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United States Foreign Policy Indonesia

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NEWS
January 29, 1997 | JIM MANN
Is the Clinton administration serious this time? Or is this yet another Washington version of an Indonesian shadow play? Those are the questions that come to mind about President Clinton's Asia policy in the early days of his second term. For strange as it may sound, given the role Indonesian-linked money has played in the furor over Democratic Party fund-raising, Clinton is quietly laying the groundwork for what could be a new, tougher policy to combat Indonesia's repressive labor practices.
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NEWS
September 9, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after leading NATO into a 78-day air campaign to stop "ethnic cleansing" in Kosovo and serving notice it would not let such human-rights atrocities go unchallenged again, the Clinton administration has decided to limit its military role in halting yet another convulsion of organized killing, this time in East Timor. "The United States is not planning on any insertion of peacekeeping forces" in the Indonesian province, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen stated Wednesday.
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NEWS
November 9, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton expressed support for embattled Democratic fund-raiser John Huang on Friday, saying that he had the kind of business experience and international contacts that "we would be looking for" in senior Commerce Department positions. The president also said at a White House press conference that, though he had a long-standing relationship with Indonesian business executive James Riady, he had "absolutely not" shaded administration policy toward Indonesia as a result of it.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration has decided to stick by Indonesian President Suharto rather than press for the aging leader to step down or make far-reaching political changes in his authoritarian regime, administration officials say. Over the past month, the administration has grown increasingly worried about the deteriorating economic and political situation in Indonesia, which is the fourth most populous nation and next to some of the world's most important sea lanes.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration has decided to stick by Indonesian President Suharto rather than press for the aging leader to step down or make far-reaching political changes in his authoritarian regime, administration officials say. Over the past month, the administration has grown increasingly worried about the deteriorating economic and political situation in Indonesia, which is the fourth most populous nation and next to some of the world's most important sea lanes.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after leading NATO into a 78-day air campaign to stop "ethnic cleansing" in Kosovo and serving notice it would not let such human-rights atrocities go unchallenged again, the Clinton administration has decided to limit its military role in halting yet another convulsion of organized killing, this time in East Timor. "The United States is not planning on any insertion of peacekeeping forces" in the Indonesian province, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen stated Wednesday.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | JIM MANN
Is the Clinton administration serious this time? Or is this yet another Washington version of an Indonesian shadow play? Those are the questions that come to mind about President Clinton's Asia policy in the early days of his second term. For strange as it may sound, given the role Indonesian-linked money has played in the furor over Democratic Party fund-raising, Clinton is quietly laying the groundwork for what could be a new, tougher policy to combat Indonesia's repressive labor practices.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton expressed support for embattled Democratic fund-raiser John Huang on Friday, saying that he had the kind of business experience and international contacts that "we would be looking for" in senior Commerce Department positions. The president also said at a White House press conference that, though he had a long-standing relationship with Indonesian business executive James Riady, he had "absolutely not" shaded administration policy toward Indonesia as a result of it.
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