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NEWS
February 13, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher embarks next week on his first Middle East tour, the Arabs find themselves in a dilemma: how to persuade the Americans to broker a better deal on the issue of the Palestinians deported from Israel without having to play their own trump card--staying away from the next round of peace talks with Israel.
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NEWS
September 16, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost half a century of tension with the Arab world over the Palestinian issue, the United States has a historic opportunity to redefine its relationship with the 22-nation bloc by helping the new Palestinian entity get established in Jericho and the Gaza Strip.
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NEWS
September 16, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost half a century of tension with the Arab world over the Palestinian issue, the United States has a historic opportunity to redefine its relationship with the 22-nation bloc by helping the new Palestinian entity get established in Jericho and the Gaza Strip.
NEWS
February 13, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher embarks next week on his first Middle East tour, the Arabs find themselves in a dilemma: how to persuade the Americans to broker a better deal on the issue of the Palestinians deported from Israel without having to play their own trump card--staying away from the next round of peace talks with Israel.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, looking beyond Tuesday's deadline for Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait, has quietly mobilized a special interagency task force to deal with the "end game" of the Persian Gulf crisis--the complex political problems that will exist whether the confrontation is resolved by diplomacy or war. "Getting Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait is going to look easy compared to what must be accomplished afterwards to stabilize the region," said an official close to the task force.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of investigating the Bank of Credit & Commerce International, one issue remains unresolved for U.S. investigators: Why was the bank so anxious to do business in the United States? The question arises primarily because BCCI executives showed such unflinching determination to expand their global banking network in the United States, even though their efforts to buy banks in this country were firmly opposed by the Federal Reserve Board. To circumvent U.S.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney's first postwar tour of the Persian Gulf, six Arab nations moved toward agreement Sunday on a regional security plan that may one day include former enemy Iran. Ending a daylong meeting, the foreign ministers of Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and four other Gulf states also demanded that international economic sanctions against Iraq be maintained until Baghdad releases all prisoners of war and pays billions of dollars in reparations.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release of the final three American hostages in Lebanon last week is the latest signal that the Middle East may finally be joining the "new world order." Although the quantity and quality of change in that most troubled and volatile region still lags far behind other parts of the world, U.S. officials and private analysts believe that most states are now engaged in processes--economic, political or social--that cannot easily be reversed.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release of the final three American hostages in Lebanon last week is the latest signal that the Middle East may finally be joining the "new world order." Although the quantity and quality of change in that most troubled and volatile region still lags far behind other parts of the world, U.S. officials and private analysts believe that most states are now engaged in processes--economic, political or social--that cannot easily be reversed.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of investigating the Bank of Credit & Commerce International, one issue remains unresolved for U.S. investigators: Why was the bank so anxious to do business in the United States? The question arises primarily because BCCI executives showed such unflinching determination to expand their global banking network in the United States, even though their efforts to buy banks in this country were firmly opposed by the Federal Reserve Board. To circumvent U.S.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney's first postwar tour of the Persian Gulf, six Arab nations moved toward agreement Sunday on a regional security plan that may one day include former enemy Iran. Ending a daylong meeting, the foreign ministers of Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and four other Gulf states also demanded that international economic sanctions against Iraq be maintained until Baghdad releases all prisoners of war and pays billions of dollars in reparations.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, looking beyond Tuesday's deadline for Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait, has quietly mobilized a special interagency task force to deal with the "end game" of the Persian Gulf crisis--the complex political problems that will exist whether the confrontation is resolved by diplomacy or war. "Getting Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait is going to look easy compared to what must be accomplished afterwards to stabilize the region," said an official close to the task force.
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