Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Policy China
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Policy China

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking change seemed to come from nowhere. Three months ago, Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui ushered in an era of heightened confrontation in East Asia by redefining Taiwan's relationship to China as that of one state to another. His statement--which he refused to retract and was scheduled to repeat in a National Day address early today--raised the possibility of military action by China, which claims Taiwan as part of its own territory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday said that extending normal trade relations with China for another year would signal U.S. desire to help the Chinese join the international trading system, boost economic development and gain greater freedom. The president sent the China trade measure to Congress on Friday, moving to keep relations with Beijing on an even keel. He had announced his decision to extend the trade provision in a speech Tuesday in Los Angeles. Rep.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suddenly, it's China's turn to feel needed. Thanks to India's surprise nuclear tests last week, the geopolitical axis has twisted overnight, putting China in a diplomatic position similar to the critical one it enjoyed and exploited during the Cold War.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sudden crisis over an American spy plane is forcing the Bush administration to make decisions about its policies toward China and the rest of Asia far earlier than it had planned. "I have to believe the administration really wishes this [crisis] hadn't come upon them that soon," said Jonathan Pollack, head of strategic research at the Naval War College in Rhode Island.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its current, determined effort to persuade Congress to extend U.S. trade benefits for China, the Bush Administration has argued repeatedly that the United States maintains most of the sanctions that it imposed upon the Chinese regime two years ago. "We continue today to impose most of the sanctions we began in the wake of the Tian An Men massacre," Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger recently told Congress.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is weighing a possible end to most remaining sanctions that the United States imposed on China for crushing the 1989 democracy protests in Tian An Men Square, despite President Clinton's assurances three months ago that he was extending the restrictions. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown confirmed Tuesday that the Administration is thinking about lifting the prohibitions on U.S. trade assistance to China and on the Overseas Private Investment Corp.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | JIM MANN
Let's examine one of the main hidden justifications underlying U.S. policy toward China and its Communist regime. We'll call it the Avoid-China's-Collapse strategy. What American officials say to explain their foreign policy in private often does not match what they say on television. Some arguments go over with the American public better than others.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1999 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than three weeks after a congressional committee charged that China's purchase of U.S. computers had damaged American national security, the committee chairman Thursday endorsed easing, not tightening, the most stringent U.S. limit on technology purchases, those by the Chinese military. Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach) described his decision as a bow to the reality that China can already buy powerful computers through Hong Kong.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright paraphrased Charles Dickens on Tuesday in assessing the perilous state of affairs between Washington and Beijing. "All told, it's fair to say that in our relations with China, these are neither the best of times nor the worst of times," Albright told reporters at the close of two days of turbulent meetings with China's ruling elite.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As he prepared to launch a wave of campaign ads touting himself as the true conservative candidate for president, Steve Forbes blasted the Clinton administration on Friday for what he saw as its lenient "amateur hour" treatment of China and called for a renewed hard line on an "unstable country" that threatens the world order with a "major military buildup."
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | JIM MANN
This is the story of a non-story. Sometimes, what isn't happening in our country is more interesting and significant than the dramas we see before us. And that's the case with the awkward silence that has descended, both in the presidential campaign and in Congress, over American policy toward China. The country ought to be having a debate, but instead our political leaders act as though they have all been afflicted by an epidemic of lockjaw.
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House of Representatives ushered in a new era of U.S.-China relations Wednesday, voting to bestow permanent normal trade relations on the communist regime in Beijing as the world's most populous nation prepares to open its markets and join the global trading community.
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, it was about far more than business with Beijing: The fierce struggle over U.S. economic ties to China has transformed a larger national debate on the global economy and its human fallout for years to come.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Has America lost all sense of outrage over China's human rights abuses? That question must be asked as China completes what is, by any reckoning, its worst year in human rights since the beginning of the 1990s. Let's briefly sum up what has happened in China over the last 12 months. The Communist Party regime has carried out its nationwide crackdown on the Falun Gong spiritual movement, detaining an estimated 35,000 people and sentencing four to as much as 18 years in prison.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As he prepared to launch a wave of campaign ads touting himself as the true conservative candidate for president, Steve Forbes blasted the Clinton administration on Friday for what he saw as its lenient "amateur hour" treatment of China and called for a renewed hard line on an "unstable country" that threatens the world order with a "major military buildup."
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking change seemed to come from nowhere. Three months ago, Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui ushered in an era of heightened confrontation in East Asia by redefining Taiwan's relationship to China as that of one state to another. His statement--which he refused to retract and was scheduled to repeat in a National Day address early today--raised the possibility of military action by China, which claims Taiwan as part of its own territory.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Led by Texas Gov. George W. Bush, Republican presidential hopefuls Tuesday were quick to denounce President Clinton's China policy--effectively bringing the political blame game full circle. Reacting from Austin after release of a congressional report on the issue, Bush accused the administration of essentially ignoring evidence of Chinese espionage, thus hastening China's emergence as a major nuclear power and a potential threat to U.S. interests.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday said that extending normal trade relations with China for another year would signal U.S. desire to help the Chinese join the international trading system, boost economic development and gain greater freedom. The president sent the China trade measure to Congress on Friday, moving to keep relations with Beijing on an even keel. He had announced his decision to extend the trade provision in a speech Tuesday in Los Angeles. Rep.
NEWS
September 22, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
There already are signs that China will be the main foreign-policy issue of the 2000 presidential campaign. And already commentators are painting inaccurate pictures of the role China has played in past American elections. Increasingly, the foreign-policy establishment and the American business community are perpetuating a myth about China in U.S. politics. It's worth probing, because we can't understand the present without knowing the past.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move likely to disappoint the Taiwanese government and please Beijing, President Clinton on Wednesday said he ordered the Pentagon to postpone a long-scheduled visit to Taiwan by a team of ballistic-missile experts and other officials who planned to assess the island's air-defense needs.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|