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United States Foreign Policy Latin America

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NEWS
June 3, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House has ordered a full-scale review of U.S. policy in Latin America with the intention of developing a new package of economic aid for the region similar to that now in place for Eastern Europe's emerging democracies, sources said Saturday. Senior U.S. officials said the effort reflects a personal desire by President Bush to adopt a more activist policy on Latin America.
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NEWS
October 14, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing near the burial place of the continent's revered liberator, President Clinton on Monday told the people of this South American nation that they are "friends and partners" of the United States in a battle to fight drugs, expand social justice and protect the environment of the Western Hemisphere.
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NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle, spearheading U.S. efforts to repair a rift with Latin America over the invasion of Panama, said Monday that he will offer no apology to leaders of the region for "the liberation of Panama." Quayle begins the first of two diplomatic missions to Latin America when he attends a presidential inauguration ceremony Jan. 27 in Honduras. A more extensive trip will be undertaken in February, but no dates have been set.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Air Force One touched down here, the president of the United States stepped onto hostile and uncertain turf. It was 1990: President Bush visited Argentina a day after a failed military rebellion culminated in a firefight in front of the presidential palace. The region was struggling to shake off a history of tyranny and political and economic turmoil. Anti-Americanism was so virulent that Argentine Congress members tried to declare Bush persona non grata.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1989 | From Reuters
The International Monetary Fund on Tuesday called interest-rate cuts, low inflation and open markets vital for the economic health of the industrial and developing world. "A reduction in world interest rates and a more open trading system . . . remain of vital importance," the fund's policy-making Interim Committee said in a communique. The IMF, which polices the world economy, also welcomed a new U.S. plan to help out debt-ridden developing countries, but stopped short of endorsing it fully.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
"I don't have any regrets at all," said Elliott Abrams, the Reagan Administration's least-loved assistant secretary of state. And to show that he means it, Abrams' repertoire of malediction remains as rich as ever. His opponents, he says, are "vipers," President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is "a liar" and members of Congress who blocked U.S. aid to Nicaraguan rebels "will have . . . blood on their hands."
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
In a strong defense of Assistant Secretary Elliott Abrams, Secretary of State George P. Shultz said Tuesday that his embattled aide had violated no laws in his effort to obtain funding for the Nicaraguan rebels and that the Reagan Administration supports Abrams "from top to bottom."
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States eventually may come to regret President Bush's decision to invade Panama, several specialists on American foreign policy predicted Thursday. For all the benefits of ousting strongman Manuel A. Noriega, these experts argue, the long-term consequences could also include more casualties from a protracted guerrilla war; expenses running into millions of dollars for a U.S. occupation force; loss of credibility in Latin America, and growing mistrust of how U.S.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bold Latin American foreign policy initiative that President Bush embarked upon a year ago is paying big political and symbolic dividends, but it has yet to produce many tangible results, policy analysts say. Bush lauded the program this week at a Rose Garden ceremony marking its first anniversary, saying, "We've worked miracles in one year, and so let us shape a revolution in the next."
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unlike his recent predecessors, President Clinton never crossed south of the Rio Grande during his first term. The president's failure to visit Latin America has revived a time-honored lament among Latin American diplomats and analysts: Despite a history of U.S. intervention in its historic "backyard," despite economies and cultures that are increasingly intertwined, the U.S. government largely ignores the region, critics say.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unlike his recent predecessors, President Clinton never crossed south of the Rio Grande during his first term. The president's failure to visit Latin America has revived a time-honored lament among Latin American diplomats and analysts: Despite a history of U.S. intervention in its historic "backyard," despite economies and cultures that are increasingly intertwined, the U.S. government largely ignores the region, critics say.
NEWS
December 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As aides warned that it would be at least a week before the new Administration begins to take shape, President-elect Bill Clinton spoke Tuesday to Latin American leaders and reassured them of his desire to strengthen economic ties with the region. The telephone conversation between Clinton and members of the Rio Group of Latin American leaders meeting in Buenos Aires symbolized the degree to which the demands of foreign affairs have added to the burdens of forging a new government.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bold Latin American foreign policy initiative that President Bush embarked upon a year ago is paying big political and symbolic dividends, but it has yet to produce many tangible results, policy analysts say. Bush lauded the program this week at a Rose Garden ceremony marking its first anniversary, saying, "We've worked miracles in one year, and so let us shape a revolution in the next."
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House has ordered a full-scale review of U.S. policy in Latin America with the intention of developing a new package of economic aid for the region similar to that now in place for Eastern Europe's emerging democracies, sources said Saturday. Senior U.S. officials said the effort reflects a personal desire by President Bush to adopt a more activist policy on Latin America.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, one of Washington's acknowledged political wizards, was a man in his own element on Saturday: working the halls of Congress, charming and cajoling a roomful of lawmakers toward seeing the virtues of the Bush Administration's foreign policy.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed deployment of Navy warships off Colombia has further strained inter-American relations and complicated the drug war, the Bush Administration acknowledged Tuesday. At the same time, U.S. relations with Peru suffered a strain after U.S. troops surrounded a Peruvian diplomat's residence in Panama City. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said U.S. officials are providing assurances to Latin American leaders that the two incidents do not signal an increased U.S.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, one of Washington's acknowledged political wizards, was a man in his own element on Saturday: working the halls of Congress, charming and cajoling a roomful of lawmakers toward seeing the virtues of the Bush Administration's foreign policy.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombian officials Sunday accused the Bush Administration of initiating a naval and air blockade of Colombia and refused to take part in American drug-interdiction patrols off the Colombian coast. Angered by Washington's unilateral decision to dispatch a flotilla of warships for anti-drug patrols off the Colombian coast, the officials complained that they had not been consulted.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle, spearheading U.S. efforts to repair a rift with Latin America over the invasion of Panama, said Monday that he will offer no apology to leaders of the region for "the liberation of Panama." Quayle begins the first of two diplomatic missions to Latin America when he attends a presidential inauguration ceremony Jan. 27 in Honduras. A more extensive trip will be undertaken in February, but no dates have been set.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As furor mounted in Colombia on Monday over the prospect of increased U.S. naval activity in the Caribbean, the Bush Administration backed away from a plan to send two warships to intercept drug traffic off the Colombian coast. U.S. officials denied that the Bush Administration was planning a naval and air blockade of Colombia, as some Colombians charged. "We are not considering a blockade, only the interdiction of drug traffickers," State Department spokesman Margaret Tutwiler said.
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