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United States Foreign Policy Haiti

NEWS
December 7, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has begun pressuring the United Nations to allow U.S. forces in Haiti to turn over their peacekeeping responsibilities to U.N. troops in January or February, rather than after Haitian elections later next year, U.S. officials said Tuesday. U.S. strategists met privately in Washington with senior U.N. officials earlier this week to begin mapping plans for transferring the peacekeeping mission to a 6,000-soldier multinational force, as provided for in the long-range U.S.
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NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 230 unaccompanied Haitian children being held in a U.S. detention camp in Cuba should be allowed to enter the country under the same humanitarian parole being granted Cuban refugees, a federal judge ruled Tuesday. Furthermore, said U.S. District Judge C. Clyde Atkins, legal counsel must be provided to all refugees who request it in writing, and the names of each of the 5,993 Haitians being held in the tent city at the U.S. naval base must be given to refugee advocates here.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As word finally reached Camp Dragon of President Clinton's visit to U.S. forces in Kuwait last week, a wave of resentment swept Sunday through the former swamp and garbage dump that houses many of the 16,000 U.S. troops still in Haiti. Against the backdrop of a military mission that senior U.S.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and his top aides declared the U.S. intervention in Haiti a success Thursday, seeking to persuade Congress and the public that the effort is working--and that it is worth continuing. Both houses of Congress, bowing to the Administration's arguments, backed away from earlier attempts to impose a deadline for withdrawing U.S. troops from the nation. The Senate and House, persuaded by the Pentagon that a deadline could endanger U.S.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I call it the Haitian Shuffle. You take three steps forward, two back and one to the side. You've moved ahead, but you're slightly off course." This analysis came from an intelligence source inspired by a Latin dance tune playing on the radio as he discussed the problems and successes of the U.S. military operation here. "The successes?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Vice President Dan Quayle criticized President Clinton's Haiti policy Wednesday, calling it a "terrible precedent" to send American troops to the Caribbean nation to restore exiled President Jean Bertrand Aristide. "Aristide was duly elected, I admit that," Quayle said at a speech sponsored by CARE, one of the largest private relief programs in the world. "But you have to recognize that some people who come through the democratic process do not necessarily subscribe to democratic values."
NEWS
October 3, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of U.S. troops were deployed in beefed-up patrols of Port-au-Prince on Sunday, detaining a top aide of Haitian military leader Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras during a weapons search and saturating urban neighborhoods where four days of looting and state-sponsored violence had left the capital exhausted but peaceful.
NEWS
October 3, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. troops will themselves begin disarming the Haitian attaches who have attacked pro-democracy demonstrators if Haiti's police and military do not, a senior senator said Sunday after returning with the first congressional delegation to visit the Caribbean nation since U.S. forces intervened there. The difficult and potentially dangerous operation, in which U.S.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With their tactics and rules changing by the day and the hour, U.S. forces took futile steps Saturday to stop looting and searched seven sites for illegal weapons. But U.S. commanders left the city largely in the hands of the remnants of the Haitian police force and the same civilian gunmen who had brutally crushed a mass pro-democracy rally 24 hours before. Teams of U.S.
NEWS
September 30, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Benjamin clutched his shrapnel wounds Thursday as he lay bleeding on top of his protest poster with the red-and-blue paint declaring, "First Justice, Then Reconciliation." Wincing as he waited for the ambulance in the blistering afternoon sun, the young pro-democracy demonstrator summed up the most brutal attack by Haiti's paramilitary forces since the U.S. military landed here to put an end to just such horror.
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