Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Policy Europe
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Policy Europe

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after U.S. troops departed this no-longer-divided city, the Yanks came back Friday to secure one last beachhead with the inauguration of the American Academy in Berlin. Although the cultural center in an elegant lakeside villa was envisioned more as a meeting place for writers and artists, the academy's politically minded founders swiftly established their intention to use it as an instrument of the U.S.-German strategic alliance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 9, 2001 | From Reuters
Senior U.S. diplomats launched a global charm offensive Tuesday to drum up support for President Bush's controversial missile defense plans. At North Atlantic Treaty Organization headquarters, the first stop on the European leg of a diplomatic drive that is also scheduled to include Asia, Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Marc Grossman said NATO allies welcomed the consultations and recognized new threats from the spread of weapons of mass destruction.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | JIM MANN
On Thursday, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright is supposed to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Marshall Plan with a speech at Harvard University's commencement--the same setting where then-Secretary of State George C. Marshall unveiled the U.S. plan to provide aid to a war-ravaged Europe. What will Albright say about today's relationship between America and Europe?
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after U.S. troops departed this no-longer-divided city, the Yanks came back Friday to secure one last beachhead with the inauguration of the American Academy in Berlin. Although the cultural center in an elegant lakeside villa was envisioned more as a meeting place for writers and artists, the academy's politically minded founders swiftly established their intention to use it as an instrument of the U.S.-German strategic alliance.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican presidential hopeful Bob Dole attacked President Clinton with harsh rhetoric on policy toward Europe on Tuesday but coupled his denunciations with an agenda that resembled administration policy on some major issues. Clinton's "indecision, vacillation and weakness is making the world a more dangerous place," Dole declared in a speech to Philadelphia's World Affairs Council.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | ART PINE and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Mayor Wolfgang Hamberger thinks about the state of relations between Western Europe and the United States, what worries him is not friction over the value of the dollar, trade barriers or who's to blame for not doing what in Bosnia. Nor is it the way American soldiers behaved year after year in this town of baroque churches and gingerbread houses in the countryside 20 miles west of the old Iron Curtain; he insists they handled themselves remarkably well.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Ending what he proclaimed a "historic week in Europe," President Clinton turned toward foreign policy challenges at home Saturday, including the possibility of a longer U.S. mission in Bosnia and questions about the costs of expanding NATO. Ten of thousands of Danes cheered Clinton during his visit to Denmark, the first by a U.S. president. Copenhagen was the last stop on an eight-day trip that took Clinton from Spain to Poland, Romania and Denmark.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the face of it, NATO's imminent invitation to three of its former enemies to join the alliance stands out as President Clinton's premier achievement in foreign policy, a plan he sponsored, promoted and sold to wary allies.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush is approaching the 34-nation European summit in Paris on Monday confident that the United States will achieve its goals in shaping new institutions to help manage the evolution of Europe in the post-Cold War era. As the three-day parley gets under way, the United States already has won assurances on its two biggest concerns: Washington will continue to have a voice in European affairs and the new institutions that Europe creates this week will not diminish the role of NATO.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling the possibility of a split with two key allies on the future shape of European defense, a senior Bush Administration official says there is strong concern in the White House over a French and German plan to create a joint military force. His concern, expressed in an interview with The Times, is the first indication from within the upper reaches of the Administration that the Franco-German proposal is seen as a potentially troublesome development.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vice president of the German Parliament felt slighted. In a meeting with U.S. Ambassador John Kornblum, she claimed, he seemed so bored that she began counting his yawns. "It was very close to impolite," said Antje Vollmer, a veteran lawmaker from the environmentalist Greens party. While Kornblum strenuously rejects this interpretation of his demeanor, Vollmer saw it as part of a larger U.S.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate opponents of NATO expansion continued Wednesday to drag out debate on the plan, but the delays showed no signs of ultimately derailing the expected addition of Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic to the alliance. Reinforcing its reputation as the world's most talkative club, the Senate droned through a third day of discussion, considering amendments--from accounting for service personnel missing in action from the Vietnam War to U.S. military policy in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Ending what he proclaimed a "historic week in Europe," President Clinton turned toward foreign policy challenges at home Saturday, including the possibility of a longer U.S. mission in Bosnia and questions about the costs of expanding NATO. Ten of thousands of Danes cheered Clinton during his visit to Denmark, the first by a U.S. president. Copenhagen was the last stop on an eight-day trip that took Clinton from Spain to Poland, Romania and Denmark.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the face of it, NATO's imminent invitation to three of its former enemies to join the alliance stands out as President Clinton's premier achievement in foreign policy, a plan he sponsored, promoted and sold to wary allies.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | JIM MANN
On Thursday, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright is supposed to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Marshall Plan with a speech at Harvard University's commencement--the same setting where then-Secretary of State George C. Marshall unveiled the U.S. plan to provide aid to a war-ravaged Europe. What will Albright say about today's relationship between America and Europe?
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a symbol of the United States' long-term commitment to Europe, President Clinton on Wednesday visited this booming Dutch port that was bombed to rubble in World War II, and residents greeted him with a "Thank you, America" rally in honor of the U.S. aid that saved their city.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, getting a fast start in global diplomacy, plans a marathon tour of America's NATO allies this month that may touch down in 14 countries in one week, the State Department announced Tuesday. Baker wants to visit the foreign minister of every NATO member, "each one in his own capital," State Department spokesman Charles Redman said. " . . . If that's possible," he added.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost a quarter of the way through its four-year mandate, the Bush Administration has renewed the traditional American claim to Western leadership. In President Bush's summit Saturday with French President Francois Mitterrand on this sunny island in the French West Indies, and in Secretary of State James A. Baker III's weeklong European trip, the Administration served notice that the United States is determined to play a role in shaping Europe for the post-Cold War era.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the start of his current European swing, President Clinton has tried to convey one overriding message: The historical parallel for his controversial initiative to redraw the security map of Europe is the Marshall Plan. Tactically, the comparison makes political sense. The late Secretary of State George C. Marshall's plan to give an exhausted Europe billions of dollars to rebuild from the ashes of World War II was wildly successful.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day it could be hailed as a giant step toward uniting Europe as a community of like-minded democracies, a means of stabilizing a part of the world where wars have claimed well in excess of 50 million lives this century. Or it could turn out to be a horrific blunder that merely divided Europe along new lines and needlessly turned Russia and its decaying nuclear arsenal once again against the West.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|