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United States Foreign Policy Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
April 11, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) said Wednesday that President Clinton misled congressional leaders about the true U.S. role in Bosnia while the administration was secretly acquiescing to Iranian arms shipments to the Bosnian Muslims. Gingrich said in an interview that he, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and other lawmakers had many meetings with Clinton about U.S.
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NEWS
December 19, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Signaling a far-reaching shift of U.S. policy, President Clinton on Thursday declined to set a date for withdrawal of American forces in Bosnia and conceded that it had been a mistake to pledge that the troops would be home by June. Rather than set a new exit date, Clinton said it would be more "honest" to list some of the conditions he seeks in Bosnia-Herzegovina before a permanent withdrawal occurs.
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NEWS
April 4, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Bosnian Serb forces pressing attacks on the Muslim and Croatian populations in at least two Bosnian cities, Defense Secretary William J. Perry on Sunday ruled out the use of U.S. troops to prevent the Serbs from capturing additional territory. While Christians in the capital of Sarajevo observed their first peaceful Easter Sunday in two years, Bosnian Serb forces bombarded the city of Gorazde in southeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina for the sixth day.
NEWS
August 31, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the West dealt a serious setback in its efforts to boost Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic, the Clinton administration's senior envoy to Bosnia confronted hard-liners here Saturday with threats of "the most serious consequences imaginable" if they fail to obey peace accords that ended the country's war 20 months ago.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expressing a new optimism that the crisis in Bosnia-Herzegovina is easing, President Bush said Saturday that there can be no military quick fix for the complex conflict. In his third press conference in as many days devoted to the situation in the former Yugoslav republics, Bush emphasized the constraints that limit Western intervention and seemed to gloss over the atrocity stories that have fueled a growing public demand for action to stop Serbian aggression.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has decided to signal that it is willing to commit U.S. military forces--potentially including ground troops--to peacekeeping duty in Bosnia-Herzegovina if a peace agreement can be reached among the warring factions there, a senior official said Tuesday. The conditional offer of U.S.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton consulted congressional leaders Wednesday on his policy toward Bosnia but continued to avoid a firm commitment to seek congressional approval before deciding to send American forces there. The 1973 War Powers Act requires the President to notify Congress in most cases before sending troops into areas of potential hostilities and requires that the troops be withdrawn within 60 days if Congress does not authorize their presence.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | ART PINE and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Capt. Scott F. O'Grady, the pilot of the U.S. F-16 downed over Bosnia last week, has been rescued by Marines, NATO officials said today. "The pilot of the F-16 has been successfully rescued," said Maj. Pakis Pheodorakidis at NATO headquarters in Naples, Italy. He was taken to a U.S. amphibious assault ship, Pheodorakidis said. Commander Adm. Leighton Smith said on Cable News Network today that O'Grady was found 20 miles southeast of Bihac. U.S.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Republicans expressed apprehension Thursday about hints that President Clinton may deploy some U.S. troops in the Balkans after the current peacekeeping mission there ends in early 1997, but they stopped short of threatening to block him from doing so. At a news conference, six key GOP leaders--including House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia--warned that any such move would violate Clinton's pledge to bring U.S.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior Clinton administration officials insisted Thursday that the current military mission in Bosnia will end in late December as planned, but shaky conditions in the region and the near-certainty of a "follow-on" force suggest that a substantial number of American soldiers will probably remain in the Balkans through much or all of next year. Testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton won support Friday for more decisive action by European allies to consolidate the shaky peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Meeting separately with French President Jacques Chirac and Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi at the start of an eight-nation summit here, Clinton received support for greater European help in financing a program to train and equip local police forces in Bosnia, U.S. and European officials said.
NEWS
December 16, 1996 | From Associated Press
Anthony Lake's confirmation as CIA director remains uncertain, two key Republican senators said Sunday, despite his attempts to make amends for failing to tell Congress about Iranian arms sales to Bosnian Muslims two years ago. Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.), likely to take over as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee next month, called the Bosnia policy that Lake masterminded as President Clinton's national security advisor "duplicitous" and said, "It crossed the line."
NEWS
November 16, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton agreed Friday to keep American troops in Bosnia-Herzegovina until mid-1998, extending by 18 months his deadline for wrapping up a peacekeeping operation that he called the only barrier to resumption of bitter ethnic warfare in Europe.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration came "perilously close" to engaging in an unauthorized covert action when it secretly gave a green light to Iranian arms shipments to Bosnia in 1994, a Senate committee said in a report Thursday.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Republican-controlled House panel Thursday asked the Justice Department to conduct a criminal investigation of Clinton administration diplomats that it said may have lied under oath about a secret U.S. policy to allow Iranian arms to be shipped to Bosnia.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior Clinton administration officials insisted Thursday that the current military mission in Bosnia will end in late December as planned, but shaky conditions in the region and the near-certainty of a "follow-on" force suggest that a substantial number of American soldiers will probably remain in the Balkans through much or all of next year. Testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration conceded Friday that it may be unable to compel the removal of two top Bosnian Serb leaders who have been indicted on war crimes charges, even though their arrest and trial at The Hague is a central tenet of the Bosnian peace accord. Although insisting that Washington still wants political leader Radovan Karadzic and military commander Gen.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of a meeting of Western defense ministers, France, Britain and other contributors to the U.N. peacekeeping force in Bosnia-Herzegovina on Friday were weighing President Clinton's strings-attached offer of logistic help and even ground troops. But they remained convinced that a heavily armed European "rapid reaction force," and not a U.S.-led effort to consolidate peacekeepers, is the best way to shore up the faltering U.N. operation.
NEWS
September 14, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration's once lofty hopes for today's elections in Bosnia-Herzegovina have shrunk to this: If the voting is relatively peaceful and if the collective presidency and parliament actually convene, the Pentagon can comply with President Clinton's wishes and pull American troops out of the tortured country by the end of this year.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Republicans expressed apprehension Thursday about hints that President Clinton may deploy some U.S. troops in the Balkans after the current peacekeeping mission there ends in early 1997, but they stopped short of threatening to block him from doing so. At a news conference, six key GOP leaders--including House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia--warned that any such move would violate Clinton's pledge to bring U.S.
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