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NEWS
March 13, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former secretary of state and the current director of the Central Intelligence Agency sounded separate warnings about global instability Thursday on the final day of a foreign policy conference sponsored by Yorba Linda's Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace. Henry A.
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NEWS
March 13, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former secretary of state and the current director of the Central Intelligence Agency sounded separate warnings about global instability Thursday on the final day of a foreign policy conference sponsored by Yorba Linda's Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace. Henry A.
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NEWS
February 12, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III made the last stop Sunday of his swing through three capitals of Eastern Europe, where he encouraged democratization, raised hopes and heard the frustrations of opposition leaders preparing for the first free elections in 40 years. Moscow appears to approve the program for change in the region that Baker supported in Prague, Czechoslovakia, his first stop, on Tuesday.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not since 1945, foreign policy scholars say, has the world seemed so full of promise and possibilities. The sudden collapse of the Soviet Union as a superpower is rapidly altering the basic premises of American foreign policy--and confronting President Bush with the prospect of a vacuum where a national strategy ought to be. For more than four decades, U.S.
NEWS
February 7, 1990
Recent accounts about Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega freeing U.S. funds for poll monitors for the upcoming elections on Feb. 25 was indeed good news. By allowing the Bush Administration, handpicked U.S. members of Congress and the anti-Sandinista coalition (UNO) to monitor all polling places, Ortega has assured that the elections will be certifiable by the entire world and in the best interest of all Nicaraguan people.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government analysts and Bush Administration policy makers are increasingly worried that the huge social and economic problems of the freshly liberated East Bloc nations could push some of them away from freedom and into the grip of new authoritarian regimes. Senior Administration officials still ardently support the East Bloc reformers, but they say the process of democratization is so fragile it could fall victim to political fragmentation, aggravated by serious economic strains.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, bowing to pressure from America's major allies, has agreed to back a gradual easing of restrictions on the sale of Western goods and technology to Eastern Europe in response to the rapid political changes there, officials said Monday. The decision, made at a meeting of the National Security Council, initially will affect only the sale of some advanced computers, machine tools and telecommunications equipment to Poland and Hungary.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
For those with any memory of the bad old days in Eastern Europe, President Bush's journey through Poland and Hungary this week was nothing short of astonishing--from the Warsaw lunch at which Communists and once-jailed opposition leaders joined in toasting the United States, to the Hungarian military band that saluted Bush with a spirited rendition of "The Stars and Stripes Forever." "(The) change is absolutely amazing," Bush marveled aboard Air Force One as he left Eastern Europe on Thursday.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gap has developed between the United States and its European allies about the importance of fast-moving changes in East Europe and how to react to them. Europeans argue that on such vital issues as growing instability in the Soviet Empire, the flowering of democracy in Poland and Hungary, and pressure for closeness between the two Germanys, the U.S. response has been characterized by sometimes contradictory voices.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You could say that we've won," a senior U.S. official remarked. "Our policy of 'differentiation' in Eastern Europe--of treating each nation differently depending on how they behaved--has succeeded. Or at least, it's been (overtaken by events). In either case, now we need a new construct, a new concept that embraces the region as a whole." Indeed, the remarkable changes that brought down the six regimes of the East Bloc in 1989 have also created a compelling need for a new U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | From Reuters
President Bush will meet with Lithuanian Prime Minister Kazimiera Prunskiene on Thursday to get a firsthand report on conditions in the rebel Baltic republic, but the White House said Tuesday that the talks do not mean a change in U.S. policy. "The President feels that it's important to get an authoritative readout and description of events in Lithuania. . . .
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III made the last stop Sunday of his swing through three capitals of Eastern Europe, where he encouraged democratization, raised hopes and heard the frustrations of opposition leaders preparing for the first free elections in 40 years. Moscow appears to approve the program for change in the region that Baker supported in Prague, Czechoslovakia, his first stop, on Tuesday.
NEWS
February 7, 1990
Recent accounts about Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega freeing U.S. funds for poll monitors for the upcoming elections on Feb. 25 was indeed good news. By allowing the Bush Administration, handpicked U.S. members of Congress and the anti-Sandinista coalition (UNO) to monitor all polling places, Ortega has assured that the elections will be certifiable by the entire world and in the best interest of all Nicaraguan people.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, bowing to pressure from America's major allies, has agreed to back a gradual easing of restrictions on the sale of Western goods and technology to Eastern Europe in response to the rapid political changes there, officials said Monday. The decision, made at a meeting of the National Security Council, initially will affect only the sale of some advanced computers, machine tools and telecommunications equipment to Poland and Hungary.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government analysts and Bush Administration policy makers are increasingly worried that the huge social and economic problems of the freshly liberated East Bloc nations could push some of them away from freedom and into the grip of new authoritarian regimes. Senior Administration officials still ardently support the East Bloc reformers, but they say the process of democratization is so fragile it could fall victim to political fragmentation, aggravated by serious economic strains.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You could say that we've won," a senior U.S. official remarked. "Our policy of 'differentiation' in Eastern Europe--of treating each nation differently depending on how they behaved--has succeeded. Or at least, it's been (overtaken by events). In either case, now we need a new construct, a new concept that embraces the region as a whole." Indeed, the remarkable changes that brought down the six regimes of the East Bloc in 1989 have also created a compelling need for a new U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | From Reuters
President Bush will meet with Lithuanian Prime Minister Kazimiera Prunskiene on Thursday to get a firsthand report on conditions in the rebel Baltic republic, but the White House said Tuesday that the talks do not mean a change in U.S. policy. "The President feels that it's important to get an authoritative readout and description of events in Lithuania. . . .
NEWS
December 2, 1989
Following are some of the issues likely to be discussed by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev when they meet on warships in Marsaxlokk Bay: EASTERN EUROPE: The political upheaval in the Soviet-led East Bloc as Poland, Hungary, East Germany and Czechoslovakia move to lift the "Iron Curtain" and introduce democratic reforms.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States on Friday welcomed the bloody ouster of Romania's Nicolae Ceausescu as the end of the last major Stalinist regime in Eastern Europe, but it was a welcome tinged with concern. Romania, without a democratic tradition, faces greater risks of violent nationalist-led turmoil in coming days than any of the other former Soviet Bloc states, U.S. officials believe.
NEWS
December 2, 1989
Following are some of the issues likely to be discussed by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev when they meet on warships in Marsaxlokk Bay: EASTERN EUROPE: The political upheaval in the Soviet-led East Bloc as Poland, Hungary, East Germany and Czechoslovakia move to lift the "Iron Curtain" and introduce democratic reforms.
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