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United States Foreign Policy Asia

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NEWS
February 14, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing to withdraw 10% to 12% of its military forces from South Korea, Japan and the Philippines over the next three years, according to a classified Pacific strategy plan being prepared by the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will present the plan to South Korean defense officials today as he begins 10 days of high-level meetings with leaders of the East Asian allies.
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NEWS
March 9, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung's visit to Washington has brought forth the first significant change by the Bush administration in U.S. policy toward Asia. With a few brief remarks by President Bush on Wednesday and further explanations by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Thursday, the new administration threw cold water on the Clinton administration's efforts last fall to bring about a speedy rapprochement with the Communist regime in North Korea. "What the president was saying . . .
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NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have been unimaginable only a few years ago. But President Clinton appears to have moved American foreign policy into a close alignment with China, ending the estrangement that has prevailed since the end of the Cold War. With their second amicable summit meeting in eight months, with a package of deals and a stunningly warm, earthy news conference, Clinton and Chinese President Jiang Zemin have succeeded, at least for now, in forging a new partnership.
NEWS
December 22, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
One of the ironies of the presidential campaign is that some foreign governments view the cautious vice president, Al Gore, as an unsettling harbinger of change and his challengers as soothing perpetuators of the status quo. A few days ago, a senior Asian diplomat was giving a private rundown of what the four leading candidates might mean for Asia. It went like this: George W. Bush?
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking a hawkish stance on Asian security issues, Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole on Thursday endorsed U.S. deployment of ballistic missile defenses in East Asian countries, including Taiwan, despite China's vehement opposition to such systems. In the first foreign policy speech of his campaign against President Clinton, Dole also endorsed the renewal of China's most-favored-nation (MFN) trade privileges.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton and Secretary of State Warren Christopher took office, they announced they would redirect U.S. foreign policy to give top emphasis to Asia. But 18 months into Clinton's presidency, the Administration is shifting its attention elsewhere as its relationship with Asia becomes more a detriment than a help to Clinton's political fortunes. The Administration also is quietly reshaping U.S.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's arrival in Tokyo this week for the annual meeting of the world's seven leading economic powers inevitably will focus attention on the new Administration's policy toward Japan and, more generally, Asia as a whole. But amid Tokyo's current political upheavals, Clinton's trip is likely to demonstrate that the Administration is having trouble coming to grips with Japan, the world's second-leading economic power, and with the dynamic East Asian region surrounding it.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after Secretary of State James A. Baker III landed Sunday in this pristine city-state, he was greeted by an old-fashioned military show: a parade of Singaporean troops and missiles and a flyover of roaring Skyhawk fighter jets. They served as a reminder of past decades of American policy in Asia, when the United States viewed places like Singapore as "dominoes" and tried to help them arm and defend themselves against an expansionist, Soviet-backed Communist regime in Vietnam. Now, U.S.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Seoul, the South Korean Foreign Ministry had just finished announcing the planned visit of President Bush when word arrived that he wasn't coming. Korean diplomats hastily retracted the announcement. In Tokyo, on his first full day in office, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa had to confess to reporters that he didn't know the details of why Bush had suddenly decided to cancel a four-nation Asian tour, with an emphasis on Japan.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan must shed its historic reluctance to play a part in global political affairs and should become engaged in a broad range of international security matters, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said here Friday. In a speech ostensibly designed to articulate U.S. foreign policy goals in Asia, Cheney prodded Japan to assume a greater role in fostering democracy and economic growth in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, as well as in other challenges facing the industrialized world.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have been unimaginable only a few years ago. But President Clinton appears to have moved American foreign policy into a close alignment with China, ending the estrangement that has prevailed since the end of the Cold War. With their second amicable summit meeting in eight months, with a package of deals and a stunningly warm, earthy news conference, Clinton and Chinese President Jiang Zemin have succeeded, at least for now, in forging a new partnership.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | JIM MANN
China up, Japan down. That, in essence, is the Clinton administration's policy toward Asia these days. In the midst of Asia's financial crisis, President Clinton has been quietly forging an American strategy that gives greater weight to China, and less to Japan, than at any time since Alexander M. Haig Jr. stepped down as Ronald Reagan's secretary of State in 1982.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Westward Ho. Madeleine Albright, the incoming secretary of state, said last week that U.S. policy would begin to pay more attention to Asia. "We're Eurocentric,"she said at her Senate confirmation hearings. "We need to look more to Asia." The European tilt of U.S. foreign policy has long worked to the disadvantage of California, which stands ready to supply everything from environmental technology to communications systems to fast-growing Asia. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House provided new evidence Monday acknowledging that Indonesian financier Mochtar Riady, whose family and employees have been major contributors to the Democratic Party, sought to influence President Clinton's policy in Asia. In a three-page letter dated March 9, 1993, Riady urged Clinton to normalize relations with Vietnam and to pursue expanded trade ties with the developing nations of Asia, including China, despite human rights abuses.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton expressed support for embattled Democratic fund-raiser John Huang on Friday, saying that he had the kind of business experience and international contacts that "we would be looking for" in senior Commerce Department positions. The president also said at a White House press conference that, though he had a long-standing relationship with Indonesian business executive James Riady, he had "absolutely not" shaded administration policy toward Indonesia as a result of it.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | JIM MANN
Over the weekend, America took a little-noticed but far-reaching step in its policy toward Asia--one that is likely to arouse the ire of China, Myanmar (Burma) and other repressive governments. Radio Free Asia went on the air. The new broadcast station, created by Congress to serve as an Asian counterpart to Radio Free Europe, started modestly and quietly Sunday, with a half-hour news broadcast to China. Plans are for the program to be aired each day at 7 a.m.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the United States losing interest in Asia or taking it for granted? This was supposed to be the month that the Bush Administration finally turned its attention to the world's largest, most populous continent, a region where many felt that America was ignoring its long-term importance amid its preoccupations with the Soviet Union and the Middle East. Instead, President Bush's abrupt postponement of a long-planned trip to the area has reinforced the sense of slight among Asian leaders.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung's visit to Washington has brought forth the first significant change by the Bush administration in U.S. policy toward Asia. With a few brief remarks by President Bush on Wednesday and further explanations by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Thursday, the new administration threw cold water on the Clinton administration's efforts last fall to bring about a speedy rapprochement with the Communist regime in North Korea. "What the president was saying . . .
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking a hawkish stance on Asian security issues, Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole on Thursday endorsed U.S. deployment of ballistic missile defenses in East Asian countries, including Taiwan, despite China's vehement opposition to such systems. In the first foreign policy speech of his campaign against President Clinton, Dole also endorsed the renewal of China's most-favored-nation (MFN) trade privileges.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding up a three-day visit to Asia, President Clinton offered Japanese and American audiences a fresh justification for the large U.S. military presence in the Pacific in addresses to the Japanese parliament today and to thousands of whooping, flag-waving service men and women aboard the aircraft carrier Independence.
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