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NEWS
February 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yelstin, putting the Cold War formally to rest, proclaimed on Saturday a "new era" in which the two nations will join as allies to seek "an enduring peace that rests on lasting common values." In a joint declaration issued after a three-hour meeting at this rustic presidential retreat, they vowed that their countries will no longer regard each other as adversaries. Instead, they pledged to act as partners in promoting democracy and reform.
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NEWS
October 28, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger said Tuesday that he hopes to reassure officials of the former Soviet republics, as well as nations donating aid to the region, that the upcoming U.S. elections will not change Washington's commitments in the area. "I'm not predicting the election. . . .
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NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the Western democracies have yet to win the Cold War, former President Richard M. Nixon said Wednesday that the United States must lead the world in providing massive aid, perhaps $20 billion a year, to the former Soviet republics or risk confrontation with a new generation of despots.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the Western democracies have yet to win the Cold War, former President Richard M. Nixon said Wednesday that the United States must lead the world in providing massive aid, perhaps $20 billion a year, to the former Soviet republics or risk confrontation with a new generation of despots.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bush Administration officials said Thursday it is increasingly clear that the 2-month-old Commonwealth of Independent States is failing to function, completing the transformation of the old Soviet Union into 15 independent nations with little in common beyond a consensus on control of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger said Tuesday that he hopes to reassure officials of the former Soviet republics, as well as nations donating aid to the region, that the upcoming U.S. elections will not change Washington's commitments in the area. "I'm not predicting the election. . . .
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the Western democracies have yet to win the Cold War, former President Richard M. Nixon said Wednesday that the United States must lead the world in providing massive aid, perhaps $20 billion a year, to the former Soviet republics or risk confrontation with a new generation of despots.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | From Reuters
Former President Richard Nixon has criticized President Bush and Secretary of State James A. Baker III for their policy toward Russia's democratic revolution, saying one of the century's historic opportunities is being missed, according to published reports. "The stakes are high, and we are playing as if it were a penny-ante game," Nixon said in a memorandum circulated among friends and foreign affairs experts, the New York Times reported in today's edition.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is launching a new initiative in Central Asia, one of the last frontiers for U.S. foreign policy and one of the most problematic. Four of the region's five republics are the last bastions of unrepentant Communist rule in the new Commonwealth of Independent States. They are also the most impoverished and in need of outside help.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the Western democracies have yet to win the Cold War, former President Richard M. Nixon said Wednesday that the United States must lead the world in providing massive aid, perhaps $20 billion a year, to the former Soviet republics or risk confrontation with a new generation of despots.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | From Reuters
Former President Richard Nixon has criticized President Bush and Secretary of State James A. Baker III for their policy toward Russia's democratic revolution, saying one of the century's historic opportunities is being missed, according to published reports. "The stakes are high, and we are playing as if it were a penny-ante game," Nixon said in a memorandum circulated among friends and foreign affairs experts, the New York Times reported in today's edition.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bush Administration officials said Thursday it is increasingly clear that the 2-month-old Commonwealth of Independent States is failing to function, completing the transformation of the old Soviet Union into 15 independent nations with little in common beyond a consensus on control of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is launching a new initiative in Central Asia, one of the last frontiers for U.S. foreign policy and one of the most problematic. Four of the region's five republics are the last bastions of unrepentant Communist rule in the new Commonwealth of Independent States. They are also the most impoverished and in need of outside help.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yelstin, putting the Cold War formally to rest, proclaimed on Saturday a "new era" in which the two nations will join as allies to seek "an enduring peace that rests on lasting common values." In a joint declaration issued after a three-hour meeting at this rustic presidential retreat, they vowed that their countries will no longer regard each other as adversaries. Instead, they pledged to act as partners in promoting democracy and reform.
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