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United States Foreign Policy Central America

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NEWS
March 23, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Both the Sandinista army and the Contras gained strategic benefits from bloody battles at the Honduran border last week. As a result, each side is negotiating from an improved position in this week's peace talks, and neither side appears to be under increased military pressure to make concessions that might ease the way toward agreement. Sandinista troops struck a significant blow by driving hundreds of guerrillas out of jungle strongholds and across the Honduran border.
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NEWS
July 9, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1990s, the U.S. presence in Central America faded like the paint that demonstrators had sprayed on walls during the previous decade: "Yankee Go Home." The Cold War ended; the leftist guerrillas that Americans had helped fight signed peace agreements and turned themselves into political parties. The isthmus was no longer of much military interest. Now the Yankees are back. In what critics call a militarization of the drug war, U.S.
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NEWS
January 26, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, who urged Congress in his State of the Union speech to approve renewed aid to the Nicaraguan Contras, intends to dramatize that appeal by sending Secretary of State George P. Shultz on a peace mission to Central America, Administration officials said Monday. They said that the proposed trip marks a last-ditch effort to defuse growing congressional opposition to more Contra aid by demonstrating White House willingness to support the region's stalled peace process.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major address before El Salvador's Legislative Assembly, U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Monday called for stronger ties between the United States and Central America to expand trade and strengthen still-struggling democracies in the region. He also pledged greater U.S. support on crime and counter-narcotics programs, immigration issues and environmental problems to consolidate recent political and economic gains.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In a growing protest over the maiming of an anti-war protester, the wife of Nicaragua's president, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and a crowd of thousands converged Saturday on the dusty spot where Brian Willson's legs were severed when he knelt in front of a military munitions train.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
One man told of being forced into a pool of electrified water. A teacher testified that he was dragged out of the classroom over his students' wails of protest and interrogated for 15 days about a kidnaping he knew nothing about. Raul Sosa Rodriguez was 14 years old when government agents lined him up with a dozen other prisoners along the edge of a cliff and began killing them one by one with machetes, hurtling their bodies onto the rocks below.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waving signs with slogans such as "Decaf the death squads," about 100 activists rallied at Long Beach Harbor on Sunday to stop union dockworkers from unloading 34 tons of Salvadoran coffee beans from a Colombian freighter. It was the fourth time this month that the vessel, the Ciudad de Buenaventura, has docked at a West Coast port but been unable to shed its controversial cargo because of protests.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez complained Thursday that continued U.S. aid to Nicaragua's contras is an obstacle to his peace plan for Central America, but he said he does not believe that the Reagan Administration is actively trying to sabotage his proposal. Nicaragua "can't become a pluralistic country if there is war," Arias told a press conference after two days of talks with President Reagan and other U.S. officials.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major address before El Salvador's Legislative Assembly, U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Monday called for stronger ties between the United States and Central America to expand trade and strengthen still-struggling democracies in the region. He also pledged greater U.S. support on crime and counter-narcotics programs, immigration issues and environmental problems to consolidate recent political and economic gains.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Wednesday began a three-day trip to Central America aimed at reviving the Reagan Administration's moribund diplomacy in the area and persuading U.S. allies in the region to put more pressure on Nicaragua. Shultz arrived in Guatemala City on Wednesday evening and accused Nicaragua's leftist regime of breaking promises to move toward democracy and of "having no compassion for the people of Nicaragua."
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A State Department panel concluded Thursday that U.S. diplomats reported honestly and fully on human rights abuses in El Salvador during the 1980s but that higher officials in Washington sometimes distorted their reports for political reasons. The largely laudatory report abruptly reopened the 13-year-old debate over U.S. policy in Central America, and it prompted human rights activists and liberal Democrats in Congress to charge the State Department with whitewashing its own performance.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Brent Wehrli lives down a flowery lane in a lovely Spanish home in the hills of Brentwood. Her husband is a Century City lawyer, her daughter a first-year medical student at USC, her son a carpenter working on a teaching degree in Oakland. But there ends the stereotype of the pampered Westside housewife. The 47-year-old alumna of the Marlborough School and UCLA has a string of "gosh, I don't know, maybe 20" arrests, two as recent as January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waving signs with slogans such as "Decaf the death squads," about 100 activists rallied at Long Beach Harbor on Sunday to stop union dockworkers from unloading 34 tons of Salvadoran coffee beans from a Colombian freighter. It was the fourth time this month that the vessel, the Ciudad de Buenaventura, has docked at a West Coast port but been unable to shed its controversial cargo because of protests.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Protesters infiltrated a Republican fund-raiser in Los Angeles and shouted down President Bush in mid-speech Tuesday night before being removed by security guards. "You are killing children in El Salvador," one woman screamed at Bush, who appeared startled and broke off his address before a $1,000-a-plate dinner at the Century Plaza Hotel in Century City. "You profess to be a man of God! You profess to be an Episcopalian!" shouted another.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writers
For almost two centuries, the United States and Mexico have lived as uneasy neighbors, trapped in a tangled relationship marked by bickering, misunderstanding and sometimes war. But suddenly, a new, more conciliatory tone has overcome the habitual frictions between the two countries--and it was on ample display Monday in a top-level meeting that produced an outpouring of enthusiasm on both sides. "We are committed to a new relationship," U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III said.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Under fire from skeptical senators, a high-level FBI official Tuesday defended the agency's two-year surveillance of critics of U.S. Central American policy as a necessary but ultimately misguided attempt to deter terrorism. Oliver B. Revell, the bureau's executive assistant director of investigation, conceded, however, that a primary informant in the agency's anti-terrorism inquiry furnished many tips that eventually proved "blatantly false . . .
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
The Senate, serving notice that the fight over aiding the Nicaraguan Contras is far from over, defied House Democratic leaders Thursday and cast a symbolic vote endorsing the Reagan Administration's plan to give weapons and humanitarian aid to the anti-Sandinista rebels.
NEWS
May 19, 1989
A Kremlin spokesman said the United States knows that the Soviet Union has stopped providing weapons to Nicaragua and described U.S. intelligence reports to the contrary as "propaganda stunts." Spokesman Vadim Perfilyev told a news conference that "some circles constantly raise the issue of arms supplies . . . despite the fact that the Soviet Union, showing restraint, has not supplied weapons to Nicaragua for some time. . . ." He was commenting on doubts voiced by U.S. officials that Moscow has stopped arming Nicaragua in response to a U.S. policy shift from arms to diplomacy in Central America.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ART PINE, Times Staff Writers
President Bush and Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez agreed Saturday to begin intensive work on a plan to reduce Venezuela's $33-billion foreign debt, making the country one of the first "test cases" of America's new Third World debt strategy. U.S.
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