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United States Foreign Policy Iraq

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NEWS
November 3, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Family members of American hostages in Iraq say they are deeply torn by President Saddam Hussein's offer to let them visit their loved ones over Christmas--revolted by the obvious attempt at manipulation but desperate to bring some comfort as best they can. "It may be the women's last chance to see their husbands," said Leslie Kern, a Columbus, Ohio, psychologist who has organized a voluntary nationwide counseling service for families of American hostages in the Persian Gulf.
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NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a year of internal divisions and military diversions, serious planning is underway within the Bush administration for a campaign against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. The administration expects to complete a long-delayed Iraq policy review by the time Vice President Dick Cheney makes his nine-nation Mideast tour next month, so that he can outline American plans to Arab leaders, according to senior U.S. officials. Any denouement in Iraq is still a long way off, the officials insist.
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NEWS
September 10, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping up the confrontation between Congress and the White House over U.S.-Iraq policy, Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) has rejected an Administration attempt to avoid providing the House Banking Committee with classified documents on its prewar relations with Iraq. In a letter released Wednesday, Foley rebuffed a proposal that he control access to classified material subpoenaed by the Banking Committee.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sharp rebuke to U.S. policy on Iraq, a senior Egyptian official bluntly told Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Saturday that Iraq is no longer a threat to the region and that the time has come to reconsider the decade-old embargo on Baghdad. "Sanctions should be reconsidered as a weapon or as one of the procedures that the [U.N.] Security Council resorts to," Foreign Minister Amr Moussa said at a joint news conference after Powell held talks with Moussa and President Hosni Mubarak.
NEWS
September 2, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusually harsh criticism of White House foreign policy in the midst of a potential crisis, Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole said Sunday that the fighting in Iraq was the result of a "failure of American leadership." Tackling the Clinton administration on broader foreign policy issues, Dole also faulted what he said was a "harmful and embarrassing" intervention in Israel's election and a reluctance to challenge terrorists.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many Americans, Cal State Fullerton sophomore Claudia Mendez had a brief glimmer of hope Friday when she heard news reports that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had offered to pull his troops out of Kuwait. "I was so happy, the first thing I thought was that my 18-year-old brother wouldn't have to go," Mendez said. "But then later, they said it was a hoax and I thought, 'Oh well, back to the same thing again.'
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a new round of threats against the U.S.-led coalition in the Persian Gulf, Iraq has quietly begun dispersing ground troops, tanks and artillery in the south in anticipation of allied bombing, U.S. officials said Friday. "Iraq apparently does not want to have a large concentration of its mechanized army in any one place, so troops have begun dispersing," one official said. Another informed source, who said the movement was being monitored by U.S.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton approves an airstrike against Iraq--and the American public rewards him with enthusiastic support and rising popularity. That, at least, is how events unfolded five years ago, shortly after Clinton became the nation's commander in chief. But today, as the White House weighs a punishing series of air attacks on Iraq, with the possibility of many civilian deaths and mortal risk to U.S. fliers, Clinton confronts a situation unlike any he has faced during his presidency.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1998 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. cruise missiles pounded Iraqi targets for a second day, oil prices resumed their downward trend and stock prices of major defense companies finished down Thursday, reflecting the widespread belief that the military campaign will have little immediate impact on either industry. Oil traders noted no damage thus far to Iraq's crude supplies and only a small crimp in the flow of oil exports into an already abundant market. They responded by sending crude oil prices down $1.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a decade-long U.N. embargo on air travel to Iraq, the Saddam International Airport has started to bustle again, with planes carrying few passengers but packed with political significance. On Sunday, a Palestinian Airlines flight became the 36th of a new breed of arrival to touch down in Baghdad since a Russian Yak-42 carrying oil executives first challenged the embargo in August.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush presidency's foreign policy priorities are still under review, but already the new administration is experiencing its first internal fractures over how to salvage U.S. policy toward Iraq. Two distinct factions are emerging as President Bush's foreign policy team debates the best way to follow through on the administration's pledge to increase pressure on Baghdad, U.S. officials acknowledge. The biggest difference between the two camps involves the depth of U.S.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a decade-long U.N. embargo on air travel to Iraq, the Saddam International Airport has started to bustle again, with planes carrying few passengers but packed with political significance. On Sunday, a Palestinian Airlines flight became the 36th of a new breed of arrival to touch down in Baghdad since a Russian Yak-42 carrying oil executives first challenged the embargo in August.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appears to be escalating brinkmanship, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has been orchestrating a series of provocative acts designed to lure the United States into a military response and focus world debate on U.S. policy toward Iraq, Clinton administration officials say. Over the past six weeks, Baghdad has threatened the Kurdish regions in northern Iraq, called for the overthrow of monarchies in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, banned visits by humanitarian aid workers and a new team of U.N.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine years after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait threw the strategic Persian Gulf into crisis, the United States has reached a crunch point in policy. The Clinton administration must decide over the next month whether to do battle with some of its own allies to keep alive a policy aimed at undoing the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein--or compromise in ways that might help a leader who was once compared to Adolf Hitler stay in power. The core of the U.S.
NEWS
March 6, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past 10 weeks, U.S. fighter pilots have been taking off from this floating air base into a zone of heightened danger in the skies over Iraq. Ever since Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's military directive in December calling on his troops to resist allied aircraft at all costs, the rules of the game have changed. Almost daily now, U.S. and British pilots find themselves being targeted by radar, missiles or conventional antiaircraft artillery.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Initially envisioned as a simple enforcement action, the near-daily assaults by U.S. warplanes in Iraq are rapidly escalating into a war of attrition that could go on as long as the Arab world and the American public continue to give their silent assent. The low-intensity campaign that began Dec. 28 already has become the longest sustained U.S. air operation since the Vietnam War.
NEWS
September 2, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After six years of leading the world community against Iraq, the United States almost cannot avoid responding to the latest aggression by President Saddam Hussein--his assault on the Kurdish enclave in the north of Iraq. Washington once again may be forced to act--despite an array of complicating factors and a growing frustration in the U.S. that a short war five years ago turned into an open-ended commitment--or risk that Hussein will finally win a round in their long-standing confrontation.
NEWS
September 2, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration prepared Sunday for what looked likely to be a military response to Iraq's invasion of its U.S.-protected Kurdish north, amid claims that Saddam Hussein's Republican Guard had massacred nearly 100 army defectors and launched new attacks in the region. U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration intends to propose that the United Nations lift all limits on Iraq's ability to export oil to pay for the basic requirements of daily life, in what would be the most significant change in sanctions on Baghdad since they were imposed eight years ago, according to U.S. officials. The administration's plan was revealed Wednesday as France offered the U.N.
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