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United States Foreign Policy Pakistan

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May 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration scrambled Thursday to map out a more assertive strategy to contain the escalating nuclear arms race in South Asia, a situation now widely considered more volatile than U.S.-Soviet tensions at the height of the Cold War. "The task before the United States is urgent: to prevent South Asia from a free fall into nuclear war," said a senior administration official. The obstacles to disarmament appear even greater than during the Cold War, according to U.S. analysts.
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NEWS
December 29, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than three months of single-minded concentration on defeating terrorism, the Bush administration faces a potentially more dangerous foreign policy crisis in the confrontation between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan. Unlike with the Sept. 11 attacks, which produced a quick military response, the administration must move far more subtly in trying to mediate between two countries that are playing key roles in the war against terrorism.
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NEWS
September 24, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Affairs said Sunday that Pakistan seems to be going ahead with plans to obtain nuclear weapons and suggested that Congress should cut off the $600-million-a-year U.S. aid program to Islamabad. In a letter to President Bush, Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) asserted that Pakistan has been violating pledges it made to the United States last year to limit its nuclear program. Under existing law, U.S.
NEWS
May 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration scrambled Thursday to map out a more assertive strategy to contain the escalating nuclear arms race in South Asia, a situation now widely considered more volatile than U.S.-Soviet tensions at the height of the Cold War. "The task before the United States is urgent: to prevent South Asia from a free fall into nuclear war," said a senior administration official. The obstacles to disarmament appear even greater than during the Cold War, according to U.S. analysts.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
With moist eyes and an empty heart, the carpet master of Pannian Refugee Camp No. 6 began work this week on a new project. For nearly nine years, Mohammed Yusaf Jawad has been creating rugs that depict the horrors and glories of the Afghan resistance's Islamic holy war against the Soviet-backed government in Kabul. He designs fine-textured Turkoman rugs with patterns characterized by AK-47 rifles, helicopter gunships, rocket launchers, tanks, bombs, grenades, corpses and burning villages.
NEWS
December 29, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than three months of single-minded concentration on defeating terrorism, the Bush administration faces a potentially more dangerous foreign policy crisis in the confrontation between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan. Unlike with the Sept. 11 attacks, which produced a quick military response, the administration must move far more subtly in trying to mediate between two countries that are playing key roles in the war against terrorism.
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Affairs said Sunday that Pakistan seems to be going ahead with plans to obtain nuclear weapons and suggested that Congress should cut off the $600-million-a-year U.S. aid program to Islamabad. In a letter to President Bush, Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) asserted that Pakistan has been violating pledges it made to the United States last year to limit its nuclear program. Under existing law, U.S.
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
With moist eyes and an empty heart, the carpet master of Pannian Refugee Camp No. 6 began work this week on a new project. For nearly nine years, Mohammed Yusaf Jawad has been creating rugs that depict the horrors and glories of the Afghan resistance's Islamic holy war against the Soviet-backed government in Kabul. He designs fine-textured Turkoman rugs with patterns characterized by AK-47 rifles, helicopter gunships, rocket launchers, tanks, bombs, grenades, corpses and burning villages.
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