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United States Foreign Policy East Germany

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NEWS
November 10, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Thursday hailed the opening of East Germany's borders as a "liberation," but he urged East Germans to resist the pull of the West and remain at home to reform their country. The announcement from East Berlin caught Bush Administration officials by surprise, sending shock waves through the White House and the government's foreign policy Establishment and leading some U.S. officials to worry that the changes that have rocked East Germany are coming too fast.
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NEWS
March 1, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, for months the international community's leading advocate of German reunification, suddenly has found itself on the defensive as influential senators and the politically potent Jewish and Polish communities warn of the potential for renewed German militarism. In an appearance before the Senate Budget Committee Wednesday, Secretary of State James A.
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NEWS
February 7, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After consultations with his French and British counterparts, Secretary of State James A. Baker III carries to Moscow today the outlines of a common allied position on German reunification, which has emerged as the most pressing single problem following the upheavals in Eastern Europe, senior U.S. officials indicated Tuesday.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After consultations with his French and British counterparts, Secretary of State James A. Baker III carries to Moscow today the outlines of a common allied position on German reunification, which has emerged as the most pressing single problem following the upheavals in Eastern Europe, senior U.S. officials indicated Tuesday.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, for months the international community's leading advocate of German reunification, suddenly has found itself on the defensive as influential senators and the politically potent Jewish and Polish communities warn of the potential for renewed German militarism. In an appearance before the Senate Budget Committee Wednesday, Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The East German government threw open its borders Thursday and announced that its citizens now may travel freely to West Germany. Thousands of jubilant East Germans quickly tested the new policy by flocking to the crossing points in divided Berlin. At Checkpoint Charlie, a major crossing point, a huge crowd gathered. As East Berliners in small groups made their way through the last barrier to West Berlin, the crowds on that side welcomed them with cheers and songs.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The East German government threw open its borders Thursday and announced that its citizens now may travel freely to West Germany. Thousands of jubilant East Germans quickly tested the new policy by flocking to the crossing points in divided Berlin. At Checkpoint Charlie, a major crossing point, a huge crowd gathered. As East Berliners in small groups made their way through the last barrier to West Berlin, the crowds on that side welcomed them with cheers and songs.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Thursday hailed the opening of East Germany's borders as a "liberation," but he urged East Germans to resist the pull of the West and remain at home to reform their country. The announcement from East Berlin caught Bush Administration officials by surprise, sending shock waves through the White House and the government's foreign policy Establishment and leading some U.S. officials to worry that the changes that have rocked East Germany are coming too fast.
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