.S. military aid for Pakistan will continue undiminished despite the death in a plane crash of autocratic President Zia ul-Haq, but American foreign policy experts said a period of instability that could damage U.S. policy from Afghanistan to the Persian Gulf is almost a certainty.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
With the last Soviet troops about to leave Afghanistan, the Bush Administration has decided to press for the replacement of the Soviet-backed Najibullah regime in Kabul as quickly as possible, U.S. officials said Saturday.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
When Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev offered in early February to remove all 115,000 Soviet troops from Afghanistan, the Reagan Administration was caught in an awkward, curious situation. In theory, the Administration should have been overjoyed: Gorbachev was proposing the first full-scale withdrawal of Soviet troops from another country in more than three decades. It amounted to a major reversal and strategic defeat for Moscow--one for which the Reagan Administration might claim some credit.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration has begun to confront a new series of foreign policy questions about the future of Afghanistan after Soviet troops complete their withdrawal. The central issue is to what extent the United States should become involved in shaping and supporting a new Afghan government if the current Soviet-backed Najibullah regime collapses in the way that U.S. officials expect. For the moment, at least, the Administration seems inclined to keep its hands off, arguing that any U.S.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration has begun to confront a new series of foreign policy questions about the future of Afghanistan after Soviet troops complete their withdrawal. The central issue is to what extent the United States should become involved in shaping and supporting a new Afghan government if the current Soviet-backed Najibullah regime collapses in the way that U.S. officials expect. For the moment, at least, the Administration seems inclined to keep its hands off, arguing that any U.S.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union on Saturday gave the United States its much-anticipated response to the Reagan Administration's compromise proposal for the two countries to continue supporting opposing factions in Afghanistan after the withdrawal of Soviet troops from the war. The contents of the message from Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
When Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev offered in early February to remove all 115,000 Soviet troops from Afghanistan, the Reagan Administration was caught in an awkward, curious situation. In theory, the Administration should have been overjoyed: Gorbachev was proposing the first full-scale withdrawal of Soviet troops from another country in more than three decades. It amounted to a major reversal and strategic defeat for Moscow--one for which the Reagan Administration might claim some credit.
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