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United States Foreign Policy Cambodia

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NEWS
July 12, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The collapse of the multibillion-dollar global effort to implant democracy in Cambodia--an effort once widely perceived as a success--has shaken Western policymakers and raised questions about the current approach to international peacekeeping, including the NATO undertaking in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the strongest indication yet that the United States plans to play hardball with Cambodia's current leadership, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright pledged Wednesday to use U.S. leverage to ensure that Second Prime Minister Hun Sen restores the country's previous coalition government and observes the rule of law.
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NEWS
July 4, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, en route to Tokyo for meetings with embattled Prime Minister Sosuke Uno, said Monday that he will reassure Japan that the sex and bribery scandals that have engulfed the government will not damage U.S.-Japan cooperation. Talking to reporters on the flight from Washington, Baker said the U.S.-Japan relationship "is strong . . . durable . . . and very, very important, not just to the Pacific but to the world as a whole."
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | JIM MANN
An old ritual was played out in Washington last week. The ousted leader of a foreign government came to town, making the rounds to plead for U.S. support and help in regaining the power he has just lost. This time, the leader is Prince Norodom Ranariddh of Cambodia, head of a government that was democratically elected in 1993. He was deposed earlier this month in a coup d'etat by Second Prime Minister Hun Sen. Ranariddh was following a well-trodden path.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proeung Chhieng, the artistic director of the Cambodian dance company that is hoping to dance here in September's Los Angeles Festival, has a simple--yet compelling--argument to make. "We would like to dance for peace," he says. "For the troupe to come here would be to contribute to the efforts of our people (toward) having peace in our country, because right now Cambodian people in all the world want peace, and we pray every day that we will have peace in our country and for all Cambodians."
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the strongest indication yet that the United States plans to play hardball with Cambodia's current leadership, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright pledged Wednesday to use U.S. leverage to ensure that Second Prime Minister Hun Sen restores the country's previous coalition government and observes the rule of law.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Cambodia's uneasy political coalition in shambles after two days of heavy fighting in the capital, Phnom Penh, U.S. officials on Monday delayed choosing sides in the crisis in hopes of salvaging portions of the international agreement that, until now, brought a brief peace to the beleaguered Asian nation.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | JIM MANN
An old ritual was played out in Washington last week. The ousted leader of a foreign government came to town, making the rounds to plead for U.S. support and help in regaining the power he has just lost. This time, the leader is Prince Norodom Ranariddh of Cambodia, head of a government that was democratically elected in 1993. He was deposed earlier this month in a coup d'etat by Second Prime Minister Hun Sen. Ranariddh was following a well-trodden path.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cambodian National Dance Company has "a 95% chance" that it will participate in September's Los Angeles Festival, according to a central figure in the delicate political negotiations who just returned from Cambodia. "It ultimately depends on Washington," said John McAuliff, who represented the L.A. Festival when he met with Cambodian officials.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The collapse of the multibillion-dollar global effort to implant democracy in Cambodia--an effort once widely perceived as a success--has shaken Western policymakers and raised questions about the current approach to international peacekeeping, including the NATO undertaking in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Cambodia's uneasy political coalition in shambles after two days of heavy fighting in the capital, Phnom Penh, U.S. officials on Monday delayed choosing sides in the crisis in hopes of salvaging portions of the international agreement that, until now, brought a brief peace to the beleaguered Asian nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proeung Chhieng, the artistic director of the Cambodian dance company that is hoping to dance here in September's Los Angeles Festival, has a simple--yet compelling--argument to make. "We would like to dance for peace," he says. "For the troupe to come here would be to contribute to the efforts of our people (toward) having peace in our country, because right now Cambodian people in all the world want peace, and we pray every day that we will have peace in our country and for all Cambodians."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cambodian National Dance Company has "a 95% chance" that it will participate in September's Los Angeles Festival, according to a central figure in the delicate political negotiations who just returned from Cambodia. "It ultimately depends on Washington," said John McAuliff, who represented the L.A. Festival when he met with Cambodian officials.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, en route to Tokyo for meetings with embattled Prime Minister Sosuke Uno, said Monday that he will reassure Japan that the sex and bribery scandals that have engulfed the government will not damage U.S.-Japan cooperation. Talking to reporters on the flight from Washington, Baker said the U.S.-Japan relationship "is strong . . . durable . . . and very, very important, not just to the Pacific but to the world as a whole."
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