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United States Foreign Policy Iran

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August 13, 1996 | From Reuters
Iran and Turkey on Monday struck a natural gas supply deal worth $23 billion, just a week after a new U.S. law penalizing foreign investment in Iran's energy sector was enacted. Iran will start supplying Turkey with 105 billion cubic feet of natural gas a year in 1999, rising to 350 billion in 2005, Iran First Vice President Hassan Habibi said at a joint news conference with Turkish Prime Minister Necmettin Erbakan in Tehran.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alireza Mahdavi had barely returned home to Westwood from his native Iran when a cousin embroiled him in a familiar, passionate debate, one rocking the Iranian diaspora across the country. Mahdavi hopes the United States will lift the economic sanctions it placed on Iran. His cousin wants them to stay. "Over the dinner table, he asked me, 'Why are you wasting your time going back and forth to Iran, promoting the lifting of sanctions when you could be growing your business in the United States?'
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NEWS
January 9, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite their cautious reaction in public, senior U.S. officials privately expressed quiet enthusiasm Thursday about Iranian President Mohammad Khatami's opening to the American people. "It may take awhile, but we finally appear to be heading in the right direction," a senior Clinton administration official said. After Khatami's remarks, televised worldwide Wednesday in an interview with the Cable News Network, U.S.
NEWS
March 18, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging past mistakes in U.S. policy toward Iran, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Friday launched a major overture to Tehran that could open up trade, expedite settlement of frozen assets and lead to a renewal of formal diplomatic relations after 20 years of hostility.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most serious U.S. attempt in a decade to engage Iran in dialogue, the Clinton administration has quietly signaled through diplomatic channels that it seeks to improve the volatile relationship between Tehran and Washington. "We would like to end the estrangement," a senior administration official said. "And we are now looking for ways to accomplish that goal." The U.S.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush was tricked earlier this year into taking a telephone call from a man who pretended to be Iran's President Hashemi Rafsanjani and who said he wanted to speak about U.S. hostages in Lebanon, the White House said Thursday. White House officials provided few details of the call but confirmed the incident after it was first reported Thursday evening on CBS News.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite growing evidence that Iran is pushing for an early end to the Lebanon hostage crisis and attempting to ease its international isolation, the Bush Administration is resisting suggestions--some from within its own ranks--that it should move to improve relations with the Islamic republic. For now, the Administration has concluded it should maintain its deep-freeze policy toward Iran, even if all Western hostages are released soon, a senior Administration official said.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Pro-Iranian extremists said Sunday that they would kill two American hostages and might attack targets inside the United States if U.S. warships in the Persian Gulf launched new attacks on Iran. The statement came hours after an Iranian gunboat attacked a Saudi Arabian tanker in the gulf despite a warning by President Reagan that Iran faces "very costly" consequences if it continues hitting neutral ships and refuses to end its war with Iraq.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
A Tehran newspaper called on the Bush Administration on Tuesday to release frozen Iranian assets in the United States, suggesting that in return Iran would help to free U.S. hostages now being held by Islamic militants in Lebanon. The overture brought a quick rebuff from the White House, which reiterated its policy against making deals with terrorists to win hostages' freedom.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
Bush Administration officials Friday welcomed conciliatory statements by Iran's new president but warned that apparent openings to Tehran in the past repeatedly have proven illusory. "When you see a statement that offers hope for the return of our hostages, I want to explore it to the fullest," Bush said in response to Iranian President Hashemi Rafsanjani's offer to help find "solutions" to the five-year hostage crisis. But, Bush added, "I don't know what--what it means fully."
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slowly, if somewhat unsteadily, the last wall is coming down. Two decades after the student takeover of the U.S. Embassy here ignited a deep and enduring animosity between former allies, Americans are back in Iran. Iranians are back in the United States. And Iranian President Mohammad Khatami's appeal for people-to-people exchanges has begun to bring down a barrier characterized as "the wall of mistrust."
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | Reuters
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, in a move aimed at improving ties with Tehran, has recommended that President Clinton remove Iran from the U.S. list of major illicit drug-producing countries, a senior U.S. official said Monday. A new U.S. survey has concluded that Iran has eradicated much of its illicit poppy cultivation and thus it "no longer meets the statutory justification" for inclusion on the list, the official said. Being on the list means Iran is "decertified" from receiving U.S.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top U.S. military commander in the Middle East attacked on Wednesday a congressional plan to help opposition groups attempt to topple Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, charging that the proposal could divide Iraq, set off an Arab blood bath and dangerously destabilize the region. Marine Corps Gen. Anthony Zinni, who heads the U.S.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With ranking U.S. officials in the audience, Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi on Monday called for new cooperation between Tehran and Washington on terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and international narcotics trafficking, while inviting U.S. businesses to play a role in developing Iran's economy.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To signal interest in rapprochement with Iran and to avert a trade war with Europe, President Clinton is likely to announce within days that the United States will waive economic sanctions against a Russian, French and Malaysian consortium for the biggest foreign investment in Iran since its 1979 revolution, according to U.S. and European officials. Final details of a compromise are still being worked out with European allies in talks in Brussels.
NEWS
April 16, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most sweeping initiative toward Tehran by a U.S. official since Iran's 1979 revolution, a ranking congressional Democrat called Wednesday for the White House and Congress to take far-reaching steps to end containment of Iran and open the way to restoring diplomatic ties. By proposing strong steps to hasten the thaw in relations, Rep. Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.
NEWS
February 6, 1989
Iranian President Ali Khamenei said that diplomatic relations with Washington will not be possible until the United States abandons its hostile posture toward Iran, Tehran Radio said. "There can be no change in our stance against America, unless there is a change in American foreign policy toward Iran," the official broadcast quoted Khamenei as saying.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Excerpts from the Friday prayer sermon by Iranian President Hashemi Rafsanjani, translated from Farsi by Associated Press: A country by the name of Israel, which is from the root up a usurper, officially enters a town with military forces, with a helicopter, and takes the Friday prayer leader of the town along with two of his security men. This is not at all acceptable by any international standard, and no country can say this is right. No international law can condone this action. . . .
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months after the first diplomatic opening in a generation between the United States and Iran, the Clinton administration is deeply concerned that rapprochement is now threatened by a fierce power struggle between Mohammad Khatami, the reformist Iranian president, and hard-line conservatives in his country. The effect of the escalating political battle was felt here this week as the White House scrambled to atone for the clumsy way U.S.
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