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United States Foreign Policy Japan

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NEWS
June 29, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, the United States and Japan have gone to the brink in a trade dispute and, at the last gasping moment, tiptoed back from it. Once again, Washington and Tokyo have managed to avoid letting commercial frictions undermine the essential bargain forged between them during the Cold War--that the United States would help guarantee Japan's security in exchange for the right to keep troops on Japanese soil. Now the question is whether that relationship can last--and for how long.
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NEWS
August 25, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Don't look now but Japan is developing a more independent military capability just in case its alliance with the United States should someday fall apart. That is the blunt conclusion drawn by the U.S. intelligence community in two reports over the last three months. These soberly written studies say that Japan is now "hedging its bets" by strengthening its security ties to the United States while preparing for a time when Japan may stand on its own.
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NEWS
June 4, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House has concluded that it will be unable to reduce the growing trade deficit with Japan during President Clinton's first term and no longer considers doing so a key political objective, the Administration's chief trade negotiator indicated Friday. Instead of aiming for a specific reduction in the U.S.-Japan trade deficit, now about $60 billion a year, the Administration will emphasize Clinton's efforts to increase exports in select industries, U.S.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each of the three times President Clinton has visited Japan, he has come with different priorities and a different image of the country. In 1993, he came here on his first overseas trip to try to deal with Japan the Powerhouse. In early 1996, the president flew here to cultivate Japan the Military Partner. Now he's trying to rejuvenate Japan the Sluggard.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite President Clinton's tough talk about Japan's trade policy, the Administration appears to lack both a grand strategy and a day-by-day game plan for prying open Japan's markets, according to government sources and trade experts. In the aftermath of the unsuccessful talks Feb. 11 between Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, a senior U.S. official admitted privately a week later, "We've been trying to figure out what to do next."
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several years ago, when Tsutomu Hata was the agriculture minister in the Japanese government run by the Liberal Democrats, he drew a firm line: Not a grain of foreign rice would be allowed into Japan. Now, he is foreign minister in the governing coalition that overthrew the Liberal Democrats. And he is asking President Clinton to understand the political pressures his prime minister, Morihiro Hosokawa, is facing as the new government tries to redesign Japan's economic and political systems.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan, apparently tired of being singled out as the "bad guy" of international trade, retaliated Monday in a report that accuses the United States of a range of unfair trade practices and violations of international trade rules. The report, released by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, accuses the United State of having restrictive trade policies in nine of 10 broad categories, contrasted with just six categories for South Korea and the European Community.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one interview, presidential aspirant Ross Perot contends that America's foreign competitors, such as the Japanese, have "picked our pockets." In another, he says that one of the first things he would do in the White House would be to present Japan and Germany with bills for $50 billion apiece to offset U.S. defense costs for maintaining world stability. In a third, he calls President Bush's visit to Japan early this year "a joke."
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan and the United States served notice Friday that they are shelving a planned visit here this spring by Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, amid indications that the political climates may be too tense in both countries for another high-profile session between Miyazawa and President Bush.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, concerned about America's "increasingly corrosive" economic relationship with Japan, warned bluntly Monday that Tokyo must substantially reduce its global trade surplus if it wants to maintain free access to U.S. markets. Outlining the approach the Administration will take Friday when it opens talks intended to establish a new framework for the crucial U.S.-Japanese trade relationship, the officials declined to characterize their warning as an outright threat.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | JIM MANN
China up, Japan down. That, in essence, is the Clinton administration's policy toward Asia these days. In the midst of Asia's financial crisis, President Clinton has been quietly forging an American strategy that gives greater weight to China, and less to Japan, than at any time since Alexander M. Haig Jr. stepped down as Ronald Reagan's secretary of State in 1982.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan signed new defense guidelines Tuesday intended to update their alliance to meet the challenges of the post-Cold War world. Although the revised procedures have generated concern in China, South Korea and other Asian countries, U.S. and Japanese officials said the guidelines do not threaten any other nation and do not change the pacifist Japanese Constitution drafted by the United States after World War II.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The joint security declaration signed Wednesday by President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto represents the start of a sea change in the way Japan views its own military role, analysts here say.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding up a three-day visit to Asia, President Clinton offered Japanese and American audiences a fresh justification for the large U.S. military presence in the Pacific in addresses to the Japanese parliament today and to thousands of whooping, flag-waving service men and women aboard the aircraft carrier Independence.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, skirting the contentious trade issues that have divided their two countries for years, today declared the U.S.-Japan security relationship to be the "cornerstone" of peace and prosperity in Asia. Following a yearlong review of the U.S. military presence in Japan and the rest of northeast Asia, Clinton asserted that the United States will retain its current level of 100,000 troops in the region, including about 47,000 in Japan.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan, once bitter battlefield foes now turned major military partners, are bringing new demands to a security alliance regarded as the linchpin of Asia's peace and prosperity. When President Clinton and Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto meet this week, they will hail new accords that commit Japan to provide more support services for U.S. troops and that compel the United States to reduce its presence in Okinawa.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's arrival in Tokyo this week for the annual meeting of the world's seven leading economic powers inevitably will focus attention on the new Administration's policy toward Japan and, more generally, Asia as a whole. But amid Tokyo's current political upheavals, Clinton's trip is likely to demonstrate that the Administration is having trouble coming to grips with Japan, the world's second-leading economic power, and with the dynamic East Asian region surrounding it.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's Cabinet-level Economic Policy Council recommended Thursday that the Administration not cite Japan for alleged unfair trade practices this year, even though following the recommendation appears certain to spark a backlash in Congress. The unanimous decision is to be announced formally today. Bush, who was not at the meeting, is expected to approve the Cabinet recommendation intact, key Administration officials said.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan has increased by roughly 30% the number of whales it will allow its hunters to kill this winter in restricted seas around Antarctica, and President Clinton is expected to issue what aides describe as a strong complaint today. But, in a move that angers environmentalists, he has decided not to impose trade sanctions on Japan or to threaten such a step, administration officials said.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, the United States and Japan have gone to the brink in a trade dispute and, at the last gasping moment, tiptoed back from it. Once again, Washington and Tokyo have managed to avoid letting commercial frictions undermine the essential bargain forged between them during the Cold War--that the United States would help guarantee Japan's security in exchange for the right to keep troops on Japanese soil. Now the question is whether that relationship can last--and for how long.
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