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United States Foreign Policy El Salvador

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NEWS
December 2, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration is expected to announce today that it will end a special refugee program for Salvadoran immigrants, but will use procedures that make it unlikely any would be deported for at least two years--and perhaps far longer, officials said.
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NEWS
December 2, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration is expected to announce today that it will end a special refugee program for Salvadoran immigrants, but will use procedures that make it unlikely any would be deported for at least two years--and perhaps far longer, officials said.
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NEWS
December 11, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Thousands of demonstrators, many chanting for the release of a U.S. church worker imprisoned in Central America, paraded through Seattle in a "March for Human Rights in El Salvador." Many of the estimated 2,000 protesters carried crosses, while others pounded drums as they chanted slogans supporting human rights. Signs carried by some of the demonstrators said "U.S. Imperialism out of El Salvador" and "Free Jennifer Casolo," the U.S.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets of this tiny village are paved with dollars from Los Angeles and other U.S. cities where Salvadorans live, work and prop up their home country's economy. Most houses have tiled floors, iron gates and fresh coats of pastel paint. There is an ambulance. The children wear shoes and ride bicycles, and the church was built with money sent from some of the estimated 1 million Salvadorans who fled the country during 12 years of civil war and now reside in the United States.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | Associated Press
Eighteen trade union activists were arrested Friday outside the White House when they blocked a gate during a peaceful protest over the deaths of labor leaders in El Salvador. The U.S. Park Police said the protesters were charged with demonstrating without a permit, a misdemeanor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989
About 40 people, including religious leaders and political activists, were arrested Wednesday outside the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles in a protest against U.S. support of the government of El Salvador.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1989
Authorities arrested 118 demonstrators Wednesday for blocking entrances to the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles in a protest over U.S. policies in El Salvador. The protest, which attracted about 400 people, was the fifth and largest of weekly demonstrations staged locally since six Jesuit priests were slain in El Salvador in November. Along with denouncing U.S. support of the Salvadoran government, the protesters also criticized this week's U.S. military action against Panama.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court, sidestepping a potentially important test of free-speech guarantees, has decided not to hear a case that had been granted a hearing under former Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird involving a protest at a privately owned shopping center. The court, now led by Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas, issued a brief order Thursday saying the petition for review had been "improvidently granted" and would not be heard by the new court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1990 | TOM McQUEENEY
Joel Montes lay motionless Wednesday on a sidewalk at Cal State Fullerton, his head and torso covered by a white sheet splattered with red paint. On top of the sheet covering Montes, 19, and four other students were two homemade blue-and-white flags, symbolizing the flag of El Salvador. "We just want people to stop, see the bodies and read the signs," said Pauline Kamiyama, 23, who helped organize the protest. The students sponsored the event to protest U.S.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The United States government rarely moves against its allies who flagrantly violate the rights of workers in their countries. So it came as a shock when the government wisely gave in to pressure recently and stopped promoting U.S. investments in South Korea because of blatant repression of workers there. But the opposite side of U.S. policy is evident in countries such as El Salvador, where our government is helping to finance an advertising campaign to persuade U.S.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The United States government rarely moves against its allies who flagrantly violate the rights of workers in their countries. So it came as a shock when the government wisely gave in to pressure recently and stopped promoting U.S. investments in South Korea because of blatant repression of workers there. But the opposite side of U.S. policy is evident in countries such as El Salvador, where our government is helping to finance an advertising campaign to persuade U.S.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's long-stalled request for emergency aid to Nicaragua and Panama cleared its last major hurdle in Congress on Tuesday, even as the House signaled its impatience with human rights abuses in another Central American country by voting to cut U.S. military aid to El Salvador by 50%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a nondescript courtroom in downtown Los Angeles, where a federal magistrate generally handles such routine matters as parking violations and public intoxication, a collection of civic activists instead spent Thursday talking foreign affairs in an attempt to put U.S. policy toward El Salvador on trial. And, in what their lawyer described as an "extremely rare" legal maneuver, U.S. Magistrate Charles F. Eick permitted them to do it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1990 | TOM McQUEENEY
Joel Montes lay motionless Wednesday on a sidewalk at Cal State Fullerton, his head and torso covered by a white sheet splattered with red paint. On top of the sheet covering Montes, 19, and four other students were two homemade blue-and-white flags, symbolizing the flag of El Salvador. "We just want people to stop, see the bodies and read the signs," said Pauline Kamiyama, 23, who helped organize the protest. The students sponsored the event to protest U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most polite way possible, more than 230 extremely polite people were arrested at the doors of the downtown Federal Building on Wednesday, by perhaps a dozen quite polite federal police officers. This must be what they mean by civil disobedience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1989
Authorities arrested 118 demonstrators Wednesday for blocking entrances to the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles in a protest over U.S. policies in El Salvador. The protest, which attracted about 400 people, was the fifth and largest of weekly demonstrations staged locally since six Jesuit priests were slain in El Salvador in November. Along with denouncing U.S. support of the Salvadoran government, the protesters also criticized this week's U.S. military action against Panama.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets of this tiny village are paved with dollars from Los Angeles and other U.S. cities where Salvadorans live, work and prop up their home country's economy. Most houses have tiled floors, iron gates and fresh coats of pastel paint. There is an ambulance. The children wear shoes and ride bicycles, and the church was built with money sent from some of the estimated 1 million Salvadorans who fled the country during 12 years of civil war and now reside in the United States.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | Associated Press
Eighteen trade union activists were arrested Friday outside the White House when they blocked a gate during a peaceful protest over the deaths of labor leaders in El Salvador. The U.S. Park Police said the protesters were charged with demonstrating without a permit, a misdemeanor.
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