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United States Foreign Policy Israel

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March 19, 1990 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among California Jewish leaders, there may be as many opinions about the current political crisis in Israel as there are political parties in that country's Parliament, the Knesset. "I can't imagine anyone being happy" about the fall of the Israeli government, said liberal Peace-Now activist Stanley Sheinbaum. "Because if ever Israel should be in a situation to deal rationally with the problems it's facing, this kind of political turbulence precludes getting to the resolution of its problems."
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NEWS
May 28, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a four-day visit that often angered Palestinians with its unstinting support for Israel and its policies, a delegation led by House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) met with Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat on Wednesday for a talk that both sides described as positive.
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NEWS
March 6, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush, seeking to repair a growing rift between the United States and Israel over the continued settlement of Israeli-occupied Arab territories, publicly renewed his support Monday for a united Jerusalem and for the right of Jews to live there.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Igniting a controversy at home, House Speaker Newt Gingrich told the Israeli parliament Tuesday that Congress supports Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's reasons for rejecting a U.S. plan to break a 14-month stalemate in the Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations. Although Gingrich's remarks to the Knesset were tamer than some of his comments on the subject in Washington of late, the speech trampled on the tradition that U.S.
NEWS
December 22, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Personally and politically, President Clinton may have more riding on the search for a lasting Middle East peace than on any other foreign policy issue.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing away from some of the provocative assertions he made during his career as a journalist, Strobe Talbott expressed unreserved support for Israel on Tuesday and said that the United States should never use foreign aid to pressure friendly democracies into changing course.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reports that the United States might back a U.N. call to hold an international conference on the Israeli-Palestinian dispute sent shivers through the government of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir on Thursday, just as he began a trip to London and Washington for his first visits since the Persian Gulf crisis broke out. The Bush Administration strongly denied that it supports holding such a conference now.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, acknowledging the deep reservoir of mutual distrust facing his new Arab-Israeli peace initiative, said Sunday that both sides must move simultaneously to adopt "confidence-building measures" because neither side can be expected to make the first concession. "Nobody should have to go first," Baker said.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III enjoys a well-deserved reputation as a formidable negotiator. This week, he's putting that reputation on the line. For seven months, Baker has been shuttling between Washington and the Middle East, trying to cajole Arab and Israeli leaders into peace talks to end their 43-year state of war.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seemingly confident but increasingly reticent, Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in the Middle East on Sunday to try to soothe Arab and Israeli anxiety over conditions for a peace conference. During Baker's 12-hour flight from Washington to Cairo, the State Department announced that he will confer Friday with Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin. There's nothing unusual about that: Baker has met 12 times this year with Pankin or his predecessor, Alexander A. Bessmertnykh.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost a year after Benjamin Netanyahu narrowly won election by promising a new way to make peace, the Israeli prime minister is heading to the United States this weekend with his approach to the Palestinians nearing the put-up-or-shut-up stage.
NEWS
December 22, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Personally and politically, President Clinton may have more riding on the search for a lasting Middle East peace than on any other foreign policy issue.
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | Associated Press
Dismissing reports of a policy change, the State Department on Tuesday reaffirmed the U.S. position that the final status of Jerusalem should be decided by the parties in negotiations. "There has been no change in our position on Jerusalem," State Department spokesman Mike McCurry said. He attributed the confusion to an "erroneous press report."
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing away from some of the provocative assertions he made during his career as a journalist, Strobe Talbott expressed unreserved support for Israel on Tuesday and said that the United States should never use foreign aid to pressure friendly democracies into changing course.
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Clinton, sounding more like a President-in-office than a President-elect, sent up a flurry of crisp foreign policy signals on Thursday, urging Serbs to vote their hard-line government out of office and saying he would wait for U.N. endorsement before deploying U.S. warplanes over Bosnia-Herzegovina. Discarding any remaining reticence about speaking out on foreign affairs, Clinton also asked Israel to halt its mass expulsion of Palestinians, assured Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Presumptive Democratic nominee Bill Clinton accused President Bush on Tuesday of following a policy of "appeasement" toward Saddam Hussein in the years before the Gulf War, launching a sharp attack at Bush's point of greatest political strength--his experience in foreign policy. Speaking before an audience of Jewish community leaders in Washington and, by satellite, in Los Angeles, Clinton delivered a series of lines certain to please supporters of Israel.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Battling for the support of the state's Jewish voters, Sen. Pete Wilson and his Democratic challenger, Lt. Gov. Leo T. McCarthy, traded charges Monday over whether either of them had ever supported creation of a Palestinian homeland in Israel's West Bank.
NEWS
June 7, 1988
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, unable to achieve a breakthrough in his Mideast peace talks, took time out to visit 4,000-year-old monuments at Luxor, Egypt. Accompanied by an archeologist and a retinue of aides and reporters, Shultz paused before a temple relief depicting Pharaoh Ramses III receiving severed hands and other parts of his defeated enemies. "What an area," Shultz remarked.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Israel possesses a nuclear weapons arsenal far larger than the United States has suspected and has gone on full nuclear alert three times in the past, according to a new book. "The Samson Option," by investigative reporter Seymour Hersh, is to be published today. The New York Times reported on the book in today's editions. Hersh writes that Israel now possesses 300 or more nuclear warheads mounted on artillery shells, in land mines on the occupied Golan Heights and on missiles.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seemingly confident but increasingly reticent, Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in the Middle East on Sunday to try to soothe Arab and Israeli anxiety over conditions for a peace conference. During Baker's 12-hour flight from Washington to Cairo, the State Department announced that he will confer Friday with Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin. There's nothing unusual about that: Baker has met 12 times this year with Pankin or his predecessor, Alexander A. Bessmertnykh.
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