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United States Foreign Policy North Korea

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NEWS
July 28, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an unprecedented partisan broadside, four of the Republican Party's biggest foreign policy guns raked President Clinton on Wednesday for undermining U.S. prestige abroad, weakening U.S. defenses and--most of all--being inconsistent in his leadership. "With Haiti, the Administration seems to have changed policies more often than most of us change our shirts--and it's July in Washington," said former Secretary of State James A.
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NEWS
June 7, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a major policy review completed, President Bush on Wednesday ordered his foreign policy team to resume security negotiations with North Korea on a long list of U.S. concerns about the authoritarian regime. Bush administration officials, who have used tough rhetoric about the North Korean government since assuming office, want to discuss the Communist regime's development and export of missiles, as well as the heavy deployment of conventional forces on the Korean peninsula, aides said. U.S.
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NEWS
November 4, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The security threat posed by North Korea has increased "considerably" in the years since President Clinton launched a policy of engagement with the Communist state, a task force of House Republicans charged in a report issued Wednesday. The report, commissioned by House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) in August, asserts that the United States is unable to defend itself adequately against the North Korean threat.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic visit by the first ranking American official ever to come to North Korea, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived in Pyongyang this morning for talks aimed at improving relations between the U.S. and the North and addressing some of the biggest global challenges facing Washington. Albright was greeted by Vice Foreign Minister Kim Gae Gwan in a low-key ceremony at the airport here.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a major policy review completed, President Bush on Wednesday ordered his foreign policy team to resume security negotiations with North Korea on a long list of U.S. concerns about the authoritarian regime. Bush administration officials, who have used tough rhetoric about the North Korean government since assuming office, want to discuss the Communist regime's development and export of missiles, as well as the heavy deployment of conventional forces on the Korean peninsula, aides said. U.S.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | JIM MANN
Note: President Clinton ought to send the following letter, which I have helpfully written for him. To: Kim Jong Il, Supposed Leader Somewhere, North Korea From: Bill Clinton, White House, Washington. Dear Jong Il, I guess it's time to send you a public letter. I need to get a message across. For most of the past year, I've been trying to reach you. But to say the least, you haven't made it easy. Are you really running North Korea now? My own intelligence agencies don't seem to know.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The detention of American helicopter pilot Bobby Hall demonstrated in stark fashion the benefits and many limitations in the far-reaching nuclear deal the Clinton Administration recently worked out with North Korea, the world's most isolated regime. Most of all, the 13-day episode showed that the agreement has done nothing so far to ease tensions raised by conventional military forces on the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | JIM MANN
It must have been quite a jolly celebration in North Korea last weekend. While the rest of the impoverished country scrounged for food, the nation's leaders gathered at Pyongyang's so-called House of Culture to celebrate the 44th anniversary of their "victory" in the Korean War. Their theme, boasted the North Korean news agency: "Today, the Korean revolution is constantly developing on to a higher stage, recording a new chapter of shining victory."
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher indicated Friday that the Clinton Administration intends not only to stop the development of North Korea's still-primitive nuclear weapons program but also to roll back whatever progress it has made so far. The United States cannot accept any form of nuclear weapons program in North Korea, Christopher asserted in a meeting with Times reporters. He said that the ultimate goal of American foreign policy is to ensure a Korean Peninsula without nuclear weapons.
NEWS
July 8, 1988
The United States applauded South Korea's effort to improve contacts with North Korea and urged Pyongyang to respond positively. But the State Department said it has no immediate plans to change its policy barring U.S. diplomats from formal contacts with North Korean officials. South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said in a televised address that Seoul is ready to permit student exchanges, family visits and economic ties--and eventually reunification of the divided peninsula.
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration and North Korea on Thursday took one of the biggest steps in nearly 50 years toward ending their bitter hostilities, issuing a historic joint communique asserting that they had decided to "fundamentally improve" their relations. They also announced that President Clinton is likely to make a groundbreaking visit to North Korea before he leaves office in January. "The U.S.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The security threat posed by North Korea has increased "considerably" in the years since President Clinton launched a policy of engagement with the Communist state, a task force of House Republicans charged in a report issued Wednesday. The report, commissioned by House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) in August, asserts that the United States is unable to defend itself adequately against the North Korean threat.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's International Outlook column appears in this space every Wednesday
There's no better example of the Republican Congress' seeming inability to play a serious, effective role in overseeing American foreign policy than the way it has handled the matter of North Korea. For nearly five years now, Republican congressional leaders have fussed, fumed and fulminated over the Clinton administration's policy of offering incentives to North Korea in exchange for carefully hedged promises not to proceed with nuclear weapons and missile programs.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Few Americans realize it, but the Clinton administration is already drifting quietly away from Kosovo toward its next big foreign policy crisis: North Korea. You can look for this one to burst forth within the next few weeks. The administration's policy toward North Korea--a policy of incanting the totemic word "engagement," pretending everything is fine and stalling off Congress--is nearing the end of the line, in not one way but two.
NEWS
February 22, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration may send former Defense Secretary William J. Perry to North Korea in what would be a high-profile effort to try to resolve disputes over that nation's nuclear and missile programs, according to U.S. officials. Perry was appointed late last year to conduct a review of U.S. policy toward North Korea.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | SONNI EFRON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than five years, North Korea has been skillfully balancing twin policies of begging and brinkmanship, but it may have gone too far Monday by launching what appears to be a new, longer-range ballistic missile, part of which is believed to have flown 828 miles, sailing over the main Japanese island and landing in the Pacific. Japan immediately condemned the test as "a very dangerous act" and said it "cannot be tolerated."
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years of famine and an unraveling economy are driving North Korea out of self-imposed isolation and pushing the Communist regime to engage the outside world, senior U.S. officials said Saturday. On a 24-hour visit to South Korea, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright also suggested that the North's economic suffering finally could nudge Pyongyang into talks with the South to formally end the 47-year-old Korean War and reunite the divided country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korean Americans in Los Angeles reacted with a range of emotions Monday to former President Jimmy Carter's meeting with North Korean leader Kim Il Sung, and the announcement over the weekend that the heads of South Korea and North Korea will hold a summit meeting.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | JIM MANN
It must have been quite a jolly celebration in North Korea last weekend. While the rest of the impoverished country scrounged for food, the nation's leaders gathered at Pyongyang's so-called House of Culture to celebrate the 44th anniversary of their "victory" in the Korean War. Their theme, boasted the North Korean news agency: "Today, the Korean revolution is constantly developing on to a higher stage, recording a new chapter of shining victory."
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years of famine and an unraveling economy are driving North Korea out of self-imposed isolation and pushing the Communist regime to engage the outside world, senior U.S. officials said Saturday. On a 24-hour visit to South Korea, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright also suggested that the North's economic suffering finally could nudge Pyongyang into talks with the South to formally end the 47-year-old Korean War and reunite the divided country.
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