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United States Foreign Policy Cuba

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Santa Ana's Cueto family, the exodus of balseros --rafters--fleeing their native Cuba on flimsy craft has worked its way deep into the fabric of daily living. * It is the topic of discussion at every family meal, a point of heated political debate between the elder Cuetos and their grown children, and a pressing reminder of the pain of exile and the deteriorating conditions in the country they still love.
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NEWS
July 14, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush ordered toughened enforcement of long-standing sanctions against Cuba on Friday and said he would also expand support for human rights activists on the Communist-run island. "The sanctions the United States enforces against the Castro regime are not just a policy tool but a moral statement," Bush said. "It is wrong to prop up a regime that routinely stifles all the freedoms that make us human."
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NEWS
March 29, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The churches and streets here were filled soon after dawn Sunday with worshipers marking the start of the Christian Holy Week--once a forbidden scene in Communist-run Havana. But on Palm Sunday afternoon, all eyes were focused on baseball: About 50,000 party loyalists and friends, led by President Fidel Castro himself, packed the downtown Latin American Stadium for an exhibition game pitting the Cuban national team against the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The House voted Thursday to lift limits on U.S. food and drug sales to Cuba and to allow Americans to freely travel there. The vote was a major victory for farm, business and other groups trying to ease the four-decade-old sanctions against Fidel Castro's government. With supporters arguing that increased contacts would help weaken Castro's hold over the communist nation, the House voted 232 to 186 to stop enforcing rules that limit the ability of Americans to travel to Cuba.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 25,000 people, many urging the Clinton Administration with signs and chants to mount a total blockade of Cuba, marched Saturday in a funeral procession honoring a Cuban rafter who died at sea. A hearse carrying the body of Rafael Gamez, 34, led the two-mile procession down the main street of Little Havana to the cemetery, where several Cuban American elected officials spoke to the crowd. Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first enforcement of a law that has angered U.S. allies, the State Department said Wednesday that it will deny visas to senior executives, top shareholders and their families from a Canadian mining company accused of "trafficking" in confiscated U.S. property in Cuba. Sherritt International--co-owner with the Cuban government of a nickel mine on the eastern end of the island, among other investments--is the first company targeted under the Helms-Burton law.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Tuesday that it expects time and mortality to accomplish what 40 years of U.S. policy have failed to do: end Fidel Castro's iron grip on Cuba. Explaining a series of steps intended to ease the plight of Cuban citizens while maintaining pressure on Castro's government, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said the objective is to "help the Cuban people prepare for the day when their country is once again free."
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed a most unlikely meeting at the poolside breakfast tables of Havana's Hotel Nacional. In the heart of the Cuban capital, which U.S. foreign policy has sought to isolate for nearly four decades, Rep. Barbara Lee of Oakland, Calif., bumped into Sen. Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut, a ranking member of the Foreign Relations Committee and veteran of Cold War brush fires in Latin America.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Reuters
Cuban President Fidel Castro gave a cautious welcome Friday to a move by President Clinton to ease U.S. policy toward the island. "They [the measures] seem positive to us," Castro told the CNN television network in Havana. But the Cuban president added that he would need to see the full details of the U.S. announcement before making a fuller analysis.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. officials weighed the fate of a Cuban military officer who hijacked a commercial airliner at gunpoint and forced it to fly to the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay. While U.S. authorities said no decision on prosecuting the hijacker, identified as Lt. Col. Jose Fernandez Pupo, would be made for several days, legal experts said it appeared unlikely his request for political asylum would be granted.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was about 10:40 last Thanksgiving morning when Edward Agundez's phone rang at the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service in Fort Lauderdale. The call seemed routine: "Minor was rescued by two fishermen three miles out to sea from the Port Everglades port of entry," supervisory immigration inspector Agundez noted in a 12-line handwritten report later that day. He hung up and headed over to the hospital where the young rafter had been taken, suffering from dehydration and hypothermia.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While mounting a show of strength in support of Elian Gonzalez, the Cuban American community may ironically be losing the larger battle over the future of U.S. policy toward Cuba, according to foreign policy specialists. The Cuban Americans' spirited resistance to turning over the 6-year-old boy has attracted little support elsewhere in the United States.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department asked a federal judge Thursday to clear the way for Elian Gonzalez's return to Cuba, offering the court a vivid portrait of the 6-year-old boy's life there and of his close relationship with his father. In a debate that has been charged with political and legal overtones, federal attorneys offered new personal details about Elian as part of more than 400 pages of documentation filed in federal court in Miami.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Council of Churches, which has plunged into the middle of the Elian Gonzalez case, is a controversial organization that often has espoused liberal causes. Critics accuse it of having been too cozy with Marxist governments abroad.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elian Gonzalez was reunited with his two Cuban grandmothers here Wednesday in a private hourlong meeting that seemed only to underscore the bitter and highly political battle being waged over the fate of the 6-year-old boy. "It is very definitely a family affair that has somehow turned into political agendas that it is difficult for us to understand," said Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin, the Dominican nun and Barry University president who hosted the reunion at her home.
NEWS
January 26, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside Havana's premier exhibition hall, there was a distinct chill in the air Tuesday morning as a group of U.S. free-trade pioneers led by Rep. Maxine Waters of Los Angeles snipped a red-white-and-blue ribbon and quietly made history. Braving a midwinter cold snap, construction workers were busy erecting a permanent protest site outside the United States' seafront diplomatic mission here in the Cuban capital.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | ART PINE and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton Administration, concerned over the continued influx of Cuban refugees crossing the Florida Strait in crudely built boats and rafts, is preparing to try to stem the flow by making it easier for Cubans to obtain formal immigration visas at home. After a daylong meeting of an interagency task force, senior Administration officials decided to bolster the capability of the U.S.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of Cuban immigrants sailing toward Florida remained low Monday, despite the return of calm seas in the region, raising hopes by the Clinton Administration that Cubans finally are beginning to get the message that the journey would be fruitless. Coast Guard officials said that as of 6 p.m. EDT, their cutters had rescued 118 refugees from the Florida Straits--not much above the 84 picked up Sunday.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
Cuban American leaders, encouraged by a lawmaker's bid to keep 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez in the United States while a judge considers his case, said Saturday that they would temporarily halt protests against plans to return the child to Cuba. "We have called for a cautious, temporary hold of the civil disobedience campaign," said Ramon Saul Sanchez, head of Democracy Movement.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Lawyers for the relatives of 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez filed a petition Friday to appoint a guardian for the child, a first step toward trying to prevent the Cuban boy's return to his homeland. Neither the attorneys nor the family would comment on the petition until Judge Rosa Rodriguez made a decision in the case, said family spokesman Armando Gutierrez. In Cuba, meanwhile, tens of thousands of people in Elian's hometown rallied in a seaside plaza Friday night to demand his return.
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