Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Policy Africa
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Policy Africa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 26, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With civil wars in Africa threatening to spread to neighboring countries, and a Balkan conflict ready to erupt again, President Clinton's impeachment-clouded administration faces a growing list of war-or-peace decisions in the new year--even if it is able to keep Iraq in a strategic box.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was nothing less than a coming-out party for a significant force in shaping America's global priorities, more than 2,000 representatives from the country's newest lobbying group met here Thursday to approve an action plan for U.S. policy toward Africa.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was nothing less than a coming-out party for a significant force in shaping America's global priorities, more than 2,000 representatives from the country's newest lobbying group met here Thursday to approve an action plan for U.S. policy toward Africa.
NEWS
December 26, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With civil wars in Africa threatening to spread to neighboring countries, and a Balkan conflict ready to erupt again, President Clinton's impeachment-clouded administration faces a growing list of war-or-peace decisions in the new year--even if it is able to keep Iraq in a strategic box.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the oddest coalitions ever assembled in this town of strange alliances, the 38-member Congressional Black Caucus--Democrats all--joined 175 House Republicans recently to stall legislation intended to give President Clinton firmer control over the federal budget. For the Republicans, it was a partisan move; for the Black Caucus, it was a wake-up call. The caucus chairman, Rep. Kweisi Mfume (D-Md.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Friday escalated his attack on Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, saying the Democratic front-runner is further to the right than President Reagan and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in at least one aspect of foreign policy. Jackson charged that Dukakis opposes sending military aid to Mozambique's Marxist government--assistance that even Reagan favors.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed controversial trade legislation Wednesday designed to aid poor countries in sub-Saharan Africa, despite vigorous opposition from some American blacks and liberals who fear that it would threaten low-wage jobs in the United States. The measure, approved 233-186, would grant full access to U.S. markets--free of most import quotas or duties--to those sub-Saharan African countries that are deemed to be moving toward democracy and free-market economies.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
When George P. Shultz was asked during a congressional hearing what had given him the most satisfaction as secretary of state, he described a telephone call from Jewish activist Ida Nudel informing him that she had reached Jerusalem after years of fighting for permission to leave the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren Christopher's visit to Africa this week--the first by a U.S. secretary of state in the post-Cold War era--has become such a big deal that it prompted a banner headline, "Welcome Warren," across the top half of the front page of one newspaper here. An entire road--in a poor country larger than California and Texas combined, where 95% of the roads are just dirt tracks and there is not a single highway--was graded to ease his trip to a rural Peace Corps post.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past four decades, an era in which most African nations gained their independence, U.S. policy toward the continent has been driven by Washington's determination to check Soviet influence. This was true, even if it meant propping up corrupt, tyrannical dictators with little more to offer than anti-Communist rhetoric. Now, freed from the ideology of the Cold War, the Bush Administration has embarked on a program of encouraging genuine democracy in Africa. And U.S.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed controversial trade legislation Wednesday designed to aid poor countries in sub-Saharan Africa, despite vigorous opposition from some American blacks and liberals who fear that it would threaten low-wage jobs in the United States. The measure, approved 233-186, would grant full access to U.S. markets--free of most import quotas or duties--to those sub-Saharan African countries that are deemed to be moving toward democracy and free-market economies.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren Christopher's visit to Africa this week--the first by a U.S. secretary of state in the post-Cold War era--has become such a big deal that it prompted a banner headline, "Welcome Warren," across the top half of the front page of one newspaper here. An entire road--in a poor country larger than California and Texas combined, where 95% of the roads are just dirt tracks and there is not a single highway--was graded to ease his trip to a rural Peace Corps post.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the oddest coalitions ever assembled in this town of strange alliances, the 38-member Congressional Black Caucus--Democrats all--joined 175 House Republicans recently to stall legislation intended to give President Clinton firmer control over the federal budget. For the Republicans, it was a partisan move; for the Black Caucus, it was a wake-up call. The caucus chairman, Rep. Kweisi Mfume (D-Md.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past four decades, an era in which most African nations gained their independence, U.S. policy toward the continent has been driven by Washington's determination to check Soviet influence. This was true, even if it meant propping up corrupt, tyrannical dictators with little more to offer than anti-Communist rhetoric. Now, freed from the ideology of the Cold War, the Bush Administration has embarked on a program of encouraging genuine democracy in Africa. And U.S.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
When George P. Shultz was asked during a congressional hearing what had given him the most satisfaction as secretary of state, he described a telephone call from Jewish activist Ida Nudel informing him that she had reached Jerusalem after years of fighting for permission to leave the Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Friday escalated his attack on Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, saying the Democratic front-runner is further to the right than President Reagan and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in at least one aspect of foreign policy. Jackson charged that Dukakis opposes sending military aid to Mozambique's Marxist government--assistance that even Reagan favors.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|