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United States Foreign Policy Haiti

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July 28, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an unprecedented partisan broadside, four of the Republican Party's biggest foreign policy guns raked President Clinton on Wednesday for undermining U.S. prestige abroad, weakening U.S. defenses and--most of all--being inconsistent in his leadership. "With Haiti, the Administration seems to have changed policies more often than most of us change our shirts--and it's July in Washington," said former Secretary of State James A.
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NEWS
June 3, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relations between the United States and Haiti haven't been quite the same since Pastor Antoine Leroy and Jacques Florival were gunned down outside Florival's home in a suburb of Port-au-Prince under mysterious circumstances in August. Third World killings rarely have an impact on American politics and policy, but this was no ordinary murder case. Leroy and Florival were right-wing political opponents of Haitian President Rene Preval, a key client of the Clinton administration.
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NEWS
September 18, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On what could be the eve of a U.S.-led invasion of their tormented homeland, the parishioners of Notre Dame d'Haiti Roman Catholic Church will don their Sunday best today and pray for a quick end to any bloodshed. The cause may be a just one, they allow, but the fact remains that once again lives may be lost in the Caribbean. "As in all wars, some innocents will pay for it," said Jean Destine, a social worker who took his 11-year-old son to a peace vigil that broke up after sunrise Saturday.
NEWS
September 14, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration sent a team of diplomatic security agents to Haiti on Friday to help protect Haitian President Rene Garcia Preval while he purges his personal security force of suspected political assassins. The administration decided to send the agents after Preval, who was inaugurated in February, expressed apprehension that his life might be in jeopardy if he tried to rid his own security force of undesirable elements without added protection. The sudden U.S.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. military could hardly ask for an easier target. If the United States intervenes in Haiti, as President Clinton has been threatening for several months, U.S. troops are unlikely to encounter any fierce opposition. In fact, there may be no opposition at all, military strategists say. Haiti has virtually no air force or navy, defense experts say, and the Haitian army--though 7,400 strong on paper--is poorly equipped and assigned to a variety of side jobs, such as firefighting.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton is considering the use of U.S. military aircraft to enforce a U.N. embargo on flights in and out of Haiti, including forcing down planes suspected of carrying supporters of the island nation's military regime, officials said Saturday. The move is one of several that Clinton is contemplating to make the U.N. embargo effective and concentrate its impact on the Haitian regime, which the United States wants to push from power, officials said.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | MIKE CLARY and MELISSA HEALY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the Bush Administration struggles to develop a policy to cope with the thousands of people fleeing Haiti, the government's refugee camp here on the southeast Cuban coast is taking on an air of permanence. On Friday, Camp McCalla was filled to capacity with 12,500 Haitians who once were headed for the United States in wooden sailboats. Intercepted by the U.S.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long, frustrating day of negotiations with Haiti's military rulers last Saturday night, former President Jimmy Carter abruptly excused himself from a dinner with Haitian businessmen, closeted himself in his suite in Port-au-Prince's Villa Creole Hotel and typed for an hour on his laptop computer. The page that he produced--and handed to Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras a few hours later--became the first draft of what soon evolved into the American agreement with Haiti's military regime.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two idols are under construction in this seaside village's primitive shipyard. One is real: a 30-foot red, white and blue wooden sailboat. The other is a dream: President-elect Bill Clinton as savior. The boat sits a few yards from the lapping waves of Port-au-Prince Bay. The vessel, as well as the seven others under construction here, are ideal for shoreline sailing, toting light cargo from nearby town to town and sometimes carrying passengers.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To his most devoted followers, he is a latter-day Old Testament prophet whose jeremiads against the mistreatment of Haiti's long-suffering poor bring down the wrath of the Establishment, religious as well as secular. To his severest detractors, he is a political radical and a madman.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
U.S. authorities have moved to return hundreds of fleeing Haitians to their homeland over the last several days as uncertainty over next month's election and an eruption of violence on the island have triggered a new refugee exodus. A vessel loaded with 581 Haitian refugees was stopped Sunday off the coast of Andros Island in the Bahamas, on its way to Florida; another overloaded craft sank, drowning 47. In all, more than 1,100 Haitians have been interdicted at sea in the last week. Although U.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The facts in the case of Army Capt. Lawrence Rockwood vs. the United States were never in dispute. Both the defense and prosecution agreed that on Sept. 30, 1994, while serving with U.S. forces in Haiti, Rockwood left his post without authorization, sneaked out of the Army's secured compound and hitched a ride with a Haitian to the national prison in downtown Port-au-Prince.
NEWS
April 4, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An investigation of a senior Cabinet official implicated in a failed plot to assassinate a leading government critic has widened after reports that the men arrested in the plot could have been involved in her subsequent death, U.S. and Haitian officials said Monday. The expanded investigation of Interior Minister Mondesir Beaubrun's role follows reports that two brothers arrested in the failed plot may have been out of jail at the time attorney Mireille Durocher was killed last week.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will arrive today to mark the end of the major U.S. military presence here and will be greeted by a still-thankful nation, but one increasingly convinced that U.S. policy is to blame for Haiti's growing lawlessness and a brutal economic crisis. Clinton will officially turn over to the United Nations responsibility for following through on policies that began Sept. 19, when 20,000 U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 300 Haitians, somber and disconsolate, were forcibly returned to their country Saturday as the United States stepped up its program to clear the refugees out of their haven at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Boutwell arrived at midmorning with 289 refugees. Some had been at Guantanamo since last summer after fleeing Haiti's poverty and political terror in makeshift and overloaded rafts.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After rejecting a final offer of $80 in cash and the chance for a job if they volunteered to return home, nearly 4,000 Haitian refugees remaining in detention camps at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, faced being shipped home anyway--by force if necessary, officials said Thursday. As the 4:30 p.m.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is planning a ban on all air traffic, including passenger service, between Haiti and the United States, as well as a cutoff of financial transactions with the Caribbean nation, diplomatic and Haitian officials say. The actions, described by a U.S. official as "the next logical step," would augment already stringent international economic and financial sanctions that have stopped all but commercial passenger air traffic.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The generals still give the orders, and their gunmen still rule the streets. But as diplomats and Haitians look to scenarios for the future, the vision isn't pretty--especially, they say, if the United States succeeds in restoring President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Almost every Haitian expert and most foreign sources interviewed over a week's time agreed that, as one leading businessman put it, "there is no other option to the (U.S.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has begun pressuring the United Nations to allow U.S. forces in Haiti to turn over their peacekeeping responsibilities to U.N. troops in January or February, rather than after Haitian elections later next year, U.S. officials said Tuesday. U.S. strategists met privately in Washington with senior U.N. officials earlier this week to begin mapping plans for transferring the peacekeeping mission to a 6,000-soldier multinational force, as provided for in the long-range U.S.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 230 unaccompanied Haitian children being held in a U.S. detention camp in Cuba should be allowed to enter the country under the same humanitarian parole being granted Cuban refugees, a federal judge ruled Tuesday. Furthermore, said U.S. District Judge C. Clyde Atkins, legal counsel must be provided to all refugees who request it in writing, and the names of each of the 5,993 Haitians being held in the tent city at the U.S. naval base must be given to refugee advocates here.
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