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United States Foreign Policy Mexico

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NEWS
February 28, 1997 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare display of bipartisan opposition to President Clinton, congressional lawmakers are circulating a letter urging him not to certify Mexico as an ally in the war on drugs. Although congressional leaders said they have not yet counted votes, Democrats and Republicans alike said they expect the number of members signing the letter will be high enough to demonstrate to Clinton that a decision to certify Mexico could be overturned by Congress.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's warm reception in Mexico, at a time when the U.S. is cracking down on illegal immigration and pressing other policies viewed by some as racist, left sociologist Jorge Bustamante stunned Thursday. "This is something I cannot explain scientifically," said Bustamante, a keynote speaker at a U.S.-Mexico symposium at Cal State Northridge. "He demonstrated how excellent a politician he is."
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NEWS
May 6, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edgar Leon hopes President Clinton will resolve the immigration problem. Pedro Perez figures Clinton will choose the next mayor of Mexico City. And Benito Nieto thinks Clinton could curb Mexico's notorious corruption, by warning officials here not to steal so much. As Clinton began his first official visit to Mexico on Monday, officials emphasized that his trip would be largely symbolic.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Draped beneath the presidential box at the Bellas Artes theater here during the "Concert for William Clinton" on Tuesday night were three thick stripes of red, white and blue that the Mexican government designed for President Clinton's state visit.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
As President Clinton arrives today on his first visit to Mexico, he ought to take a lesson from his No. 2's disastrous tour through China earlier this year. Vice President Al Gore was pilloried for sounding such an uncertain trumpet in Beijing. In the process, Gore didn't just hurt himself. He also put one more brick on the wall Clinton must climb to convince Congress not to revoke China's most-favored-nation trading status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's warm reception in Mexico, at a time when the U.S. is cracking down on illegal immigration and pressing other policies viewed by some as racist, left sociologist Jorge Bustamante stunned Thursday. "This is something I cannot explain scientifically," said Bustamante, a keynote speaker at a U.S.-Mexico symposium at Cal State Northridge. "He demonstrated how excellent a politician he is."
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As pressure mounted for Washington to punish Mexico for its failings in the anti-drug fight, analysts and officials here warned Thursday that such a step could poison relations between the two nations and weaken a Mexican president who has been considered a strong U.S. ally. As a result, they said, cooperation in fighting Mexico's powerful drug mafias could actually worsen rather than improve. Under a 1986 U.S.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee is accusing the Federal Reserve Board of meddling in U.S. foreign policy by participating in a new trilateral commission designed to stabilize Mexico's currency. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decision over whether to certify Mexico as an ally in the war on drugs has left many bruises: President Clinton averted a foreign policy debacle but angered important members of Congress. Mexican leaders won relief but were humiliated by the process. Drug fighters in both countries suffered embarrassment and loss of credibility. The process is so peculiar that a growing number of analysts are calling for its abolition.
NEWS
August 29, 1994 | GEORGE SKELTON
As a campaign scrapper, Gov. Pete Wilson has few equals. He's swift on his feet and quickly spots openings--even one provided 2,500 miles away by a grumpy old Communist dictator. Those thousands of Cuban refugees turned loose into the Florida Straits have become Fidel Castro's gift to the Republican governor of California. Wilson unwrapped the present after Florida Gov.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edgar Leon hopes President Clinton will resolve the immigration problem. Pedro Perez figures Clinton will choose the next mayor of Mexico City. And Benito Nieto thinks Clinton could curb Mexico's notorious corruption, by warning officials here not to steal so much. As Clinton began his first official visit to Mexico on Monday, officials emphasized that his trip would be largely symbolic.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
As President Clinton arrives today on his first visit to Mexico, he ought to take a lesson from his No. 2's disastrous tour through China earlier this year. Vice President Al Gore was pilloried for sounding such an uncertain trumpet in Beijing. In the process, Gore didn't just hurt himself. He also put one more brick on the wall Clinton must climb to convince Congress not to revoke China's most-favored-nation trading status.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decision over whether to certify Mexico as an ally in the war on drugs has left many bruises: President Clinton averted a foreign policy debacle but angered important members of Congress. Mexican leaders won relief but were humiliated by the process. Drug fighters in both countries suffered embarrassment and loss of credibility. The process is so peculiar that a growing number of analysts are calling for its abolition.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare display of bipartisan opposition to President Clinton, congressional lawmakers are circulating a letter urging him not to certify Mexico as an ally in the war on drugs. Although congressional leaders said they have not yet counted votes, Democrats and Republicans alike said they expect the number of members signing the letter will be high enough to demonstrate to Clinton that a decision to certify Mexico could be overturned by Congress.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As pressure mounted for Washington to punish Mexico for its failings in the anti-drug fight, analysts and officials here warned Thursday that such a step could poison relations between the two nations and weaken a Mexican president who has been considered a strong U.S. ally. As a result, they said, cooperation in fighting Mexico's powerful drug mafias could actually worsen rather than improve. Under a 1986 U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Congress passed the Drug Free America Act of 1986, it included so many provisions that an obscure clause about certifying foreign countries as doing their part in the fight was barely noticed. Two athletes--University of Maryland basketball forward Len Bias and Cleveland Browns defensive back Don Rogers--had died earlier that year in cocaine incidents, and the public mood bristled with anger against the incessant flow of drugs over U.S. borders.
NEWS
February 27, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Congress passed the Drug Free America Act of 1986, it included so many provisions that an obscure clause about certifying foreign countries as doing their part in the fight was barely noticed. Two athletes--University of Maryland basketball forward Len Bias and Cleveland Browns defensive back Don Rogers--had died earlier that year in cocaine incidents, and the public mood bristled with anger against the incessant flow of drugs over U.S. borders.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
By ties of blood and trade and geography, foreign policy in California looks to the Pacific. Mexico, countries to its south and Asia are the largest sources of immigration into California. The six largest markets for California exports are all nations that border the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Mexico's attorney general announced that his office will be overhauled to root out corruption and improve that country's battle against the narcotics trade, a foreign policy battle erupted here Tuesday over the possibility that the United States will certify Mexico as a nation that cooperates in the war on drugs.
NEWS
May 4, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jubilant about a series of dramatic steps by Mexico to improve cooperation, President Clinton's Cabinet takes a spring break in Mexico next week--traveling here for high-level talks aimed at further cementing ties. In recent weeks, Mexico has extradited citizens to the United States for the first time and has begun to work more closely with the U.S. military, long viewed here with deep suspicion. U.S. officials said both measures could be critical in fighting drug trafficking.
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