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United States Foreign Policy Libya

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April 6, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-awaited surrender of two Libyans charged in the bombing of Pan Am 103 will be held out as an example to the world of how rogue states can win political redemption if they comply with international law, U.S. officials said. Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi agreed to turn over the suspects after receiving assurances from Washington that it is prepared to improve diplomatic relations with Libya after a 20-year hiatus, the officials said.
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NEWS
April 6, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-awaited surrender of two Libyans charged in the bombing of Pan Am 103 will be held out as an example to the world of how rogue states can win political redemption if they comply with international law, U.S. officials said. Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi agreed to turn over the suspects after receiving assurances from Washington that it is prepared to improve diplomatic relations with Libya after a 20-year hiatus, the officials said.
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NEWS
July 17, 1996 | Times Wire Services
The Senate moved Tuesday to punish foreign businesses that invest in Iran and Libya, two countries accused by the United States of sponsoring terrorism. The bill, passed by a voice vote and backed by President Clinton, outlines sanctions to be imposed on foreign firms that invest $40 million or more a year to help develop oil and gas resources in Iran or Libya; helped develop Libya's biological, chemical or nuclear weapon capacity; or violated U.N.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | Times Wire Services
The Senate moved Tuesday to punish foreign businesses that invest in Iran and Libya, two countries accused by the United States of sponsoring terrorism. The bill, passed by a voice vote and backed by President Clinton, outlines sanctions to be imposed on foreign firms that invest $40 million or more a year to help develop oil and gas resources in Iran or Libya; helped develop Libya's biological, chemical or nuclear weapon capacity; or violated U.N.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside the large Russian Embassy compound here, the burned-out shells of four cars stand on the curb, windshields smashed, diplomatic license plates singed. The wreckage marks the day a mob of angry Libyans stormed the embassy and were fought back from the chancery door with bursts of tear gas as they demanded an answer from the Russian "traitors." In many ways, however, the black hulks also mark the end of the Cold War in the Middle East.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside the large Russian Embassy compound here, the burned-out shells of four cars stand on the curb, windshields smashed, diplomatic license plates singed. The wreckage marks the day a mob of angry Libyans stormed the embassy and were fought back from the chancery door with bursts of tear gas as they demanded an answer from the Russian "traitors." In many ways, however, the black hulks also mark the end of the Cold War in the Middle East.
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